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Europe appears to want its own X-37b, the Space Rider

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posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 04:17 PM
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ESA has put out the first contracts for a reusable space plane for 36.7 million euros. The space plane, named Space Rider, is meant to carry payloads of 800 kg and have an on orbit time of up to two months. The space rider is to fly by 2020 if goals are met. There is talk of a longer endurance and more. The space rider is to be derived from the IXV demonstrator. There is also talk of privatization circa 2025.

It sure sounds like an X-37b...even with the privatization talk.

spacenews.com...




posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 04:58 PM
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Wonder how much work to retrofit the Russian shuttles.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 05:10 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger
They would have to scrape off the rat turds first, then finish building them.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: Nickn3 The X37-b is nowhere near the size of the Russian shuttle. Either way I think it will benefit the ESA scientifically and on the military aspect. This will be interesting to follow.




posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 09:29 PM
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Europe would be wiser to invest the money in developing a reusable first stage. They're pouring money into developing an Ariane 6 with expendable solid-fueled boosters and an expendable liquid-fueled core stage. It's basically designed to spread jobs around the EU (the boosters alone contain major components manufactured in 4 different EU countries), and there's no way it is going to be able to compete with re-usable boosters (and potentially 2nd stages) from the likes of SpaceX and Blue Origin.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: Blackfinger

Way too much. You'd gave to resurrect the energia launcher as well.

And why would Europe want to give the Russians another bit of tech? Or resuscitate one as it may be.



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: PhloydPhan

They never have been major players and they never will be. Too many chiefs in anything EU.



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: anzha
a reply to: Blackfinger

Way too much. You'd gave to resurrect the energia launcher as well.

And why would Europe want to give the Russians another bit of tech? Or resuscitate one as it may be.


I am silently hoping it was a tongue in cheek comment.

Ariane 5 is a heavy lift though right, would you need such a big rocket for an 800kg payload plus x tonne space plane?

I think they all know something, or are beginning to figure out what the X-37b does and why Europe needs one, if you are sending a space plane up with an 800kg payload why not just make the payload 900kg with some boosters to put itself in orbit, like mentioned above, the deployment of the device isnt the cost, its the vehicle to get it there which is still needed to get the space plane there?



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 05:13 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

I think they all know something, or are beginning to figure out what the X-37b does and why Europe needs one, if you are sending a space plane up with an 800kg payload why not just make the payload 900kg with some boosters to put itself in orbit
, mmmm... and what in your opinion then do you think the X-37B really is or what capability it represents? I would be interested to know your thoughts.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 06:52 AM
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I'm curious who ESA puts bids out to to build rockets. Do they not rely completely on Airbus? I really don't know and just looking for some clarity. Anyone?



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: thebozeian
a reply to: Forensick

I think they all know something, or are beginning to figure out what the X-37b does and why Europe needs one, if you are sending a space plane up with an 800kg payload why not just make the payload 900kg with some boosters to put itself in orbit
, mmmm... and what in your opinion then do you think the X-37B really is or what capability it represents? I would be interested to know your thoughts.



Mate my thoughts are like a hobo dreaming of a new space race and waking up soaking in p1ss punching thin air! or my wife if she is in the way!

What I actually think is a tethered comms relay in case of war.

Or, and a deployable and deniable explosive satellite that can knock out standard gps sats years after its launch, then fly back and replace them.

Reason I think its up there so long, put 20 up and do nothing until war.....they are testing reliability.

Sleeper Cells.
edit on 2 12 2017 by Forensick because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

The truth behind many of the X-37B missions has been given and ignored, because people find it boring as hell. It's nothing to do with blowing up satellites, or dropping Rods From God, or any of a dozen other guesses. Since it isn't, people don't care about the truth.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 09:51 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Forensick

The truth behind many of the X-37B missions has been given and ignored, because people find it boring as hell. It's nothing to do with blowing up satellites, or dropping Rods From God, or any of a dozen other guesses. Since it isn't, people don't care about the truth.


Rods from God. Lol. Maybe on Mars. With Earth's atmosphere, kinda defeats the purpose.

Was anyone else confused by the "IXV" demonstrator? My first thought was Roman numerals, and I went cross eyed.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 05:32 PM
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a reply to: LogicalGraphitti

The general contractor for the Ariane 5 is ArianeGroup, which is a joint venture between Airbus and a French defense contractor called Safran. One way or another, most of the Ariane 5 is built by Airbus, either by a division of the company or a wholly-owned subsidiary. The one notably exception are the large solid rocket boosters on the Ariane 5, which are built by - wait for it - Safran. Safran also builds submarine-launched ballistic missiles for the French Navy, and these share a good bit of technology with the Ariane 5 SRBs.

The general contractor for Vega, Europe's booster for small (300 to 2,500 kg) satellites, is Avio, an Italian company. It has three solid propellant stages and a fourth liquid stage that is mostly used for final positioning of satellites. All the stages are built by Avio. Vega had a fairly protracted development (begun in 1998, first flight in 2012).

Ariane 6, as currently designed, will also have ArianeGroup as a general contractor. Airbus will built the liquid core stage. Avio will supply the 2 or 4 (depending on version) solid rocket boosters, which will be based largely on the Vega first stage.

Most of the above information was mostly gleaned from lurking in this thread over at the NASA Spaceflight forum.

Most of ESA's development projects involve the same cast of characters as above. The Space Rider project which is the subject of this thread is being developed by Avio and Thales Alenia Space, a Belgian company. The Prometheus rocket engine, which is a methane/oxygen engine, is a joint project between Airbus and Safran.




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