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Totally qualified expert Kellyanne Conway will solve the nation's opioid crisis

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posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

She COULD do that, but looking at her history within the Trump administration she acts as a Trump "Yes" woman. No matter what he says, she agrees with him and will pull out a jackhammer to scrape that barrel bottom to do it too. So I just see her as a sheep that will go along with whatever the bigger heads want to do. In this case, likely Sessions. And if she doesn't want to agree with Sessions, he can just turn around and get Trump on his side then she'll jump on board faster than you can say "political suckup".




posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:28 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Vasa Croe


Well, we had a military and LEO lifer, then a recovering alcoholic prior to now....how is it exactly that they were qualified anymore than Conway? I find it funny that you think there is some expert opinion that will fix the issue across the board and can be implemented widely.

HA! The solution is blindingly in our faces and is beyond easy to implement.
How Medical Marijuana Could Help End the Opioid Epidemic

Where have you been?


And not sure how your rights are being infringed right now.

So there isn't a single part of the Constitution that entitles the government to tell you what substances you can or cannot put into your body. The fact that the war on drugs exists shows that Constitutional law was manipulated from it's original source material to reason that this was legal. Originally they had to use stamps and required you to own a stamp to buy drugs. Then they just stopped issuing the stamps. Then they just stopped pretending and started the war on drugs.

There is NOTHING on the up-and-up on the history of the war on drugs. It is the biggest farce against the people our government has EVER undertaken against its people.


Never have been for laws on drugs. Your body, your choice is my thought. I just don't do them or haven't with any regular schedule so it never has really mattered to me.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:32 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

I've watched friends be destroyed by them and there are others who function just well on them. One thing about opiates is that there is a LOT of corruption involved with pushing them to the public from major pharmaceutical companies like Bayer.

What we need is a doctor versed in drug policy history and who is open to experimental treatments like medical cannabis to be the drug czar. Then Trump needs to listen to that person's advice. Those are two TALL orders coming from the Trump administration. And with Kellyanne in charge Trump might as well have struck out with the first swing.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Trump thinks the problem is heroin coming from Mexico. Therefore that's what Kellyanne pushes.
They're both woefully uninformed. I'd even dare to say that one of them doesn't really give a flying # either.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Good God. It has nothing to do with Obama.
The ignorance being advanced in this thread is amazing.

No one here is going to solve this that's for sure..
So sad...



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Yeah. Real talk, I don't see our drug problem improving over the 4 - 8 years that Trump could be in office.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:46 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Vasa Croe

I've watched friends be destroyed by them and there are others who function just well on them. One thing about opiates is that there is a LOT of corruption involved with pushing them to the public from major pharmaceutical companies like Bayer.

What we need is a doctor versed in drug policy history and who is open to experimental treatments like medical cannabis to be the drug czar. Then Trump needs to listen to that person's advice. Those are two TALL orders coming from the Trump administration. And with Kellyanne in charge Trump might as well have struck out with the first swing.


Why a doctor is what I'm asking? Just because someone is a doctor doesn't mean they know how to combat drug abuse or have any knowledge of pharmaceutical companies. Doctors, typically, are very single track brains. That is why most are not good with business or economics. They are highly trained in a specific area of medicine and that is all they can do.

It's like the CEO of a company like UPS for example. The CEO isn't on a delivery truck handing out packages and isn't flying the plane for worldwide delivery. He/she is there because they have a 10000 foot view of the process and hire others under them with specific knowledge and training to handle the tasks needed for the company to run smoothly.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:50 AM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Vasa Croe

I've watched friends be destroyed by them and there are others who function just well on them. One thing about opiates is that there is a LOT of corruption involved with pushing them to the public from major pharmaceutical companies like Bayer.

What we need is a doctor versed in drug policy history and who is open to experimental treatments like medical cannabis to be the drug czar. Then Trump needs to listen to that person's advice. Those are two TALL orders coming from the Trump administration. And with Kellyanne in charge Trump might as well have struck out with the first swing.


Why a doctor is what I'm asking? Just because someone is a doctor doesn't mean they know how to combat drug abuse or have any knowledge of pharmaceutical companies. Doctors, typically, are very single track brains. That is why most are not good with business or economics. They are highly trained in a specific area of medicine and that is all they can do.

Actually I listed some specific qualifications. A "doctor versed in drug policy history". That requires that the doctor has political knowledge too. Also, anyone with a phd is a doctor... You don't need to be a medical doctor to be a doctor. I would prefer a research doctor myself.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: Vasa Croe

Good God. It has nothing to do with Obama.
The ignorance being advanced in this thread is amazing.

No one here is going to solve this that's for sure..
So sad...


How does it have nothing to do with Obama? I'd say you're correct in that he didn't personally run the program, but with your logic then it has nothing to do with Trump unless your position is that this opioid crisis just hit in the last 10 months.

And no...it can't be solved at all....simply because there isn't any single solution that works for everyone.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Sillyolme

Yeah. Real talk, I don't see our drug problem improving over the 4 - 8 years that Trump could be in office.


Did you really pull the partisan card in this thread? If you wanna go that route, let's pull up campaign donations from Big Pharma and see who's getting the money.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:54 AM
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a reply to: Middleoftheroad

If you have them, post them. The war on drugs being ended is my biggest government priority and I hold politicians accountable on both sides of the aisle for not doing more to speak out against it. I'm not pulling a partisan card when I talk about Trump here. I feel like for all that Obama didn't do to end the war on drugs, it will look like Obama moved mountains on this policy after Trump is done. THAT'S how misinformed Trump is on this policy direction. Appointing Kellyanne as the drug czar is just another symptom of what I'm describing here.
edit on 30-11-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I'd go for someone with a pharmacy background. They know more about the drugs and they have a bigger view when it comes to overprescription. They're also the ones directly dealing with things like pill mills.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:09 AM
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a reply to: Xcalibur254

I thought about that too, but I'm worried that a person like that would be on the pharmaceutical companies' payrolls. Then we'd just see more of the same.

But yeah, you are right. Some sort of pharmaceutical knowledge would be needed. That may be something that would be unavoidable and you'd just have to rely on the person making the decision to choose the best person. Unfortunately that person is Donald Trump.
edit on 30-11-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:27 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Middleoftheroad

If you have them, post them. The war on drugs being ended is my biggest government priority and I hold politicians accountable on both sides of the aisle for not doing more to speak out against it. I'm not pulling a partisan card when I talk about Trump here. I feel like for all that Obama didn't do to end the war on drugs, it will look like Obama moved mountains on this policy after Trump is done. THAT'S how misinformed Trump is on this policy direction. Appointing Kellyanne as the drug czar is just another symptom of what I'm describing here.


Yes, ending the war on drugs we are in agreement on. But to claim any politician has cared about the opioid crisis is absurd. I just follow the money and the money is being doled out on both sides of the aisle. They literally have people line up each morning for their dose of Methadone/Suboxone for heroine addiction. How is giving them a prescribed opioid that the medical industry can make money off of, be considered trying to fix the problem? Seems to me they want to continue the cycle to gather their fair share of the money these addicts are spending. It's disgusting!



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

of course Trump mentalists will argue it's a good post to appoint Conway. has there been any move by Trump that was a bad one to them so dar? or anything he's said?

it's the same psychological traits which convince cult members their leaders are always right, even when its a lie or contradictory actions.

its like this in religion, cults, gangs, now American politics.
and the partisanship syndrome is too clever to let them us rational. Conway could have been appointed chief of staff tomorrow or in charge of of fed reserve, you would get the same replies.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:31 AM
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I would think Trump could find a better person to deal with this epidemic.

That is all.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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The only thing that qualifies her to comment is that she looks and sounds strung out most of the time.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 09:01 AM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: CriticalStinker

Another one. It's not a heroin problem. Yes that exist too but the problem is drugs that are manufactured and prescribed here. It's pills hot needles.
How can we solve this problem if we can't even identify it.
Get it out of your heads that this is a social issue. It's not. It's a medical issue that doctors have created with their signature. It's not the down and out behind a building with a rubber tourniquet, a spoon and a match.
Until we own it we won't help these folks.
A few years ago the VA decided that my best friend who had been prescribed opioids since coming back from Iraq would no longer be providing the pills. They gave her Tylenol instead. Yup.
Well we got through that but it wasn't easy. The VA is responsible for a lot of this problem.
The drugs are available on the street after doctors decide it's time to stop them. That is where the problem is because the street drugs are not pure and contain killer fentynol (SP) n them.

Maybe you need to get a clue in some respects.
I live near Reading, PA and there are plenty of heroin junkies using needles to shoot JUNK into their arms, legs or wherever they have a good vein.
I am not saying that there isn't a prescription opioid problem, just that are still a pile of heroin junkies around. What do you think the prescription addicts do when the doctor cuts them off? They go into town and buy some crap, that who knows what it has in it, fentanyl or some other synthetic drug that is so powerful that first responders are at risk of OD when they get some of it on their skin.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: Middleoftheroad

I'm not claiming that any politician cares about it. I know damn well they don't care about it. The pharma companies have them wrapped around their little finger. We are merely lucky Purdue Pharma was sued over their shady advertising in the 90's. Too bad the damage was done and a generation of doctors went on to prescribe opiates hand over fist.


How is giving them a prescribed opioid that the medical industry can make money off of, be considered trying to fix the problem? Seems to me they want to continue the cycle to gather their fair share of the money these addicts are spending. It's disgusting!

Forcing someone to quit cold turkey can have negative effects on a person's health. With alcohol it can even kill you. Luckily opiates don't do that, but part of what makes quitting so hard is the detox you go through is super rough. If easing the symptoms some with mild dosages helps keep recidivism rates down then great.

Obviously there will be people abusing the system, but since you are only giving out small quantities they don't get much of a fix anyways.

More on the Purdue Pharma saga:
OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma Hit With Unprecedented Lawsuit by Washington City
Seriously, # these guys!
edit on 30-11-2017 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: bgerbger

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: bgerbger




Nothing to do with opiate users stopping using their drug of choice.


You never addressed this: Who are you to tell someone else what to do with their own bodies?

Just because it makes you feel better about yourself isn't a good reason.


Perhaps I phrased that incorrectly, as I don't tell people what to do with their bodies, but I would allow their addiction to be looked at as a health matter, not one of law-enforcement. Sessions is a heavy handed law-and-order proponent, and Conway backs his words.

Harm reduction tries to reduce risk with the ultimate goal of the users being able to cease their addiction on their own terms. It's not always successful, but better to give them a chance rather than lock them up, or leave them on the street with no viable treatment options.

This is why we have an epidemic.
Someone will always be there to take care of us when we make poor decisions.
What incentive does a drug addict have to never start in the first place?
Why they even have a drug to revive me when I OD nowadays.
I don't believe we need to put anyone in prison over using drugs.
We need to raise a generation that doesn't rely on a 'momma' government that will take care of us when we choose to do unwise things.


Remember that the opioids crisis was vastly a function of LEGAL drugs, prescribed by Doctors for pain, that people then became addicted to and thus the cycle began. Don't pretend it was a simple choice to shoot heroin or not - these folks were often brought into it by doctors and Big Pharma. The docs weren't trying to cause addiction necessarily, but they did little to prevent it or to use alternative methods of pain management.

If someone becomes an addict, to not treat their addiction because "they shouldn't have become addicted" is a form of unhelpful punishment. It does nothing to solve the problem that people may have innocently fallen into, and regardless of how they got there, shame is t a solution, neither is leaving them on their own to die.

There are things that can be done to staunch the crisis and then help those who are afflicted, but the WILL of our public "servants" must bend towards both compassion and funding of appropriate common sense measures to actively help or this will continue to spiral out of control.

It could have been you. Remember that. You could have found yourself with a herniated disc or injuries from an accident or post-surgical pain that required pain management. You could have been given amounts of opioids that caused your own body to become addicted.

In other words, this is t about willpower or "just say no" as neither are effective after someone is already addicted. Addiction treatment with proven outcomes would be the best path, and yes, mitigating further damage through attempting to stop the spread of infectious disease is also a good idea.

There but for the grace of God go all of us...




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