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A Move to the UK from the US

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posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:28 AM
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originally posted by: notsure1
Why are you leaving? You obviously have money and a nice life in rural as it gets Montana.

What makes you decide to just give it up and move to frikin England? And to be so eager to lose US citizenship??

What has you so buthurt about the USA that makes you think it will be any different in another country?


I second this.. I could understand if you were living in California your whole life and thought that Cali represented what the US stands for.

A lot of people complain about the US for no real reason other than its fun to do it. Despite all the flaws the US currently has, I wouldn't trade it for the world. Over time I've come to love the US, as it has allowed me to improve my way of life, and still be free to do pretty much what I want.

People should spend their life in a 3rd world country for a few years and then I'm sure they'd appreciate what they have.




posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:31 AM
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The irony for me was that I was going to recommend that the OP move someplace quite an rural, like montana, before taking the large financial step of moving out of the country.

I guess if you are already there, in montana, a place that many describe as some of the most beautiful land america has, then I guess there is something that just isn't right here for you.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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It has become insanely difficult to move to the UK to live and work under the current xenophobic anti-immigrant government.

You'll need to find a job that pays something like £32,000 before you even have a chance I'm afraid.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:34 AM
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originally posted by: notsure1
Why are you leaving? You obviously have money and a nice life in rural as it gets Montana.

What makes you decide to just give it up and move to frikin England? And to be so eager to lose US citizenship??

What has you so buthurt about the USA that makes you think it will be any different in another country?


I can see that you are upset.

Montana is my home. Part of me will always be here, and this was not a decision that was made lightly. No one is eager to lose U.S. citizenship, we are willing to at this point. There is a difference. We have been discussing this seriously for the last year. The short answer to your question is we both feel that the U.S. is moving rapidly toward profound instability and our nice life will soon become not so nice. Overall, the UK seems more stable and historically, weathers global instability rather well.

No one is "buthurt [sic]". It is not about hurt feelings, it is about maintaining our way of life. I understand if you assess the situation differently, I take your point in your previous post about social mobility in the US, but I disagree with that as well. There are plenty of countries with better social mobility than the US, we just like to think of ourselves as top of the list in that regard. It's not true. We have been lucky, most aren't so lucky, and we would like to keep our standard of living that we have been so lucky to acquire in what is to come.
edit on 5-12-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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I'm sure you've researched this extensively, but I'm curious with regard to your remark about maintaining your way of life.

I'd assume your husband would make much more money in the US's privatized "highly expensive and lucrative" health care industry than the socialized one that exists in england.

Obviously, none of my business but on first glance that to me looks like a huge drop in financial sustenance.

Unless he knows something that the rest of us don't, like impending health car collapse or maybe some other juicy tidbit that all the big CEO's are privy to with their elitist alphabet connections.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Just a shout, if you do move to the UK I'd absolutely recommend renouncing your US citizenship or you will also be taxed by the US government on earnings received here.
Only two countries in the world tax citizens overseas earnings, USA and Eritrea. The only way to avoid the taxes is by renouncing US citizenship.
Good luck with your plans, and welcome if you make it here.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: TJames
a reply to: redhorse

Just a shout, if you do move to the UK I'd absolutely recommend renouncing your US citizenship or you will also be taxed by the US government on earnings received here.
Only two countries in the world tax citizens overseas earnings, USA and Eritrea. The only way to avoid the taxes is by renouncing US citizenship.
Good luck with your plans, and welcome if you make it here.



Thank you for the advice. That was certainly part of our consideration. And thank you for the welcome as well.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Im not upset its your life. But if you have a home, horses, and the money to just pick up and move anywhere in the world you have it better than 90% of us.

I would just keep riding that train.

You remind of the guy that says I love it here and would never leave, but as soon as I got my check I was gone.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Have you researched Canada at all? There are places that have banned pitbull type dogs, and anything that looks like them, so that would become part of your research. Northern BC, Northern Alberta are both nice. Northern Saskatchewan is cold, but has some beautiful areas around Nipawin (east of Prince Albert).
I don't know very much about eastern Canada, at all.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:46 AM
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My hubby's buddy in London says you should be looking at New Zealand. He's been there with his own family and says it has everything you want on your bullet points list. The key things to keep in mind is getting there is a costlier plane ticket, and getting the animals there may be costlier, but he strongly recommends looking into NZ first regardless.

Good luck, Red, I'd love to pick up & set down elsewhere! Lived in Asia as a kid myself, there's really nothing quite like having the country blinders removed and seeing the world as it's meant to be seen -- huge, wide-open, and well worth moseying around. It's like going against the grain & picking a different room in the house to be a master bedroom, just because someone says one country should be residency priority by birth default/one-sided opinion doesn't mean squat. Borders are just borders, there's no logical reason to be bound by them by default if you don't want to be



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

I lived in Germany for 3.5 years while I was in the military (in Bavaria, near Wurzburg). While English is not a first language there, from what I understand, all modern students must take English in school, so most, including professional adults, for the most part, speak English enough to communicate effectively.

As far as how they ALL feel about Americans, I don't know--many respect us for our participation in WWII and our help in keeping them stable and rebuilding their cities after the war, but I think that, as younger generations age and the older die out, that feeling will probably be forgotten and wane over time.

In my experience, though, you have your xenophobic, stereotyping people everywhere in Europe and other countries, with preconceived notions as to how you will be and act, but as long as you are respectful and kind and show a desire to appreciate and embrace the culture, you should be welcome anywhere over time.

As for your desire to leave America, while I don't share your concern that things are coming to a head in America, I respect your willingness to actually leave instead of sitting around and complaining about things and doing nothing constructive.

Best regards, and I hope that you get it all figured out and don't end up regretting things. Definitely research the laws, wherever you plan to go, because you may be surprised at how much we take for granted here in America that you cannot do abroad.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:47 AM
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originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: redhorse

Have you researched Canada at all? There are places that have banned pitbull type dogs, and anything that looks like them, so that would become part of your research. Northern BC, Northern Alberta are both nice. Northern Saskatchewan is cold, but has some beautiful areas around Nipawin (east of Prince Albert).
I don't know very much about eastern Canada, at all.


It was one of my suggestions but my husband vetoed, and I'm still not sure why.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: Nyiah
My hubby's buddy in London says you should be looking at New Zealand. He's been there with his own family and says it has everything you want on your bullet points list. The key things to keep in mind is getting there is a costlier plane ticket, and getting the animals there may be costlier, but he strongly recommends looking into NZ first regardless.

Good luck, Red, I'd love to pick up & set down elsewhere! Lived in Asia as a kid myself, there's really nothing quite like having the country blinders removed and seeing the world as it's meant to be seen -- huge, wide-open, and well worth moseying around. It's like going against the grain & picking a different room in the house to be a master bedroom, just because someone says one country should be residency priority by birth default/one-sided opinion doesn't mean squat. Borders are just borders, there's no logical reason to be bound by them by default if you don't want to be


Will do. Hubby is afraid of poisonous things in Australia, but it seems the flora and fauna is a bit more subdued in New Zealand. At first glance, it does seem there is a resentment toward Americans there that is pervasive though. We are willing to try to fit in anywhere though. We understand that we will be immigrants, and if we are walking away from one culture, we have an obligation to understand and embrace the other.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:51 AM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: redhorse

Have you researched Canada at all? There are places that have banned pitbull type dogs, and anything that looks like them, so that would become part of your research. Northern BC, Northern Alberta are both nice. Northern Saskatchewan is cold, but has some beautiful areas around Nipawin (east of Prince Albert).
I don't know very much about eastern Canada, at all.


It was one of my suggestions but my husband vetoed, and I'm still not sure why.


From what I am reading it looks like you dont give a shi where you go just as long as you leave America?

Good luck.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Maybe he thinks it's too close to the states?
It is a lot different from the states, maybe just not enough different?
I actually have come to prefer Saskatchewan, north of Saskatoon, rural only, because there's a lot of stupid rules about animals in the cities/towns.
But it does get brutally cold there in the winters, farm animals get almost furry.

I have always liked the look of rural Scotland though, it has an old world look, that would be my choice, just going from tv and pictures.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: redhorse

I lived in Germany for 3.5 years while I was in the military (in Bavaria, near Wurzburg). While English is not a first language there, from what I understand, all modern students must take English in school, so most, including professional adults, for the most part, speak English enough to communicate effectively.

As far as how they ALL feel about Americans, I don't know--many respect us for our participation in WWII and our help in keeping them stable and rebuilding their cities after the war, but I think that, as younger generations age and the older die out, that feeling will probably be forgotten and wane over time.

In my experience, though, you have your xenophobic, stereotyping people everywhere in Europe and other countries, with preconceived notions as to how you will be and act, but as long as you are respectful and kind and show a desire to appreciate and embrace the culture, you should be welcome anywhere over time.

As for your desire to leave America, while I don't share your concern that things are coming to a head in America, I respect your willingness to actually leave instead of sitting around and complaining about things and doing nothing constructive.

Best regards, and I hope that you get it all figured out and don't end up regretting things. Definitely research the laws, wherever you plan to go, because you may be surprised at how much we take for granted here in America that you cannot do abroad.



Thank you very much. We lived in Germany too (Mannheim). My daughter was born there (Heidelberg) . Did some traveling around, saw a bit of Europe. It was fun.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:57 AM
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originally posted by: notsure1

originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: snowspirit
a reply to: redhorse

Have you researched Canada at all? There are places that have banned pitbull type dogs, and anything that looks like them, so that would become part of your research. Northern BC, Northern Alberta are both nice. Northern Saskatchewan is cold, but has some beautiful areas around Nipawin (east of Prince Albert).
I don't know very much about eastern Canada, at all.


It was one of my suggestions but my husband vetoed, and I'm still not sure why.


From what I am reading it looks like you dont give a shi where you go just as long as you leave America?

Good luck.

Sounds more like initial planning stages to me, where they're looking at all the options that fit their desires & trying to narrow them down. Whether or not someone takes a year, or a month, start to finish moving is neither here nor there, though. They're about where we were when we hit the road, so props due to Redhorse & Co for taking their time compared to us. I'm originally from Florida, but when the sudden opportunity to move the F out of that black hole presented itself, it was kind of like spending a few weeks throwing darts at a map blindfolded in the dark between everyone. There were many options as far as other states went, and where we are now (MI) was decided about less than a week before we hit the road.
/shrug



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Hi,

Firstly, have you ever visited us in the UK before?
If not then that should be top of your list because, what you imagine it to be like may be far from the reality of the situation.

I live in the north of England, on the edge of the Yorkshire dales and not too far from the lake district. It is very beautiful here, perhaps bleak and moody at times (we are in Bronte country - think "Wuthering Heights"), especially this time of year, but the history and landscape is wonderful (though the weather is frequently NOT).

We are a very small island and the area of land available is tiny compared to the states. As a result, buying anywhere with land is an expensive endeavour. The further south you go the more ridiculous the prices.
Here in the north it is perfectly possible to buy a reasonably priced property with land, moreso if you are prepared to put in some work. My mum's partner is selling his farm currently for example and it is a large building with outbuildings and ample land surrounding it yet is is likely to sell for only around £250,000 due to the fact it is a traditional farm house and needs quite a bit of work to bring it up to modern standards (hot water and heating is provided by open fires and a boiler behind for example).
In terms of being welcomed; I would say that English people LOVE to moan and complain and talk a lot of #e but, underneath that we are a (mostly) tolerant society with an ethos of "do unto others". I don't foresee any issues with you being not welcomed wherever you stay.
They say the people in the north are famous for their being friendly and willing to talk to anyone at any time about pretty much anything. Though, as with anywhere you go, people are a mixed bag.

I would recommend that you at least visit first and see the lay of the land for yourself before making any serious inquiries.

Best of luck with your searching and you're always welcome around mine for a cup of tea if you're ever in this part of the world

edit on 5-12-2017 by Indrasweb because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-12-2017 by Indrasweb because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

Have you thought about Ireland? They are not leaving the EU so if you gained Irish citizenship you'd have guaranteed free movement to live and work in 26 other European nations as well.

It's all up in the air for UK citizens now we are leaving the EU so you could find yourself in a stronger freedom of citizenship position in Eire...I'm confident some sort of hash will be arranged for us but it's guaranteed with an EU passport.

...oh and ignore talk of socialised healthcare, there is a thriving private healthcare industry in the UK, nearly every reasonably sized centre of population has a private hospital or two.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: Indrasweb
a reply to: redhorse

Hi,

Firstly, have you ever visited us in the UK before?
If not then that should be top of your list because, what you imagine it to be like may be far from the reality of the situation.

I live in the north of England, on the edge of the Yorkshire dales and not too far from the lake district. It is very beautiful here, perhaps bleak and moody at times (especially this time of year) but the history and landscape is wonderful (though the weather is frequently NOT).

We are a very small island and the area of land available is tiny compared to the states. As a result, buying anywhere with land is an expensive endeavour. The further south you go the more ridiculous the prices.
Here in the north it is perfectly possible to buy a reasonably priced property with land, moreso if you are prepared to put in some work. My mum's partner is selling his farm currently for example and it is a large building with outbuildings and ample land surrounding it yet is is likely to sell for only around £250,000 due to the fact it is a traditional farm house and needs quite a bit of work to bring it up to modern standards (hot water and heating is provided by open fires and a boiler behind for example).
In terms of being welcomed; I would say that English people LOVE to moan and complain and talk a lot of #e but, underneath that we are a (mostly) tolerant society with an ethos of "do unto others". I don't foresee any issues with you being not welcomed wherever you stay.
They say the people in the north are famous for their being friendly and willing to talk to anyone at any time about pretty much anything. Though, as with anywhere you go, people are a mixed bag.

I would recommend that you at least visit first and see the lay of the land for yourself before making any serious inquiries.

Best of luck with your searching and you're always welcome around mine for a cup of tea if you're ever in this part of the world


I agree that a visit is good advice and it is part of the plan. I never did make it to the UK even when we had a chance. It was always a regret, and doubly so now.
edit on 5-12-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)




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