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question about google earth sky

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posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:17 PM
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Maybe a silly question but, why is it when you search for earth in google earth sky, you get no results?




posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: dan121212

Because telescopes and cameras on earth pointed away from earth can't see earth.

When you look at the sky why don't you see the ground?



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:40 PM
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a reply to: DumpMaster

but the images are from hubble etc no?



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: dan121212
a reply to: DumpMaster

but the images are from hubble etc no?


Even if so, hubble isn't point at the planet.

When you look into space with your own eyes why don't you see earth.
Cause you're on it, that's why.

It's the same as if you're on the moon and you look into space. You see earth but no moon. Why's that? it's cause you're on the moon.
edit on 3-12-2017 by DumpMaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: DumpMaster

so all images from google earth sky are from earth, is that what you are saying, cuz you keep repeating



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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Also, two questions about Google Sky posted within minutes: www.abovetopsecret.com...
Something uncanny going on here.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: DumpMaster


Even if so, hubble isn't point(ed) at the planet.

Ever?



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 02:40 PM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: intrptr

Doesn't look like it


Thanks for the official disclaimer. They just don't want the 'enemy' knowing its possible.


Finally, the HST orbits the Earth at a speed (27,000 kilometers per hour or 17,000 miles per hour). Its speed in orbit above Earth is so fast that any image it took would be blurred by the motion.

Astronauts devised a simple apparatus to counter orbital speed. "Barn door trackers" "from spare parts aboard ISS". The Hubble is so sophisticated, gyro stabilized and retrofitted numerous times with more equipment over its lifespan?

30 seconds into here...



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: projectvxn
a reply to: intrptr

Doesn't look like it


Thanks for the official disclaimer. They just don't want the 'enemy' knowing its possible.


Finally, the HST orbits the Earth at a speed (27,000 kilometers per hour or 17,000 miles per hour). Its speed in orbit above Earth is so fast that any image it took would be blurred by the motion.

Astronauts devised a simple apparatus to counter orbital speed. "Barn door trackers" "from spare parts aboard ISS". The Hubble is so sophisticated, gyro stabilized and retrofitted numerous times with more equipment over its lifespan?

30 seconds into here...


Note the word 'manually' and the involvement of an astronaut there.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 03:04 PM
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originally posted by: dan121212
a reply to: DumpMaster

but the images are from hubble etc no?


Some, but not all, of the close-ups of galaxies and nebulae when you zoom in on Google Sky are from Hubble. However, most of the starry sky images are from wide-angle survey photos from ground-based telescopes. Many of them are decades old. That may sound odd, but other than stuff moving around in our solar system (The Moon, Sun planets, etc.) the sky simply doesn't change much in a century or ten.

Some people try to use Google Sky to look for things coming into the solar system (ALIENS!!!), but that's like trying to use Google Earth to watch a football game. It;s not "real-time".

Hope this helps.




posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: dan121212
a reply to: DumpMaster

but the images are from hubble etc no?

Hubble is very close to Earth -- orbiting at an altitude of only 350 miles. Since the Hubble's optics are not designed to view something so close, the images would not be that good.

A second good reason (and possibly a better reason) that there are no good Earth images from Hubble is because Hubble orbits the Earth at about 5 miles per second (at a relatively low altitude, as mentioned above), and Hubble is not designed to be able to track something moving that fast relative to its field of view. It has tracking capabilities, but not for relative motion that is so fast.

By the way, not all of Google Sky's images are from Hubble. Some are from ground-based telescopes. And with Hubble being so close to Earth, its position may as well be considered a ground-based telescope relative to the things it images.




edit on 3/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo


Note the word 'manually' and the involvement of an astronaut there.

What about it. Manual "Motor drive", apparently driven by a Mikita drill.


So its possible.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 10:13 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Hubble tracks by using reaction wheels and thrusters to move itself — its whole self, the entire telescope — just like that tracking system for the camera on the shuttle was moving the entire camera.

You really can’t move a part of the insides of the Hubble (instead of moving the entire Hubble) to track the Earth that is appearing to move so fast under it.

The objects that Hubble images are so far away that the apparent motion between Hubble and the object is so slight that tracking orientation would be slow movements.


edit on 3/12/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

aliens



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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originally posted by: dan121212
Maybe a silly question but, why is it when you search for earth in google earth sky, you get no results?


Because you're using the wrong thing.

Seriously. If you want to look at the Earth, then use Google Earth.

Google Earth uses satellite, aircraft and of course ground images that put together what you get to see for Earth.

Google Sky is for viewing the sky and what's out there.

You can use Google Moon and Google Mars also to look more into detail for them.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 09:09 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
a reply to: intrptr

Hubble tracks by using reaction wheels and thrusters to move itself — its whole self, the entire telescope — just like that tracking system for the camera on the shuttle was moving the entire camera.

You really can’t move a part of the insides of the Hubble (instead of moving the entire Hubble) to track the Earth that is appearing to move so fast under it.

The objects that Hubble images are so far away that the apparent motion between Hubble and the object is so slight that tracking orientation would be slow movements.


But movements, nonetheless. Accomplished with fine servo step motors, computer controlled, for long exposures. For short exposures (like towards earth) with precision shutters and tracking , also computer controlled....very possible.



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Can't believe I'm the only one that starred you for that.

Kids nowadays...



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

because he's stating the obvious, im not thick i know google earth has earth moon mars etc just would be nice to see earth as im flying around in google sky



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: dan121212
a reply to: intrptr

because he's stating the obvious, im not thick i know google earth has earth moon mars etc just would be nice to see earth as im flying around in google sky


Not directed at you, I was grateful he said it, for me.
edit on 4-12-2017 by intrptr because: spelling




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