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The Next Ice Age.

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posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:27 PM
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We have a problem and while it will probably take about 1500 to 2000 years, we are headed to a full-scale Ice that lasts 10,000 years. Where mile high glaciers exit's along with, a line around the planet that starts somewhere around Southern Kentucky, literally. The situation really is inevitable and relates to the gravitational effect of the Moon and pretty much every other planet as far away as Jupiter.

One way of dealing with the problem would be to colonize our Solar System and collect material for the purpose of creating another object that orbits the Earth. This then correcting for the Wobble that results from not having such an object to correct what results in Ice ages on Earth

Thoughts?




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:28 PM
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a reply to: Kashai




Thoughts?


Bundle up!



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Apparently you didn’t get Al Gores global warming memo.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:32 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Great, there will be plenty of ice removal jobs. Oh it will be robotic and automated.

My question is can the glacial ice be removed and dumped in the far off future?



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:35 PM
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WEll it is a natural phenomenon and it is interesting how humanity seemed to be here in the safest points between catastrophic global events like major volcanoes, earthquakes, meteor strikes and other life killing events such as earth has seen in the past. The question is will man and protected species survive the future through intelligent evolution or be destined to be wiped out in the annals of history?



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:37 PM
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My hope is that we can come together to use the intelligence we were gifted with to soar into deep space, discover places beyond our wildest dreams where we can become more than just star seed from the dust of our extinction. IMHO it is our only hope for the very distant future as nothing lasts forever including this wonderfilled planet.
edit on pm1130pmMon, 27 Nov 2017 19:39:54 -0600 by antar because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:46 PM
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We have a problem and while it will probably take about 1500 to 2000 years,
We are currently in an ice age so I presume that you actually are talking about glacial periods. But no. It's doubtful that we will see another glacial period that soon. Even without the "help" of the CO2 we are pumping into the atmosphere, it will be quite a lot longer.

Most CO2 scenarios led to an exceptionally long interglacial from 5000 years before the present to 50,000 years from now, with the next glacial maximum in 100,000 years.

ftp.soest.hawaii.edu...


This then correcting for the Wobble that results from not having such an object to correct what results in Ice ages on Earth
Changes in obliquity are one part of the conditions which are thought to lead to glaciation. There are also changes in the Earth's orbit itself which affect insolation. (see the same source)

Your "helper" asteroid might make things worse rather than better, causing the Moon's orbit to shift.

edit on 11/27/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: whywhynot

Within 300 to 500 years oil could conceivably end up being valued to the extent it relates to sales in relation to Jewelry.

The issues of global warming will subside and be trying to keep this planet warm with pollution in the long run in probably unrealistic. The problem is not with our atmosphere. The problem is with the ability of our planet, too sustain its rotation to the extent one can grow mangos in Canada.

And that could in relation to modern physics involve placing an object about the size of Ceres in an orbit that results in a better, environment on Earth.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:56 PM
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originally posted by: Kashai
Thoughts?


Bring it on, and let nature sort out the stupid. If its inevitable then why do we care about trying to prevent anything? Billions will die. Society will die. Earth will reset and whatever species inhabits this dump gets a chance to destroy it just like we did. Woo!



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: Phage



Definition: "A period of time in the Earth's history when ice sheets and glaciers advanced from polar regions to cover areas previously in a temperate climate. Several ice ages are evident in the geological record, the most recent ('The Ice Age') being from about 1 million years ago and lasting until about 10 000 years ago when the ice retreated to its present polar extent." (Taken From Webster's World Encyclopedia - 1997. Copyright Webster Publishing, and/or contributors.)
"The Ice Ages are generally seen as a time of glaciers, mainly because this is the Northern Hemisphere experience. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Ice Ages saw much smaller glaciers, and the main effect was for the weather to be cooler, and very much drier.

Nobody is really certain what causes an ice age to start, but one possibility is increased dust in the atmosphere, either from a volcano or from a large meteorite impact. This dust would then increase the world's albedo, cooling it down, and causing more snow and ice to form, increasing the earth's albedo still further.

The main problem with this theory is that we do not know what would then cause the Ice Age to finish. Maybe dead organic material, trapped under the ice, breaks down to form methane, or ocean currents switch, warming and melting the ice, or maybe it is something completely different.


unmaskingevolution.com...

As the saying goes, "there is more than one way to skin a cat." The way I see it is we are a response to the frequency of mass extinctions here.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: imthegoat

Given current human potential literally making sure something like that would happen because of the reasons you have offered, would really be stupid.

IMHO



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: Kashai
When conversing in a science forum, it is often preferable to use scientific terminology.

What is an ice age? An ice age is a long interval of time (millions to tens of millions of years) when global temperatures are relatively cold and large areas of the Earth are covered by continental ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Within an ice age are multiple shorter-term periods of warmer temperatures when glaciers retreat (called interglacials or interglacial cycles) and colder temperatures when glaciers advance (called glacials or glacial cycles).

geology.utah.gov...

We are currently in an ice age, experiencing an interglacial period. We left the last glacial period about 11,000 years ago.


edit on 11/27/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Phage



Definition: "A period of time in the Earth's history when ice sheets and glaciers advanced from polar regions to cover areas previously in a temperate climate. Several ice ages are evident in the geological record, the most recent ('The Ice Age') being from about 1 million years ago and lasting until about 10 000 years ago when the ice retreated to its present polar extent." (Taken From Webster's World Encyclopedia - 1997. Copyright Webster Publishing, and/or contributors.)
"The Ice Ages are generally seen as a time of glaciers, mainly because this is the Northern Hemisphere experience. In the Southern Hemisphere, the Ice Ages saw much smaller glaciers, and the main effect was for the weather to be cooler, and very much drier.

Nobody is really certain what causes an ice age to start, but one possibility is increased dust in the atmosphere, either from a volcano or from a large meteorite impact. This dust would then increase the world's albedo, cooling it down, and causing more snow and ice to form, increasing the earth's albedo still further.

The main problem with this theory is that we do not know what would then cause the Ice Age to finish. Maybe dead organic material, trapped under the ice, breaks down to form methane, or ocean currents switch, warming and melting the ice, or maybe it is something completely different.

Between the 17th century and the late 19th century, the world went through a 'Little Ice Age', when temperatures were cool enough for significant glacier advances. This may have been caused by lower solar activity, or any of a range of other astronomical effects. Popular candidates for possible causes include slight changes in the earth's orbit, wobbles and precessions in the earth's spin, and maybe even the earth passing through clouds of stellar dust." (Written by Peter Macinnis - Taken From Webster's World Encyclopedia - 1997. Copyright Webster Publishing, and/or contributors.)


unmaskingevolution.com...

As to why these events happen is one thing the other is why we have no record of it happening before we record that these events, occurred.

However, by stabilizing our, rotation by re-creating conditions that, existed prior to 2300 million years ago would seem to make sense.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Your source is not exactly scientific. But it doesn't matter. I knew you were talking about glacial periods. If you want to use common rather than correct terminology, be my guest.




However, by stabilizing our, rotation by re-creating conditions that, existed prior to 2300 million years ago would seem to make sense.
2.3 billion years ago things were very different. The Sun was not as hot. Days were shorter. But I don't think we had two Moons. Hard to say though.


edit on 11/27/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

In consideration Earth prior to that time from the terrestrial point has the same problems as calderas or otherwise.

But still, we do not record any other Ice ages prior to the timescale offered.
edit on 27-11-2017 by Kashai because: Content edit



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: whywhynot

Thank you so much for that comment!
I've been waiting for a while to throw this out there somewhere..




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:52 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Clearly, I am offering ideas as to why but why would be a real issue in, addressing such a problem, realistically.

As in so far as when such an event will happen an issue is that it will happen.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 09:19 PM
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a reply to: Darkblade71

Happy to be of service.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Listen up everyone. This is how it ACTUALLY works.

The earth spins on it's axis and this axis has a wobble...a 100,000 year wobble to complete it's circuit. This wobble gradually tips the earth away from from the sun for 50,000 years gradually making it cooler and cooler culminating in a 12,500 yr. glacial period ( during the time when the earth is tilted farthest from the sun), with ice miles thick covering much of the northern hemishere...with this glacial period gradually ending as the wobble tips the earth back towards the sun wbich leads to a 12,500 year period of temperate weather before starting to turn cold again. We are currently at the end of the 12,500 year temperate period.
edit on 11/27/2017 by MissSmartypants because: edit

edit on 11/27/2017 by MissSmartypants because: edit



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 09:36 PM
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It's not inevitable if we are in a global heat extinction event.

It's due in about 10,000 years (the resumption of the ice age). At that time most of the carbon pollution will have been scrubbed out by geological weathering processes after the collapse of human population and human industrial societies at the end of peak oil and the eutrophication of the anoxic ocean layer.

Usually mass extinctions of which there have been six have a great release of carbon due to large magma events torching off coal. We don't currently have the magma events but we do have the carbon event.

How that effects the ice age is likely to make it much worse after our current warm interval in the middle of one.


a reply to: Kashai


edit on 27-11-2017 by BrawlPups because: cause



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