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A Move to the UK from the US

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posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:29 AM
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So, all of you smart, worldly people on ATS, any knowledge or advice is appreciated here.

My husband and I are ready to pull the plug and move overseas. My husband wants somewhere that speaks English as the primary language. So our first choice is the UK. My daughter wants Scotland, and personally, I don't care as long as it is rural. I am NOT a city girl. Remote is fine. Wild weather is fine. Somewhere we won't be universally resented and/or despised would be great. We have animals so we must by property somewhere horses are workable. Both of us would prefer somewhere we don't necessarily have to worry about fencing our housing for the animals right from the start. Chickens and sheep and maybe a few cows and a garden are something we would like to be able to maintain. What we would call homesteading here.

Transporting those horses will be a pain, the logistics even at first glance are very complicated. My gelding is non-negotiable. He comes with, this is already decided. I would like to keep three, but the other two keepers are female, and quarantine costs for mares are usually higher. Also, one of these mares is vision impaired and she is a spooky girl, this will be especially tough for her. Rough estimates to transport three after all is said and done is 25-30k, (if all goes well), but they keep telling me that they sell shipping in pallets of three so shipping three is not that much more expensive, which may be true, but it seems like the quarantine costs are what gets you as much as anything.

We have three dogs, and a cat. One of the dogs is a pitbull (female) and it looks like we may have to rehome her, if there is any way possible not to please let me know. I am desperate to keep her.

My husband works in senior management in healthcare. We are both educated. I have a Bachelor's degree in psychology but I'm currently not working in that field. Legally, I don't know what the best path is as far as establishing ourselves. We are willing to give up US citizenship.

Any information on areas that may work, and potential pitfalls would be greatly appreciated. Any "don't let the door hit you on the way out", or "We don't want you" maybe not so appreciated but I can see where folks are coming from, so if the spirit moves you and you simply MUST say it or you'll explode, I'll try to be understanding.




posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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Are you moving due to change in employment?

I'm asking because the new employer would probably have a lot of connections or help available for relocation to a new country.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: redhorse



Lucky you, I would love to move out of the U.S. England would be a great place to live. There are plenty of rural areas too.




posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: kurthall
a reply to: redhorse



Lucky you, I would love to move out of the U.S. England would be a great place to live. There are plenty of rural areas too.



I seem to recall looking into it years ago. I recall it being difficult to move there and get citizenship or any sort of permanent residence status.

Maybe that has changed?



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock
Are you moving due to change in employment?

I'm asking because the new employer would probably have a lot of connections or help available for relocation to a new country.


I understand. It's a good question, but no not a change of employment. He would like to continue working and further, continue working in health care so if you have any ideas on how we might start making some connections that way I would be grateful. He doesn't want to tip off the place he is working now, because they are grooming and eyeballing him for CEO once the current one steps down. But seeking international employment is way out of our wheel house so we are neophytes here I admit.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: kurthall
a reply to: redhorse



Lucky you, I would love to move out of the U.S. England would be a great place to live. There are plenty of rural areas too.



I seem to recall looking into it years ago. I recall it being difficult to move there and get citizenship or any sort of permanent residence status.

Maybe that has changed?


Probably hasn't changed.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:40 AM
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The UK doesn't like immigrants.brexit?

British people arnt as liking of Americans as they were say in the 80s.

But in general if you are an American abroad just say you are Canadian.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: redhorse
If you really don't mind wild weather, Scotland sounds the better answer. More open. I am English, myself, so I'm being objective here.
Much depends on how much you need road communications with other parts of the country. North of the Highland line, the geography of the landscape limits the choice of routes.
Alternatively, the more developed countryside of England, which you will find mostly in the south, all the way from Cornwall (my mother's county) to Norfolk ("Very flat, Norfolk").
Or the mountains, again, of Wales.

P.S. Dogs may be a problem. I think they have to be quarantined for a period on entry, because of the threat of rabies.


edit on 5-12-2017 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: Nexttimemaybe
The UK doesn't like immigrants.brexit?

British people arnt as liking of Americans as they were say in the 80s.

But in general if you are an American abroad just say you are Canadian.


Lol. Gotcha. I was born and raised (and still live) in Montana. I sound Canadian anyway.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: redhorse
If you really don't mind wild weather, Scotland sounds the better answer. More open. I am English, myself, so I'm being objective here.
Much depends on how much you need road communications with other parts of the country. North of the Highland line, the geography of the landscape limits the choice of routes.
Alternatively, the more developed countryside of England, which you will find mostly in the south, all the way from Cornwall (my mother's county) to Norfolk ("Very flat, Norfolk").
Or the mountains, again, of Wales.



Thank you. I will put Scotland and Wales at the top of the list.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:47 AM
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Best wishes with their cuisine. I lost weight when visited for 2 months. Worst food I ever had eaten.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:47 AM
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Come to Devon. We are the warmest and most welcoming people. The fact that you are Americans will not make you unwelcome. The only people who are not welcome in Devon are those that move here and complain and refuse to embrace the way of life.

We are proud of our beautiful county and its history, and heritage. We are smart and hardy, but we are also kind, warm, open and welcoming.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:50 AM
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originally posted by: CulturalResilience
Come to Devon. We are the warmest and most welcoming people. The fact that you are Americans will not make you unwelcome. The only people who are not welcome in Devon are those that move here and complain and refuse to embrace the way of life.

We are proud of our beautiful county and its history, and heritage. We are smart and hardy, but we are also kind, warm, open and welcoming.


Well thank you! I will take a look.

*edited to add

Oh my goodness, it is just BEAUTIFUL there, and history, location, access to the sea AND nice people. I had no idea. It sure is checking all the boxes on everyone's wish list.
edit on 5-12-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:54 AM
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a reply to: CulturalResilience
And, of course, you have Dartmoor. Yes, OP, I can vouch for the appeal of Devon.
(My grandparents lived in Teignmouth, we used to visit every Easter)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

If you have qualifications and a profession that will stand you in good stead , an offer of a job will open the door but you should be able to get a visa to allow you temporary stay until you've found work.
Personally I'd say look at the South West or East of the country.

If I were you I'd be looking at New Zealand or Australia as the way things are going our future in the UK is a bit uncertain due to Brexit and the political games being played because of it.

Happy hunting.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

I was born just along the coast from Teignmouth and now live on Dartmoor. I consider myself extremely fortunate and never want to live anywhere else.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: Justso
Best wishes with their cuisine. I lost weight when visited for 2 months. Worst food I ever had eaten.


More Americans should visit and stay for longer.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

I will bet dollars to donuts you will miss America in 6 months and regret the decision to leave.

I mean all living here has done is afforded you the opportunity to be CEO of a company and have the funds to just move anywhere on a whim.

Yeah America must blow.

edit on 5-12-2017 by notsure1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:10 AM
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Take no notice of nextime. The only problem people have with immigrants is mainly in the cities and then it's of the Eastern European kind or a certain religious group. I have not seen or heard of any discrimination against any Americans at all.
My advice would be to come for a holiday first and get the info on land and property prices. Unless you're very rich keep away from Cornwall, Devon, Kent, Essex or any where near a coast as the prices are higher than inland. Wales is also a no, no as the Welsh do not like anyone buying into their land. Scotland is full of big landowners and you would be lucky to get a decent property for your animals as any decent grazing is took by sheep. The same goes for the Yorkshire Dales and the Derbyshire Peak District.
Your best bet is in the Shires where you might pick up a decent small holding. But large tracts of land are very few and far between.
As I say come over and check everything out, the average price for land around here is about £10000 an acre.
Only one word of warning keep away from staying in the cities they ARE NOT representative of the UK. Get into the country and you'll find it's a different place altogether.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 10:11 AM
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Why are you leaving? You obviously have money and a nice life in rural as it gets Montana.

What makes you decide to just give it up and move to frikin England? And to be so eager to lose US citizenship??

What has you so buthurt about the USA that makes you think it will be any different in another country?



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