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What happened to all of the bugs? A 50 year observation from one location.

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posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: charlyv

Well pesticides, electronic bug killers, pollution all kill bugs, kill enough of them and they disappear.


I get that, but as obvious from other posts, down South it is like it was up here in the past. They certainly use pesticides and other methods to reduce them , but they still proliferate. Perhaps there is a line that gets crossed, where we do indeed wipe them out. I do not know, but they are important to other life, and when gone, that other life must be impacted, which is the scary consequence.
only a couple bats this year bugs are gone.....live deep in the woods.
I set out in the yard and didn't have to spray repellent, just enjoyed it never considered the consequences




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:03 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

I reside in southern Indiana between two national forests and the spider population is gone. Normally they would be crawling around the house and and making nests in the corners. Now there is not a single spider in any of the nooks and crannies. Has me wondering what is really going on?



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 08:55 PM
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originally posted by: madenusa

originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: charlyv

Well pesticides, electronic bug killers, pollution all kill bugs, kill enough of them and they disappear.


I get that, but as obvious from other posts, down South it is like it was up here in the past. They certainly use pesticides and other methods to reduce them , but they still proliferate. Perhaps there is a line that gets crossed, where we do indeed wipe them out. I do not know, but they are important to other life, and when gone, that other life must be impacted, which is the scary consequence.
only a couple bats this year bugs are gone.....live deep in the woods.
I set out in the yard and didn't have to spray repellent, just enjoyed it never considered the consequences


The bats are gone because of the lack of bugs.They eat huge amounts of them. You'd think the deep woods would be a good habitat.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 09:13 PM
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I miss butterflies, don't see them anymore where I live, only once in a blue moon. When I was young (30yrs ago) they were everywhere. The world is dying, and the reason is the human. Only a matter of time now.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: charlyv

I draw your attention to the ATS background shot showing as I post this.

Chemtrails.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: Guyfriday
a reply to: worldstarcountry


This may be more true than not. I was reading a report the other day that talked about a possible coming ice age. Of course in a world of global warming and climate change, nobody wants to think about an ice age, but the little ice age only ended a little over 100 years ago, and our current warm period is more of an anomaly then anything else. If we are going back into a nasty cooling trend in the northern hemisphere, then it would make sense for a lot of bugs to migrate south. I would suspect that the migration of insects will cause a lot of birds and mammals to head south as well.


Just a thought.



It is possible that bugs no how to prepare for an Ice age. The damn things can survive several hard freezes and pop out like crazy when it all is passed like magic.

I suspect the cause to be pesticides and Monsanto plants. I have some real world examples where i live that suggest Monsanto is playing a big part whatever the bug populations.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: worldstarcountry

While I appreciate there's a lot of bugs at your place, the truth is bugs have been disappearing for years.

There are studies about it.

Blame your friendly corporate Monsanto killers.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: Justoneman


They could just be heading south, though some could adapt by evolving, it's more likely that they are just moving to a better environment for their own survival.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 11:13 PM
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I hike constantly and I can tell you there is no lack of bugs here.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 12:39 AM
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originally posted by: toysforadults
I hike constantly and I can tell you there is no lack of bugs here.


Well that is not helpful at all. Where is here?

You could be in the midst of a rain forest and we be like ... dah, no kidding.

P



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 12:46 AM
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The past couple years, I have begun to notice how few birds I have been seeing as compared to when i was younger.

An interesting anecdote I caught at deer camp this year was some of the older hunters talking about how, after the gun companies were pushing bird guns, the populations of quail and pheasant has never recovered. One guy noted how he hadnt seen either in years.

Hearing this in an area where CWD has been found in deer and anyone with more than 5 acres (mostly farmers) can kill as many deer as they want until april 1st, 2018 is worrying. I get why the killathon is (likely) necessary, in this case, but I do see it biding very badly for years to come. Especially when wild game is one of the best ways for people to live off the land and not be as reliant on supermarkets.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 12:54 AM
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a reply to: charlyv
I have noticed a few bugs dead all over the place, sometimes in places they should technically be thriving and buzzing around, there drooping like fly's, and not just the fly's, but the bees, butterfly, moths, spiders, ant's by the score, even cockroaches, you name it, random dead insects all over the place.

But I don't think there going anywhere anytime soon. Just because you don't see them does not mean there not around.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 12:55 AM
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Also, this reminds me of the book Earth Abides (great read, by the by). In its, after most humans die from a superflu, other organisms come in waves as they try to work out a new biosphere/circle-of-life as humans are mostly our of the picture. Rats-fleas-flies-grasshoppers, etc... (not exactly I'm that order, but the book is lent out now)

It seems that the reverse is happening in the world today. Humans and their baggage are creating a world where sections of the plant and animal life are dying off. Only, at the moment, it is not as noticeable. It will be more noticeable as the current mass extinction gains traction.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 01:22 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

I don't believe it for second. They must have all moved to Indiana then. The past two years have been so bad I will be moving out west next year. The spiders are especially bad. I got so tired of walking to my car every day and it be covered in a cocoon of spider webs, walk through the woods and run into spider webs every ten feet. I don't even live out in the country. Nothing wrong with the insect population unfortunately. All they're doing is shifting around looking for better homes and a different population of people to annoy the hell out of.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 01:35 AM
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They all flew over to my house in BC

I for one have seen an increase due to the weather being warmer, I think.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 01:40 AM
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I think it’s the climate changing or going through a cycle where they migrate to a preferred climate.

I get grasshoppersc all summer now, I don’t live in a desert.its just been a lot hitter and drier. The average house fly I don’t see so much. Spiders are increasing.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 03:27 AM
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originally posted by: pheonix358

originally posted by: toysforadults
I hike constantly and I can tell you there is no lack of bugs here.


Well that is not helpful at all. Where is here?

You could be in the midst of a rain forest and we be like ... dah, no kidding.

P


Made me laugh. Good one mate!

kind regards,

bally



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 03:57 AM
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I've seen a similar drop-off in the number of insects where I live in VA. Very few lightening bugs, beetles, grasshoppers, garden spiders, gnats, butterflies, caterpillars, crickets, and lady bugs; compared to when I was a kid about 45 years ago.

Within the last five years, lady bugs have been almost completely supplanted by the invasive Asian stink bugs.

Of course there have been significant habitat changes in all those years. But I wouldn't expect those changes to have so radically altered the insect population.

My latitude is on the 37th parallel.

-dex



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: charlyv

This thread has a link in it www.abovetopsecret.com... to skynews report:

news.sky.com...

Don't know if you posted in that thread but the report is worth a read.

As to my experience, yes insects have declined rapidly over the last 20 years but I do live in London which is heavily populated and heavily industrialised but even in the parks that are still here, there are no wasps, bees, caterpillas, snails (Hardly), Butterflies, Moths. Not many flies either and I live right next to a park/forest so would expect to see a lot more. Also noticed a sharp drop with birds like your common Sparrow for instance has all but disappeared completely... seriously havn't seen any this year or Starlings, hardly any blackbirds either although we still got pidgeons. I remember there being loads of blue tits, great tits, gold tits, robins, greenfinch.... GONE. We still get spiders though unfortunately. If there's one insect I wouldn't mind gone forever, it's scary looking spiders but i guess we need them too, however without the other insects to feed on, i doubt they'll survive for much longer unless people start puttig trees and bush back into their gardens instead of concrete.

I'm not sure the globalists even realise what they've done tbh.

I've read Singapore is leading the way in bringing wildlife back to the cities:




posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 07:53 AM
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Well.. I hope all you folks who bought bug-zappers in the 90s are happy now!

On a more serious note.. doesn't seem much an issue in Denver, except we did notice a drop-off in mosquitoes, which we are not complaining about. Was sitting outside this weekend just watching the sun and what-not.. were a ton of insects flying around.

One thing I -did- notice a couple years back.. a bunch of small white praying mantis. I had never seen one in Colorado before (although I know they are around), so perhaps a change in the types of insects.. more predators culling the non-predator types.
edit on 28-11-2017 by fleabit because: (no reason given)




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