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A Move to the UK from the US

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posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:04 AM
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originally posted by: TJames
a reply to: redhorse

Have you thought about Ireland? They are not leaving the EU so if you gained Irish citizenship you'd have guaranteed free movement to live and work in 26 other European nations as well.

It's all up in the air for UK citizens now we are leaving the EU so you could find yourself in a stronger freedom of citizenship position in Eire...I'm confident some sort of hash will be arranged for us but it's guaranteed with an EU passport.

...oh and ignore talk of socialised healthcare, there is a thriving private healthcare industry in the UK, nearly every reasonably sized centre of population has a private hospital or two.


We have definitely thought about Ireland. And you are confirming my research as far as private hospitals. I think he should be able to find work that he enjoys without taking too much of a financial hit.




posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
The UK doesn't like immigrants.brexit?

British people arnt as liking of Americans as they were say in the 80s.

But in general if you are an American abroad just say you are Canadian.


The UK does and always has loved immigrants, we have always welcomed them with open arms, IF they were willing to work.

The UK doesn't like the EU.

Hope I caught you up.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: notsure1

I was wondering the same thing. I am an American that has lived all over the world ( a lot of it in Europe, Germany, Belgium, Uk) I feel a lot of people have a romanticized view of places that are unrealistic. Just the fact that you are asking people on here tells me you really don't know much about these places. Have you ever even gone outside the US? My suggestion is to go visit these places for a minimum of a month. It still won't be a 100% accurate view of living there but it will give you a taste. Guess what, Americans are universally despised and hated all over the world. Yes it's true. There is some downright hate, some jealousy and just some ignorance. You will run into all these things, I guarantee it. Some things have changed over the years and some places in Europe don't want migrants anymore, yes even from America. I heard that this is especially true in Germany. Of course there are nice people too, but you'll never be accepted like a local. Maybe you are ok with that.

You say that you and your husband are educated, that is not an automatic ticket to employment. I feel like most Europeans are better educated than Americans. I went to an international school and I saw first hand what the Americans were learning, compared to our European counterparts. How will you secure jobs over the locals, especially if living in remote areas? Job security would be my #1 concern as some areas it is extremely difficult to secure a job. Most likely you'll need a job before you move and a sponsor, just like the US visa system. Even if you have employment secured you'll want citizenship, which is no easy thing either, some places require 5 years of more of residency.

You will find that you miss things about America that you never thought about before. Giving up citizenship is not something to take lightly, and I'm not saying you are, but have you really really done enough to ensure you can make it in Europe?

Like I said I lived in Europe for the greater part of my young life, I only met an American or two that wanted to stay. The vast majority could not wait to come back to the United states. I wonder if the struggles you are going through are perticular to your state. I've lived all over the US too. Some states it almost feels like you are living in a different country. Maybe you just need a change of scenery for a while. Have you thought about Alaska, or Montana or Maine, or some other remote place in the US?



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

I have lived in Montana, Wyoming, Texas, California and Germany. I have been all over the US and seen quite a lot of Europe. Sometimes Germany got weird I must admit. There is definitely not a lot of room to think outside the box in some social circles. As in, don't even approach the walls of the box, in fact, stay right in the middle of the box. Like, if we didn't wash our vehicle every week the neighbors would stop talking to us until we washed it the appropriate number of times for a while. I found the social traces constricting for my Bohemian soul there sometimes. We still had fun though and there are definitely things that I miss.


edit on 5-12-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: TJames

That was my first thought. Ireland is just outside the UK.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: redhorse
So, all of you smart, worldly people on ATS, any knowledge or advice is appreciated here.

My husband and I are ready to pull the plug and move overseas. My husband wants somewhere that speaks English as the primary language. So our first choice is the UK. My daughter wants Scotland, and personally, I don't care as long as it is rural. I am NOT a city girl. Remote is fine. Wild weather is fine. Somewhere we won't be universally resented and/or despised would be great. We have animals so we must by property somewhere horses are workable. Both of us would prefer somewhere we don't necessarily have to worry about fencing our housing for the animals right from the start. Chickens and sheep and maybe a few cows and a garden are something we would like to be able to maintain. What we would call homesteading here.

Transporting those horses will be a pain, the logistics even at first glance are very complicated. My gelding is non-negotiable. He comes with, this is already decided. I would like to keep three, but the other two keepers are female, and quarantine costs for mares are usually higher. Also, one of these mares is vision impaired and she is a spooky girl, this will be especially tough for her. Rough estimates to transport three after all is said and done is 25-30k, (if all goes well), but they keep telling me that they sell shipping in pallets of three so shipping three is not that much more expensive, which may be true, but it seems like the quarantine costs are what gets you as much as anything.

We have three dogs, and a cat. One of the dogs is a pitbull (female) and it looks like we may have to rehome her, if there is any way possible not to please let me know. I am desperate to keep her.

My husband works in senior management in healthcare. We are both educated. I have a Bachelor's degree in psychology but I'm currently not working in that field. Legally, I don't know what the best path is as far as establishing ourselves. We are willing to give up US citizenship.

Any information on areas that may work, and potential pitfalls would be greatly appreciated. Any "don't let the door hit you on the way out", or "We don't want you" maybe not so appreciated but I can see where folks are coming from, so if the spirit moves you and you simply MUST say it or you'll explode, I'll try to be understanding.


Have you considered down under? I understand Australia has restrictions on age, I believe 50 (?). That may not be an issue if your financially comfortable. N.Z. is a possibility, as well.

I won't inquire to your motives, none of my business.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

I live in a very rural place where Americans are very welcome. It is Cornwall. It is beautiful here.

You may be surprised to know but you will be most welcome in the Celtic areas; the West Country, Ireland, Scotland. The South East is not the rest of the UK. Anyone would be wrong to judge the whole of the UK by London.

Cornwall, Devon, Somerset, Ireland and Scotland; these are all farming areas. I am sure many other places in the UK are just the same though rurally.

This is my Uncle's farm. Sorry, the one of my locality is not posting, very strange!



He owns loads of land. You go the ocean and the green and pleasant land here though it is very exposed to the elements in winter, hardly ever cold enough to snow, though it has been known. That's typical coastal Cornwall Peninsula on the north west facing coast.

I wish you well in your plans.


edit on 5-12-2017 by Revolution9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: intrepid

Joined to us with the land border to Northern Ireland. All the talk of politicians from Ireland and UK is that there will still be free movement after Brexit as well, they just don't know how it's going to happen.
Land prices are cheaper in Ireland compared to UK as well.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: Revolution9

Is that picture from one of the 3 non rainy days of the year?



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: intrepid
a reply to: Revolution9

Is that picture from one of the 3 non rainy days of the year?




Yes, it is, must be. It is from Google images.

Shhhhh, don't mention the rain. You will put the OP off, lol.






posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

The one major plus of Europe (most of it anyway) is that they don't poison the food like they do here in the US. Since I grew up in Europe I feel I am significantly healtier than my American grown counterparts. How food is stored there is so different too. I feel like Americans miss out on a lot of good bacteria because were are too clean, we preserve our food too well. We are such a litigious society that we go to extreems with our food, like not allowing people the free will to drink raw milk. I just read that because Americans refrigerate so much of our fruit we are missing out on natural probiotics!



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: JAGStorm

Yep GM food is banned for sale for human consumption in the UK and EU.
Organic actually means organic here, same with your chlorine bleach washed meats...even mc'd's here is healthier than the additive ridden crap they sell US citizens.
Off topic but how did the land of the free ever allow that to happen?



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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I'd recommend trying to move to Norway, especially Trondheim. Lots of green countryside, and Trondheim has an international university. It's easy for Americans to find work there.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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This is where I live,

Newcastle Co Down, Northern Ireland,
Topical pic,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

The Guardian pic showing the golf course,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

Castlewellan Forest park five miles west,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

Part of the silent Valley high up in the Mourne Mountains,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

So, there are two forest parks, Tollymore, and Castlewellan, miles and miles of trekking for people and animals, and still in easy reach from Newcastle which generally has the best of Northern Irish weather being situated on the East coast. Newcastle is about 20miles from the border with Eire, or a slightly longer scenic route all along the East coast up to Newry.
edit on 5-12-2017 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 01:11 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy
This is where I live,

Newcastle Co Down, Northern Ireland,
Topical pic,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

The Guardian pic showing the golf course,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

Castlewellan Forest park five miles west,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

Part of the silent Valley high up in the Mourne Mountains,

files.abovetopsecret.com...

So, there are two forest parks, Tollymore, and Castlewellan, miles and miles of trekking for people and animals, and still in easy reach from Newcastle which generally has the best of Northern Irish weather being situated on the East coast. Newcastle is about 20miles from the border with Eire, or a slightly longer scenic route all along the East coast up to Newry.


Oh it's lovely. And Yay snow! I would miss snow if we moved somewhere without it. I'm a cold weather being really, but I'm willing to sacrifice if I must.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: redhorse

Depend's how much you want to spend but there are some lovely places in the south of England, since you are American's you are also likely to be more accepted by the Welsh as well even than an English person moving there so that is also an option and then there is of course Scotland, lovely people and great scenery as well as huge areas (not compared to the states though) that are underpopulated and fairly wild.

If you don't mind relatively harsh winters compared to the rest of the UK Scotland is probably the best bet, more bang for your buck as well on property and land so long as you don't mind being often distant from local services and amenity's (Dependent upon where in Scotland you choose that is), before you decide thought it really is best to get to know the place and perhaps (Definitely if you can) find other American expat's whom live in whichever area you chose then find out from them what they think about it and also they would be great to help you to make you contact's in that area as well as making a ready made friendly contact for the area.

Were ever you choose I wish you luck and happiness.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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Born and bred in York, Yorkshire (okay North Yorkshire) is a big area for horses - you can this by the number of race courses. So I would give a shout for this area and the numerous very pretty market towns and national parks around. Although I would NOT diss South West, Wales, Scotland, Ireland - all have their charm.
Agree with others, it is worth a tour of the UK.
I think it is worth (assuming you can get a job anywhere) thinking how remote you want to be. We are a small island and hence we Brits may have a different definition of remote.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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In my limited experience, the Welsh were by far the most friendly and interesting in GB. Maybe because my ancestry is Welsh; but I am also Scottish, Irish, British etc. I understand from the history the Welsh share that there is alot of Viking blood from centuries ago when the Vikings raped and pillaged the island. Nice historical stories; sweet people.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience

Believe those fish and chips fill a lot of big bellies there.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 03:15 PM
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Why are so Americans so pissed that she and her family want to leave? Plus, Why the # do you have to comment when you're adding nothing constructive, just been nosy.

Yorkshire is beautiful. I'm from Leeds, wouldn't suggest coming here though as it's just a big city with allot of inner city suburbs that are busy a little bit rough. North Yorkshire, heading out towards North Ridings is a beautiful place. Property out there with around 40 acres of land, 4-5 bedrooms and maybe a barn will set you back more than a million though.

Land isn't cheap over here, especially in the countryside



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