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Do Meteors Normally Act Like This.

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posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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This occurred a few days ago in Wiltshire.

Not seen a meteor act like this previously. The meteor seems to come into vision and then reverse.

It's probably a normal occurrence, or maybe just the way the camera picked it up. Your comments would be appreciated, to educate this uneducated one.

news.sky.com...




posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Lens flare.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Forced perspective.
It in actuality came in at angle which is head away and downward from the camera.


Great clip. S&F


Edit:
I was watching the actual meteor. πŸ™„
Moohide.

If this is what the op was referring to.😊
edit on 26-11-2017 by Bigburgh because: Eggnogs a Boomsticks 😁



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:23 PM
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That was obviously a meteor that broke into pieces on entry.

Not seeing anything β€œacting” otherwise.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Where do you see a meteor do anything other than fall towards the Earth there?
I see lens flare doing exactly what you would expect it to do so Im still looking for the part where the meteor goes in reverse.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: alldaylong

Except for the lens flare, I don't see anything unusual; meteor kept going in straight line.
It became very luminous at one point ( no doubt when it started hitting the denser layers of the atmosphere) and then rapidly cooled and dimmed, but did not appear to break up. Suggestive of a metallic meteor.
edit on 26-11-2017 by M5xaz because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:25 PM
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yeah, that seems pretty normal. The spike in intensity makes it seems like it's getting closer when really it's getting brighter. Keep in mind, also, that this looks to me like a low-light setting on the camera. I don't think the object changes trajectory.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: Moohide

Correct.

I actually was outside at the time and saw this fireball. Seen many in my time, but this one was probably in my top3. Booms were also reported during this event, so it may have dropped some rocks on the ground.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:31 PM
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Thank you all for your comments.

I assumed it was quite normal and had more to do with the camera rather than the meteor.





posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:43 PM
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It seems that probably depends on what angle this meteor entered the Earth but mostly you would expect a tail of debris?



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:44 PM
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It kind of broke up and the explosion shot a piece to the side a bit. That happens when the fireballs break up quite often. Nothing seems to be abnormal.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: alldaylong

Thank you all for your comments.

I assumed it was quite normal and had more to do with the camera rather than the meteor.




The trouble with lenses is that the brighter the light shining at it, the more chance there is to get artifacts like "flaring" and "ghosting". Fireballs can be extremely bright, so artifacts like the ones seen here are very common with brighter events. This one has been estimated at about -12 mag (about the brightness of a full Moon), and was likely the brightest fireball caught over the UK in 3 years from what I hear.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
It seems that probably depends on what angle this meteor entered the Earth but mostly you would expect a tail of debris?


There were quite a few reports of fragmentation (although I didn't see it from here because it went behind trees). Unfortunately cameras like this don't tend to pick up the fine details like that because they are designed to be very sensitive, and the brightness of an event like this tends to overwhelm the sensor, so it just looks like a big "blob" of light.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:57 PM
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The glow getting larger and larger around it causes the illusion it's coming straight down, but it's always moving the same direction and angle.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: FireballStorm

There are many reports of fireballs the last couple of weeks I wonder what causes the increase? As I also watched a video that the same glowing light that what happened in Utah now seemed to have happened somewhere over Newyork?


edit on 0b45America/ChicagoSun, 26 Nov 2017 14:11:45 -0600vAmerica/ChicagoSun, 26 Nov 2017 14:11:45 -06001 by 0bserver1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: FireballStorm

There are many reports of fireballs the last couple of weeks I wonder what causes the increase? As I also watched a video that the same glowing light that what happened in Utah now seemed to have happened somewhere over Newyork?



Probably multiple factors at play here. Firstly, it's quite a busy time of year for meteor showers. The Taurids and Leonids have peaked and are now winding down, while the Geminids are just starting to get going.

Secondly, I would guess that this part of space we are passing through right now just happens to have more than it's fair share of random space rocks. Natural distributions tend to be like that. Sometime you get "clumpy" periods, and other times they become less numerous.



originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: FireballStorm
As I also watched a video that the same glowing light that what happened in Utah now seemed to have happened somewhere over Newyork?


I'm not familiar with the events you mention above, but it's not unheard of to get get multiple events in one night over a landmass as large as the USA. In fact, NASA fireball cameras usually pick up at least a handful of fireballs on an average night, and it's rare for them not to pick up any in a night. Also, a single big event can be visible for hundreds of miles in every direction, especially if they come in at a low angle.



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: FireballStorm




Sometime you get "clumpy" periods, and other times they become less numerous.



Well, I'll hold my fingers crossed because if one falls close to my hometown I'll definitely go search for debris . Those fragments are worth some big money I've heard?



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: 0bserver1
a reply to: FireballStorm




Sometime you get "clumpy" periods, and other times they become less numerous.



Well, I'll hold my fingers crossed because if one falls close to my hometown I'll definitely go search for debris . Those fragments are worth some big money I've heard?


They can be. It depends on a few factors including the type of rock, so the rarer ones tend to be valuable, and those that are historic/widely seen/or "hammer stones" (if they hit a person or object), as long as there is a fairly limited amount of material to go around. If they drop large amounts of material then the price can be surprisingly low due to supply/demand. Check ebay to get a rough idea, but beware of scammers if you consider buying. Buying from a reputable meteorite specialist is a good idea. I bought a small piece of Sikhote Alin a few years back for a few dollars, just for fun.


BTW - here is a link that makes interesting reading. It's just the larger events that have been picked up by US DOD sensors over the years since they started publishing select data (some needs to be kept secret, since if they published it all, enemies of the US would be able to gauge how sensitive the DOD sensors are, and possibly get away with conducting illegal nuclear testing). Events of the same sort of energy range we are discussing in this thread are probably just a little too small to make it on to the table in the link, but it gives a good idea of just how frequent and random the larger events tend to be. Chelyabinsk (the largest event) is also visible on the diagram.

cneos.jpl.nasa.gov...



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 04:51 AM
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The rapid increase in brightness can fool the observer into thinking that the meteor is actually moving towards them, when in fact it is simply fragmenting and exploding as it hits denser layers of the atmosphere.



posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: Mogget
The rapid increase in brightness can fool the observer into thinking that the meteor is actually moving towards them, when in fact it is simply fragmenting and exploding as it hits denser layers of the atmosphere.


Absolutely. The converse is also true. A rapidly dimming object might appear to be "shooting off into the distance at incredible" speed, whilst at the same time actually traveling towards the observer. It really is fascinating/astounding how easily the eyes/brain is fooled!

It's also ironic, how a witness to such an event, when the object appears to fall down behind the horizon, often thinks that the meteor fell "just behind the hill" or "landed in the field behind the house" (as someone reported with this one), when in fact, for the meteorites to land anywhere near you, the last sighting of the event would actually have to be high in the sky, and almost overhead - ie. the complete opposite to what most people are expecting. A meteor (or fireball) seen close to the horizon is almost certainly much further away than one seen high in the sky.



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