It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

What happened to all of the bugs? A 50 year observation from one location.

page: 4
57
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 02:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: Asktheanimals
I agree and have been watching bug for over 50 years. The first thing I noticed was less moths, then bees. Now it's beetles, butterflies, true bugs as well as large garden spiders like Golden garden spiders we used to see regularly. There are 3 new things introduced to the environment that likely play a role; neonicotinoids - insectide, GMO foods by Monsanto that contain unnatural chemicals and may act on the genetic basis of insects. Finally, we have the electromagnetic smog thanks to cell phones and wifi which act upon their navigational senses and disrupt migrations as well as their ability to find their way to food and back to the nest.

This is all technology we rushed out for the sake of profit before studying how it would affect the environment, including humans. This is the fatal flaw in Capitalism and Corporate control over it.


We need to prove it, but there is certainly evidence that this is a contributor. It is very scary and science has to step up to the issue and tell us the results of their tests, which they have certainly done, and may be suppressed by PTB.




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 02:47 PM
link   
Southern Maine, here.

I recently moved away from the city, but in the seven years I owned property there I can confirm there was a decline in bug populations... or at least how many I ran into.
Even the fruit flies weren't as bad near the end.

Out of the city, there are still bugs-a-plenty... but I can't compare it to ten years back. If there were thrice as many, I might actually understand why someone would move to the city on purpose- they can get pretty intense.

Of course, I blame the humans. We put poison in everything, even our own food. We spray the grass, monsanto makes food that is quite literally toxic.
We spew chemicals into the air from our exhaust pipes, and up here many of us burn oil for heat at home, dumping the exhaust into the air.
What bugs don't choke to death on our toxic plants or air are left to deal with us microwaving the landscape with cell towers, wifi, etc.

The bees you mentioned that died out in a year after being strong for 70 years?
Some nearby field probably sprayed insecticide, or maybe a new 4g cell tower went in.
Delicate little buggers, and we're killing them with no sign of slowing down.

Of course, we're also out-fishing the ocean almost as fast as we poison it, and de-foresting the rainforest faster than we can poison it.
the next 50 years will be sad- good thing I won't live through all of it. Sucks to be our species, though.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 02:57 PM
link   
a reply to: DerBeobachter




Poor childs of today, never saw animals live that lived here not long ago, some even never saw real snow in their life yet. I remember that we had snow for at least six to eight weeks every winter, now it´s, literally taken, six to eight minutes every winter, if it snows at all.


Another latitude and weather correlation . We had a few bad winters in the last 10, but I remember some days back in the 50's and 60's , when my dad opened the front door and it was snow to the roof. We had to tunnel out of our house!



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:01 PM
link   
Thanks for all who posted.
When this has run it's course , I want to tabulate somehow region, latitude, affected insects, weather, year of noticed occurrence... etc. A few more days, perhaps.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:26 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

5 years ago I noticed there are no butterflies. Last two years I did not see single swallow.

While this is wider problem, I start to see correlation with biofuel crops production - at least here in Czech republic.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:26 PM
link   
Our insects where I am at in northern Kansas/Missouri border seem fine.

But this year, we had no grackels. We've always had them previously. It's not that they died out or anything because I drive down to the south part of the city for work and they were down there. It's like they just didn't come this far north.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
Our insects where I am at in northern Kansas/Missouri border seem fine.

But this year, we had no grackels. We've always had them previously. It's not that they died out or anything because I drive down to the south part of the city for work and they were down there. It's like they just didn't come this far north.


Interesting. Grackles' diets consist mainly of insects and other invertebrates like goldfish, minnows, crayfish, small frogs, salamanders, mice, and small bats. Perhaps there is a certain insect no longer around, or one of those creatures is in short supply. I was reading that they also do not drink water, as they get enough from their diet. Frogs are another endangered animal here in Mass. , I did not hear any of them in the swamps, like in years before, but that could be another thread.
edit on 27-11-2017 by charlyv because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:45 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

This article relates to your intention to gather data.


In-depth monitoring only exists in select regions or for specific species. In Germany, only 37 insect species are closely tracked, according to the Federal Agency for Nature Conservation — a mere 0.12 percent of all species.

A recent increase of monitoring efforts stems from the rise of “citizen science” projects, where lay people with an interest in the outdoors are trained to collect data. One such project is a butterfly monitoring program run in association with Butterfly Conservation Europe. Each year, thousands of volunteers comb through the landscape to compile lists of butterflies they encounter.
What’s Causing the Sharp Decline in Insects, and Why It Matters




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:52 PM
link   
a reply to: Kandinsky

That is really interesting, thanks. Some real pro-active conservation awareness in Germany !
I will take a look at the data they are tracking. Obviously, they have done some homework.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:55 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Others have mentioned the articles and studies talking about declines, so I will simply add my anecdotal evidence.

Bugs have tremendously declined in central Oklahoma. I've seen a dozen butterflies this year, tops. There used to be hundreds in my backyard at times.

Bird populations seem to have declined as well; this is not too surprising for the insectivores.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 03:59 PM
link   
Central England rural location here and have noticed a major lack of insects, birds and even mouse kills by the cat this year. When walking through the local forests throughout the year they have been strangely quiet.

Even at harvest time I only saw one harvest fly, normally they are everywhere. Lack of wasps made bbqs great however...

Maybe this happens reasonably often but we take more notice because we are better connected?



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 05:29 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Maybe, but we had lots of grasshoppers, cicadas, mosquitos, etc., as per normal. There were even quite a few butterflies of various species around my patio plants. I couldn't keep the Japanese beetles off of my mini roses! Saw praying mantises, and pulled the usual complement of damsel fly and dragon fly nymphs out of my patio pond along with the fish I keep out there in the summer.

Woolly worms were think on the roads like always, and this is the first year our backyard had a resident toad.

We also had two thriving colonies of sweat bees - one in the front yard and one in the back. Husband discovered that he has a localized severe reaction to sweat bee stings.
edit on 27-11-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:26 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Not here in Ohio.

Been here all 46 years of my life, and if anything we now have more bugs since the stink bugs arrived.

I actually got my first tick on me this year. I got another one on me later in the year. Mosquitos are as bad as ever, and despite the warnings about bees, I've had to evict 3 hives from my garage walls in the past 8 years.

Gnats are as annoying as ever. And Flies are all over.

I go hiking alot. The bugs in the forests around here are so bad, i have actually contemplated a beekeeper face shield.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:28 PM
link   
a reply to: ketsuko

You mentioned a few more that I miss as well. The praying mantis and grasshoppers.
Granted, not out in the fields much, but used to see them occasionally in the yard in tall grass.

Finding the real reason as to why they are scarce somewhere when once plentiful, and why they are overly plentiful in other areas may be a difficult task. The food chains can be complex, like a missing link causing a 'chain' reaction on other species.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: poncho1982
a reply to: charlyv

Not here in Ohio.

Been here all 46 years of my life, and if anything we now have more bugs since the stink bugs arrived.

I actually got my first tick on me this year. I got another one on me later in the year. Mosquitos are as bad as ever, and despite the warnings about bees, I've had to evict 3 hives from my garage walls in the past 8 years.

Gnats are as annoying as ever. And Flies are all over.

I go hiking alot. The bugs in the forests around here are so bad, i have actually contemplated a beekeeper face shield.


Something has to be unique there. Did you have a lot of recent rainfall last year? Are there stricter pesticides laws in effect? Are you in an area that would have low RF transmissions, unlike larger towns and cities? Those would be the easier ones to investigate.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:55 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Same here in Wisconsin. We did have record spring rains. There were more mosquitos, bees and butterflies than I've ever seen. The wasps are the worst, they are everywhere in huge numbers. I wonder if they are moving further north rather than south? The farms use tons of pesticides here, drop roundup like crazy so you'd think we'd see less here but nope, I've seen more bugs here than when I lived in Florida.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: poncho1982
a reply to: charlyv

Not here in Ohio.

Been here all 46 years of my life, and if anything we now have more bugs since the stink bugs arrived.

I actually got my first tick on me this year. I got another one on me later in the year. Mosquitos are as bad as ever, and despite the warnings about bees, I've had to evict 3 hives from my garage walls in the past 8 years.

Gnats are as annoying as ever. And Flies are all over.

I go hiking alot. The bugs in the forests around here are so bad, i have actually contemplated a beekeeper face shield.


Something has to be unique there. Did you have a lot of recent rainfall last year? Are there stricter pesticides laws in effect? Are you in an area that would have low RF transmissions, unlike larger towns and cities? Those would be the easier ones to investigate.


Ohio is a very humid state.

But nothing unusual. We go through cycles of weather, but the only difference in bugs is directly after a harsh winter. But they are back in full force by summer, we just get a bug-lite spring.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 06:58 PM
link   
a reply to: JAGStorm

Wisconsin and Ohio are a lot alike weather-wise.

You do have a lot of lakes there though.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:42 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Great post. At least here in my area of central NY I've only seen one butterfly this year, no honey bees, though plenty of the stinking hornets, not too many wasps thankfully. Haven't heard or seen a cricket in a long time, not nearly as many fireflies as I used to see. Just strange.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 07:50 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

I can certainly appreciate the concern, and that does seem drastic, but I have to say, it seems to be localized to your area. Where we are, haven't seen any changes such as you describe. Cicadas, flies, bees, wasps, spiders, butterflies, lightening bugs, etc - all as usual.

What else has changed in your area? New businesses, industry, etc? I'd guess something changed to cause what you are observing. Definitely a concern, too.

Edit to add - The Hubby is studying plants, agriculture, and also, related, insects. he stated flat out this has to be chemical. Suggests for possibilities, glythosates, or possible neonicotiniods. These are both insecticides. Another possibility he mentions is illegal use of DDT. A large petroleum spill is possible, or coal dust. Meaning, something sealed up, then breached, could have allowed the dust into the swamp, which could wipe out the insects. He suggests an entomology department at a local university or a bug guy at a zoo, to report this.
edit on 27-11-2017 by LadyGreenEyes because: added data



new topics

top topics



 
57
<< 1  2  3    5  6  7 >>

log in

join