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Primordial Black Holes

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posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:18 AM
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"We know very well that black holes can be formed by the collapse of large stars, or as we have seen recently, the merger of two neutron stars," said Savvas Koushiappas, an associate professor of physics at Brown University and coauthor of the study with Avi Loeb from Harvard University. "But it's been hypothesized that there could be black holes that formed in the very early universe before stars existed at all. That's what we're addressing with this work."



The idea is that shortly after the Big Bang, quantum mechanical fluctuations led to the density distribution of matter that we observe today in the expanding universe. It's been suggested that some of those density fluctuations might have been large enough to result in black holes peppered throughout the universe. These so-called primordial black holes were first proposed in the early 1970s by Stephen Hawking and collaborators but have never been detected -- it's still not clear if they exist at all.


For example, primordial black holes fall into a category of entities known as MACHOs, or Massive Compact Halo Objects. Some scientists have proposed that dark matter -- the unseen stuff that is thought to comprise most of the mass of the universe -- may be made of MACHOs in the form of primordial black holes. A detection of primordial black holes would bolster that idea, while a non-detection would cast doubt upon it.

The only other possible explanation for black hole mergers at redshifts greater than 40 is that the universe is "non-Gaussian." In the standard cosmological model, matter fluctuations in the early universe are described by a Gaussian probability distribution. A merger detection could mean matter fluctuations deviate from a Gaussian distribution.


www.sciencedaily.com...

So here we have the theoretical implication that Black Holes can be related to Dark Matter.

Further reading.

en.wikipedia.org...

Thoughts?
edit on 2-12-2017 by Kashai because: Added content




posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:25 AM
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I didn't read your links but perhaps it's possible black holes create dark matter and that the intense gravity of the black hole contains everything except that which dark matter is comprised of...
Because all that is left actually repels itself and everything else away from it...
Pure anti gravity or anti matter if you will...
Hense the expansion of the Universe...
edit on 2-12-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:29 AM
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a reply to: Kashai



So here we have the theoretical implication that Black Holes can be related to Dark Matter.

Interesting theory and thanks for posting
But
Dark matter is dead or not needed anymore.. go to 1:50 minute mark for a short blurb or do a search for the latest news on Dark matter.. youtu.be...



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:31 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

Without Dark Matter pretty much every Galaxy in what we comprehend today as the Universe would fall apart.



Dark Matter is your Freind



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:33 AM
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posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:37 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

It's force is thought to be repulsive because it is not believed to be diluted by expansion...



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

I would offer for the sake of argument that dark matter while observable today was once a component outside our past comprehension of the Universe. What the capacity to allow an object the size of what is essentially our solar system to as well move stars ar 600mps across an expanse of in the case of the Milky Way, 100,000 light years in circumference?

Then, of course, there are the variations in respect to the Local Group.


edit on 2-12-2017 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:52 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

Well to me it is due to weak forces and strong forces acting upon each other which are also opposed to one another...
This to me is evidenced by the cyclical movements...
It's what really causes the spin we are in...
But that's just me projecting my viewpoint...



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:54 AM
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Primordial Black Holes

Primordial black holes are hypothetical black holes that formed under conditions of extreme density in the very early universe. Studying primordial black holes provides a probe into both high energy physics and cosmology, setting limits on several cosmological parameters.


www.astro.umd.edu...


A primordial black hole is a hypothetical type of black hole formed during the high-density, inhomogeneous phase of the Big Bang due to the gravitational collapse of important density fluctuations. The concept was first proposed in 1971 by Stephen Hawking, who introduced the idea that black holes may exist that are smaller than stellar mass,[1] and are thus not formed by stellar gravitational collapse. Several mechanisms have been proposed to produce the inhomogeneities at the origin of primordial black hole formation—such as that of cosmic inflation, reheating, or phase transitions.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 01:57 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

What happens to the spin in your postulate when it confronts gravity well?



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:04 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

Well I suppose that would depend on the distance from the source of the gravitational well...
But I'm saying I believe it is not only mass which created said well...



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:08 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle



Physics cannot describe what happens inside a black hole. There, current theories break down, and general relativity collides with quantum mechanics, creating what's called a singularity or a point at which the equations spit out infinities.

But some advanced physics theories are trying to bridge the gap between general relativity and quantum mechanics, understand what's truly going on inside the densest objects in the universe. Recently, scientists applied a theory called loop quantum gravity to the case of black holes and found that inside these objects, space and time may be extremely curved, but that gravity there is not infinite, as general relativity predicts.


www.space.com...
edit on 2-12-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

Yeah that's because in my opinion like I'm trying to tell you the gravitational force is so strong that it breaks down everything in doing so alters it...Until all that is left is that which is opposed to gravity...
That's dark matter...
And it is also plausible for there to be no gravitational effects in the center...
Sort of like the eye of a hurricane nice and calm...
edit on 2-12-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle




Until all that is left is that which is opposed to gravity... That's dark matter...

No. That has nothing to do with dark matter.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:21 AM
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a reply to: Phage

The universe appears to be made of a mysterious, invisible substance called dark matter one third... And a force that repels gravity known as dark energy two thirds...

National geographic

The rest us just my own ideas I've admitted as much...

edit on 2-12-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:23 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

That time you got it right.

But neither has anything to do with black holes. Unless that black hole is composed of degenerate dark matter. Which it doesn't have to be.


edit on 12/2/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

Obviously, this is kind of part 2 thing.

How precisely would one define a center in five dimensions?

www.youtube.com...

edit on 2-12-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: Phage

I'm just saying to me it's a possibility for the creation of dark matter...
Why would it have to be degenerate in your opinion?



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:29 AM
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a reply to: Kashai

Well we would have a very hard time perceiving that wouldn't we...
All we would be able to do if possible and correct in our guess that the gravity is not infinite there or altogether absent is define it's parameters by observing the change in gravitational forces...
edit on 2-12-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 02:30 AM
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a reply to: 5StarOracle

How would matter from a black hole escape?


Why would it have to be degenerate in your opinion?
Because, at "infinite density", matter as we know it cannot exist.



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