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Why do we have the internet for education?

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posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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Why do we have the internet?

I'm tired of studying from the internet. My eyes hurts and it is a waste of paper printing out stuff which aren't going to be on the test at all. What the hell happened to learning from the master? The Teachers are forcing everyone to google everything now. This is just wrong very wrong.

What happens when internet gets shutdown?
I want my notes right in front of my face where it doesn't require any turn on button.

What happens if we have no computer at all?

School is a joke now. We have to buy stupid stuff just to get grade As. This isn't free education at all. It is total BS. I want out of this system!


Don't get me started with books we are forced to buy and never use the entire book at all. It should have been written by a master in which we would study the entire book. Waste of manufacturing energy, time, and space for everyone. Just show me the stuff so I can study it and work on it. I don't want to carry multiple books that weigh me down. Give me one book with all the information. Education is a total joke!

The heck happened to our education system?

edit on 3-12-2017 by makemap because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 09:24 PM
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a reply to: makemap

What happened to our education system?

Unions and the government are in charge. There's your problem.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 09:30 PM
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raise a generation who can't think for themselves?
check.

train their children to depend on a source of information nearly completely controlled by the oppression?
check.

gee, I wonder where this goes..........



oh, right. take control of the internet like they control the msm, then cut off sources of free thought.


good luck everyone else, I'm leaving now.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 09:43 PM
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I spend a lot of hours researching stuff on the net, eighty percent to do with medicine and food chemistry and my eyes hurt too. I must put in six hours a day studying, and another three hours on a few sites like ATS and just reading new scientific information on sites like science daily and Physics.org.

I get a break when I have to do firewood or work on stuff around the house though, and of course, I cook and plow and shovel in the winter. I took around twenty six classes on line but haven't taken any this winter yet. I have no desire to go listen to an instructor tell me what the medical industry wants me to think is the only option. I do go to many medical sites, then verify if their stuff is right and look for alternative chemistries that nature supplies, hacking the chemistry of the medicines.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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a reply to: makemap

Every generation has complaints about its schooling. Back when they only learned from "masters", their knowledge was directly limited to the knowledge of their supposed "master". Why assume those teachers were any smarter or had better mastery of subject matter than teachers today?

And when I was in school, our main scholastic resources were in libraries or the books we had to buy for class. The size of the library's resources directly limited the knowledge we could obtain (unless you bought other subject-related books on your own). Just imagine having to write long crappy reports about lame historical figures, only to find out the books you needed were already checked out by someone else. Better change your subject or go to a library in another area.

And actual reference books couldn't even be checked out, so you'd still have to get hard copies either by writing notes from those books or by using a copying machine. And libraries have limited hours of operation, so you only had a limited amount of time to access their resources anyway (and that's assuming that no one else had the book when you got there). Surely you can see why internet access greatly increases the amount of available resources, right? And since the internet doesn't have "hours of operation", you can now research your topic up to the very last minute).

It seems like 4 or 5 steps forward for every 1 step backwards to those of us who went through a previous version of this schooling. Oh & students who don't have computers or internet access should either go to their local public library or to their school's library. That's literally what they're there for.


Broke college student tip: When books were too expensive, we'd share them. Someone would buy a single copy and then the rest would make copies of it with the school's copying machine. Those copied versions could even be shared among each other. This works especially well if your group has the same teacher/class but at different times. (I had a fine female classmate share one of my books for close to half the semester, sitting beside me and everything. Just have to be creative & turn lemons into lemonade lol)



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:06 PM
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in my experience i found as multiple choice tests and homework was pushed more and more the teachers got lazier and lazier. they no longer have an idea of what a students capabilities are since they arent reading and evaluating your homework, instead they feed the cards into a machine which scans them and gives them a number. multiple choice itself is flawed and instead of testing your knowledge tests your abilities to deduce the right answer from the 3-4 choices. most times 2 of them are blatantly wrong eliminating those choices at a glance leaving you with a 50/50 chance at guessing the right answer. i personally have no problem with our school systems maintaining a database for students to learn from. it can be kept up to date at a vastly lower cost compared to purchasing books to teach with in class. btw anyone ever notice how all the math books had the answer for all the odd numbered questions in the back of the book. like wth we literally give half the answers away blatantly and openly



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:15 PM
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Yeah, in my experience the education system here in the U.S. is barely more than a scam. I've been going to a university for about 3 years now and I'll be graduating after next semester. Some of my classes have involved nothing more than staying home, reading a chapter in an online e-book and doing a short quiz each week with no interaction from an actual professor... Oh, and guess how much that costs? $2,200 for each single class where that's all you do. The university literally charges me $2,200 to stay home and read a book I could buy on amazon for $50.
edit on 12/3/2017 by trollz because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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a reply to: makemap

I need a few years time but hang in there... I plan to help change these hardships towards the positive.

Our best and most impactful teachers should be the millionaires of our society and be able to influence more than 36 children a year. I have stalled on making it happen in times past, but there's a ton of ideas of how to heal these things, and am currently building the family that can make good moves on these things.

It starts with treating each and everyone as they would want their own children treated... leaving those that operate on negativity behind progress.

I look forward to reading posts of healing measures after venting frustrations please... it would be invaluable thought food for my efforts to come.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: makemap

In today's information economy, the information transfer rate of books is too slow. What you are saying is why are people using power tools when hand-tools are what really make you a craftsman. It makes no sense what you are saying. I'd rather use power tools for everything. It's takes less time and less drudgery.

The Khan Academy is awesome for online education: www.khanacademy.org...



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: makemap

Big difference between education and knowledge. This is the world you live in. Your universe is what you make it. So, make the best of it.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 01:03 AM
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a reply to: makemap
I was kicked out of high school and never went to college, I do not know your pain. Sorry bro.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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a reply to: makemap Because you can gain more information from the internet then your biased teacher. The internet can be a # but it does have have its benefits.




posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry I was almost kicked out of school for a couple of reasons. Then I was sent away to military school for six months. And it actually worked lol then I did my thing and got to where I am at know. I plan on leaving big pharma and going into business for myself here soon but I need everything to run just as smoothly as it is now when I do. So I kinda feel ya there. I hope you are doing well.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 01:25 AM
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a reply to: Allaroundyou
Yea, I could have used some of that I will admit. Maybe I would have averted the downward spiral that lasted till I was 25. At least I have been set on the right path through trial and error years ago. man, sometimes life can really kick you in the nuts, especially when you make poor choices.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 01:59 AM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry Yea life always kicks you in the nuts. It may hurt but use that pain to motivate yourself. Life may suck if you let it. With everything going on just use what you have to your advantage and kick #. I made alot of bad decisions after that. T&C I may have tried every drug under the sun but that just gave me determination to do what I do now. The spiral you speak of I have been down. You got this bro



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 02:32 AM
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a reply to: makemap

Learning to research for yourself, and use and evaluate multiple sources , is fundamental for education.

This is more true now than ever when the facts are a available to anyone online, it's the ability to understand the facts that gives education it's value.

I can't imagine any education system worse than being given a single source and being expected to memorise.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 05:43 AM
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a reply to: makemap

I think the internet is a great tool for learning if you know how to use it. Unfortunately, (some/many) people in search of knowledge have been subjects of indoctrination by (in cahoots) alphabet agencies, certain social media networks, and certain wikis to only accept one answer at first glance without questioning the source or even thinking critically about a conclusion.

Now for the teachers. I am in my mid-30's, I never graduated high school. I didn't give a sh** because of politics in the education system. I had some awesome teachers, but I had the sense to see that there were more teachers there for a paycheck and not for the teaching of bright young minds. And yeah I called them out on it big time and they did not like it. So that being said new-school agenda pushing teachers are FU**ING LAZY, they are only in it for a check, and they give zero sh**s for their students.

(Disclaimer) : I know I left alot out here and also I am not saying this about all teachers. Just speaking from experience.

Cheers big ears haha!



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: Allaroundyou
a reply to: makemap Because you can gain more information from the internet then your biased teacher. The internet can be a # but it does have have its benefits.



Im picking up what you are throwing down here.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: makemap

makemap,

Students have ALWAYS had to have access to more than one book, because no singular volume can be considered totally comprehensive, complete in its depth of informational density, in a manner which entirely covers a subject and the matters upon which a student might be tested in any given field.

And fields worth studying in any seriousness at all, like medicine, physics of the high and complicated variety, engineering and technology fields, are, in this era at least, constantly in massive flux. Physics as an example, has changed immensely in the last decade alone, year on year, hell, even month on month, new discoveries are being made with various pieces of apparatus, from the LIGO and VIRGO detectors studying gravitational waves, to the LHC probing the mysteries of the early universe, things are moving on a pace, and compiling data, writing educational material, editing it and amending it, takes time. Its almost invariably the case nowadays, that if you want up to the moment information on a topic, you do not refer to a hefty tome, but to a data heavy webpage or app, which directs you to the latest information.

Think about this logically for a second... Lets say that a new fundamental particle were to be discovered, tomorrow. A book written three years ago, as comprehensive as it might be, cannot possibly be expected to contain that information, because essential principles of physics insist that if the book was written three years ago, it cannot possibly contain information which will only be discovered, hell, hinted at, in the next twenty four hours. If it could, causality would be broken, and none of the information contained within the book would be valid, because none of that stuff would apply very well to a universe in which causality has been abandoned in favour of temporal chaos.

No, in order to access up to the minute data, about pretty much EVERYTHING, the internet is the place to be, the tool to both transmit and receive that data, because none is equal to it, or even nearly as good as it. If I was restricted to the information I was permitted to access during my education, the resources of information which were available at the libraries I had access to during that part of my life, I would be a much less well informed fellow than I am. Certainly, I have done a fairly impressive amount of bookworming in my life, but books age badly with time, especially in busy and ever changing fields like those I mentioned. The internet however, does not merely grow browned with time, dogeared from over use by uncareful thumb, and the information within it does not become obsolete without being updated. Updates occur in realtime, as the information imparted is being discovered. Its a faster and more reliable source of data, provided you know how to parse it.

Now then, with all the above being said and done, your tutors ought to be far more pro-active about delivering the course to the student, than to have you all sit down in a classroom or lecture theatre, and instruct you to google the queries set by the curriculum. From practical demonstrations, to the way a lecture is delivered, there is very much something to be said for the role of the educator. Ask Neil deGrasse Tyson. This is a man who not only works in the field of Astrophysics, but takes seriously his role as an educator. He is head of the Hayden Planetarium, New York, part of the American Museum of Natural History.

Not only did he enter the field of Astrophysics, absorbing all the data he could, but he also learned over the course of his life, to be a fantastic orator, a master of the written and spoken word, with a rich, deep, interesting voice, which is capable of holding captive any ear which encounters it. Not only does he know his subject well, and have a fantastic grasp of language but he clearly LOVES it, which means that when he speaks about it, his understanding of language and subject matter, flow together to produce passionate, interesting takes on the task of explaining the finer points of things to those who hear him speak.

Now, not everyone can be Neil deGrasse Tyson, but everyone who is teaching people something, needs to have a love for it, and for communicating the subject, which is clear beyond questioning, have a preparedness to engage with both student and topic enthusiastically, and make students WANT to spend their off time, deep diving subject matter related topics, just for their own satisfaction.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

It's unfortunate that this tip doesn't work anymore, in many cases anyway. A lot of textbooks can no longer be shared or even purchased as used because they now come with a code that is redeemed online in order to take a test or write something or whatever else. The code is associated with a single student so it isn't just material that can be written down and used elsewhere or anything. It prevents students from being able to share because every student has to have their own code. This isn't even for online classes, which I could understand to some extent. It just assures the book publishers get every dime they can for already expensive textbooks.




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