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Its been complete hell- How police used a traffic stop to take 91800 dollars from an innocent man

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posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:24 PM
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Anyone up for reading a positive story tonight? A story where common sense and justice prevail?

Back in March Phil Parhamovich was making a trip, driving through Wyoming, when he was first followed then stopped by Wyoming Highway Patrol for improperly lane and seat belt use.

The patrol officer called Phil back to the patrol car for answering questions, and that's when Phil made the mistake which led to civil forfeiture.

At one point, the officer asked Parhamovich if he had a long list of items in his car — specific drugs, a weapon, a large amount of cash, and so on. With the way the question was phrased, Parhamovich said he was worried that answering “yes” would make things worse, since it could wrongfully imply he had illegal drugs in his car. He also became concerned, since he was questioned about cash and illegal drugs at the same time, that it was potentially against the law to carry so much cash at once. (It is not.)

Police brought in a drug-sniffing dog. According to Parhamovich, an officer used a ball to lure the dog to the car and get the canine to act up — and justify a search.

The officers now on the scene found Parhamovich’s cash. Both worried that carrying so much money was illegal and concerned that saying it was his would seem like he lied to cops before, Parhamovich said the money was a friend’s. He declined to say who that friend was — since, in reality, the friend didn’t exist, and the cash was his own.


Phil had freaked, lied, wasn't aware of his rights and fell for the intimidation tactics which then led to him signing a waiver (of ownership of the cash) just to end the encounter and get the hell out of there. Essentially, an innocent man talked himself into being a criminal out of fear and ignorance. The highway patrol took full advantage!

But now police had found it. At this point, officers presented a waiver to Parhamovich. It stated that the signer would “desire to give this property or currency, along with any and all interests and ownership that I may have in it, to the State of Wyoming, Division of Criminal Investigation, to be used for narcotics law enforcement purposes. If the property or currency cannot be used for narcotics law enforcement purposes, I desire that the property or currency be disposed of as the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation sees fit, in accordance with law.”


Given that Parhamovich was not accused of any drug-related crimes (or any serious crimes at all), it’s not clear why narcotics law enforcement funding is relevant. But it was the out that the officers offered. “Okay, we’re going to let you go as long as you sign this waiver,” Parhamovich recalled an officer saying. “I asked them a bunch of times what it was, and what happens if I don’t sign it,” Parhamovich added. “I couldn’t get a clear answer and was extremely worried. So finally I signed it and left.”


Phil fought the ruling but naturally the state wasn't simply going to give Phil his money back:

The State disagrees with your characterization of what transpired during the March 13, 2017, traffic stop and will not return the currency to you at this time. First and foremost, at the time of the stop, you denied having any interest in the currency, and also stated you were completely unaware it was hidden inside the portable speaker located in your vehicle. Second, your claim that the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation (DCI) obtained your waiver of interest in that currency through either improper or illegal means is not accurate.


The article goes on to review several other occurrences where civil forfeiture was enforced via having innocent people sign waivers.

As for Phil Parhamovich, he began working with the Institute for Justice who got the ruling overturned - one of the lucky ones!

Just hours after this story was published, a judge, with the backing of state legislators who read Vox’s reporting, ruled in favor of Phil Parhamovich — and he will get his $91,800 back. “My gut has been clenched for a long time. I feel like it is still going to take some time to unwind and unclench,” Parhamovich said. “But I feel incredible. It hasn’t even sunk in yet.” He thanked the Institute for Justice, an advocacy group, for taking his case and Vox for reporting on it.


Stand up for yourself - Know your rights - DO NOT SIGN ANYTHING just to get out of a stressful situation
Source - Vox


edit on 2226x6722America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago12 by six67seven because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:35 PM
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a reply to: six67seven


Parhamovich


RUSSIANS!!!



In all seriousness, I do wonder why someone would keep $91,000 “hidden inside the portable speaker”...

Doesn’t exactly scream legit, but maybe I’m just being overly cynical.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: Hazardous1408

and anyone who does have $91,000 hidden in a portable speaker in his car and then denies that it`s his money is probably too stupid to even be allowed to keep that much money.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:48 PM
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First of all, who carries that kind of cash in their car? Where did he get the cash? I would be skeptical even though I knew someone who died from starvation with over a million bucks hid all over in the house. The cops gave the money to the court system, it did get to the heirs, well, the court and lawyers handling it probably took a third or more of the money.

I knew people who would carry a couple of grand on them all the time, but not this much. Who would hide the money in a speaker, that would be the first thing that a crook breaking into the car would steal.

edit on 2-12-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: bluechevytree
a reply to: Hazardous1408

and anyone who does have $91,000 hidden in a portable speaker in his car and then denies that it`s his money is probably too stupid to even be allowed to keep that much money.



That's so weird.....when people deny that discovered illegal drugs aren't theirs, the cops NEVER believe them and I think, it is common practice to automatically assign ownership to the driver of the vehicle unless they are able to pin in on an occupant. Funny how that doesn't work with uh, CASH.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: six67seven

God I hate Wyoming so much.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:01 PM
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originally posted by: StoutBroux

originally posted by: bluechevytree
a reply to: Hazardous1408

and anyone who does have $91,000 hidden in a portable speaker in his car and then denies that it`s his money is probably too stupid to even be allowed to keep that much money.



That's so weird.....when people deny that discovered illegal drugs aren't theirs, the cops NEVER believe them and I think, it is common practice to automatically assign ownership to the driver of the vehicle unless they are able to pin in on an occupant. Funny how that doesn't work with uh, CASH.





Classic.

edit on 2-12-2017 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: Hazardous1408

This particular guy, Phil, travels a lot as a musician and had been saving up to purchase a studio. Instead of leaving the cash at his home that he rents, where it's common to have maintenance workers around, he thought it was best to keep it close.

He lied to the highway patrol when they asked if he had any drugs, a large amount of cash, etc., thinking that would be the end of it. Then the patrol brought in the dog and used a ball to ensure the dog got excited, "justifying" a search of Phil's car. So when they found the cash, he thought he would be in bigger trouble if he then admitted it was his money because he would be caught in a lie....the rest is history.

He messed up, but that's still no valid reason to have your cash seized by the state. The state doesn't like to acknowledge 'simple mistakes' so he had to fight to get what was rightfully his back - and the Institute for Justice helped him accomplish that.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:07 PM
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$91,800 hidden in a speaker and he lied and said it was not his. I can't say I blame the officers for not believing him and thinking it was contraband. People simply do not carry that kind of cash cross country if there is no reason to hide it.

Color me skeptical of this guys story about the music studio. There is some reason he did not want to put it in a bank. I'd not be surprised if that was entirely made up after the fact.

Enter the IRS. I doubt this is over for him.

I've been through that route more than a few times, been pulled over and the cops were just fine to deal with, although that was years ago. Never a ticket, just a warning and I did not exactly look like a family son in those days.

I'd imagine if they are pulling people over from other area's when they can, it's because of the legal weed in Colorado.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:08 PM
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a reply to: six67seven

Has he never heard of savings account?
Much safer.


He messed up, but that's still no valid reason to have your cash seized by the state


Absolutely, 100% agree with you.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:11 PM
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I should have mentioned I'm absolutely opposed to seizing property until after a person has been charged and convicted, but I'm still skeptical of this guys story.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: Hazardous1408

but banks get robbed!, surely it was wiser to keep that much cash in a car speaker because cars never get robbed or stolen. I think phil is either retarded or a drug dealer.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:16 PM
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Dogs only have a 50% accuracy rate, meaning a good lawyer you can beat the case. Been lawyers succeeding there have been.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 10:17 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

I thought you yanks like us had the presumption of innocence. Secondly why the insistence on the signing of the waivers, if the LEO's were on solid ground?



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 11:04 PM
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me thinks the guy needs to start taking his money to the laundromat once in awhile...
maybe find one of those rich and famous people experienced in the art of cleaning their money and get a few tips.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 06:10 AM
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Legal Hiway Robbery. Unlawful search and seizure.

No warrant, due process, or cause to search the vehicle.

They get by that with a 'drug sniffing' dog that, for these purposes, isn't considered a police officer unless you injure it trying to defend yourself from being mauled.

Have anything illegal?
Mind if we 'look around'?

Coercion, intimidation, manipulation.

None of which is lawful under the constitution.

Shame on the people here siding with the "Law". They're criminal too.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 06:11 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: Blaine91555

I thought you yanks like us had the presumption of innocence. Secondly why the insistence on the signing of the waivers, if the LEO's were on solid ground?

They weren't. Having cash isn't a crime.

A 'permission' slip is.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 06:25 AM
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a reply to: Blaine91555


$91,800 hidden in a speaker and he lied and said it was not his. I can't say I blame the officers for not believing him and thinking it was contraband. People simply do not carry that kind of cash cross country if there is no reason to hide it.

What "People"? Because you don't, nobody does?

Cash isn't contraband, contraband is illegal drugs, stolen goods, Cuban cigars, whatever. Cash is only 'connected' to illegal activity by law enforcement on the hi way, without any prior record, without probable cause, because they want to steal it. They even admit it.


...I desire that the property or currency be disposed of as the Wyoming Division of Criminal Investigation sees fit...


Theres been no probable cause to search, confiscate and keep anything, let alone do whatever they see fit, without a hearing before a judge. Which if they had done would have been returned to him , which happened eventually.

I can hear the cops clapping the hi way thief on the back, "better luck next time, pardner"!



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Shame indeed.

Seems as though they are deeming him guilty until proven innocent.

The brainwashing has taken effect.

You know its working because they dont even realize what they’re implying.

That and you can tell NO ONE completely read the article.



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: six67seven


Seems as though they are deeming him guilty until proven innocent.

Long live the King.

Suspicion is the excuse, 'enforcers' determine what due process is.



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