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More than half of Americans have less than $1000 in savings

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posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: ttobban

Only 41% of working age Americans (and there's virtually no overlap with those who don't have savings) have retirement accounts.

I think you don't understand what these articles are saying. Over 50% of Americans don't have the access to funds to cover paying for a medium sized car repair.




posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:19 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
I only need to increase while I own it. What happens after is irrelevant to my investment.


That's a rather narrow view. Because everyone has the same viewpoint, the next buyer also needs it to increase in value.

The viewpoint that property values need to increase is completely unsustainable.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:29 AM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
That's a rather narrow view. Because everyone has the same viewpoint, the next buyer also needs it to increase in value.


Since when is investing an altruistic endeavor?



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: projectvxn




I also buy silver and have some gold. Now I'm not a Peter Schiff/Ron Paul 'everything must be gold or back by gold' idea. But if you want to protect your buying power over the long haul, hanging on to metals is a damned good idea.


Well, let's be completely honest. In a SHTF scenario, the most valuable metal you can have is lead. lol

Sorry gang, just had to throw a little levity in here

edit on 30-11-2017 by Eshel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
Since when is investing an altruistic endeavor?


Since we promoted investing as a solution to retirement for the general population.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: Aazadan
Since we promoted investing as a solution to retirement for the general population.


I'm not concerned about the general population's real estate or investments.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Oh, I understand the moral of the story. My points feed the concepts that the lack of savings is a result of poor financial educations... way more than it may be as a result of outer influences. It has way more to do with not ceasing opportunity than it has to do with opportunity to be lacking and or existing.

Do people really think a squirrel that eats every nut they see and fails to bury one or two nuts for winter time will live as long or as comfortable as squirrels that bury a larger portion of what they collect? I'm pretty sure squirrels wouldn't bury nuts at all if there wasn't survival standards at play. Squirrels don't even know that they're planting the trees that feed their families in decades forward. Spending all the money that comes through our possession is almost a sure fire way to ensure your great grand kids suffer for overindulging in times of past.

The U.S. has problems like any and all nations, but it's still the easiest country in the world to establish wealth. As I read these stories of how hard it is to save in the U.S., all I can think of is how thankful I am to have it as easy as Americans have it. Even minimum wage daily salaries are equivalent to or greater to the monthly salaries offered in third world countries.

Sadly, the definition of savings has been redefined to fit this current generation... to compare savings to the levels of which we consume compared to others, rather then just saving to what fits our income level. Can't save because the income level isn't high enough to fit life choices of cost, and it means that more time needs to be spent creating a revenue stream to be able to save. Saving is an attitude... not an offer.

is it really that hard while at Walmart, to bar code scan the clearance rack items, compare prices to Amazon & Ebay, clear the rack of items that have a profit to be made, and bank the difference when it gets resold? People are already there... most likely picking up one of those useless items to store under the couch. Well, knickknacks buried under the couch don't earn interest, and it's a poor avenue to expect savings to develop. A saver that wants a useless knickknack will buy two, and let another person buy the item for them since it's half off anyway.

Arbitrage... one of the best ingredients to capitalism that could exist!



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 06:43 PM
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originally posted by: ttobban
is it really that hard while at Walmart, to bar code scan the clearance rack items, compare prices to Amazon & Ebay, clear the rack of items that have a profit to be made, and bank the difference when it gets resold? People are already there... most likely picking up one of those useless items to store under the couch. Well, knickknacks buried under the couch don't earn interest, and it's a poor avenue to expect savings to develop. A saver that wants a useless knickknack will buy two, and let another person buy the item for them since it's half off anyway.

Arbitrage... one of the best ingredients to capitalism that could exist!


Any decent manager will fire an employee for this. Not only are you wasting time browsing Ebay and Amazon while on the clock, but you're denying your store stock that they could be using to lure customers in the door.

I've seen many businesses shut down because the employees decided to run these types of side hustles.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:29 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Again... I am failing to get my points across clearly. Sorry, I analyze so many things that it's hard to channel thought into clarity.

I meant shoppers of Walmart. The shoppers that are there because they want to SAVE a few bucks on things they want... not things they need. Shop at Walmart as a consumer, and your adding to the savings funds of the Walton family... not your own family.

I hate Walmart with a passion and will only go in one to profit off of what their clearance items offer in value. I will pay double to not allow the Walton's to make a savings off of the finances I control at the time.

I hate Walmart because they're TOO savvy in gaining savings. Walmart is the world's largest retailer, yet is allowed to keep the largest level of federally subsidized employees. How? Because the bulk of subsidies offered back to the under valued employees of Walmart are spent directly back at the Walmart registers. The Walton's are so conniving in their savings that they skimp on offering their employees their worth and allow for tax payers to pick up the slack of people like me that boycott them.

Look at the millions of people shopping at Walmart that wouldn't offer a thought to profiting from the clearance racks as they shipped... it's a direct indicator of the financial diet of which is preferred to be consumed.

We can either save now to spend later or spend to save as much as we can... it's a completely free will of operation program... this isn't a slave race... people are slaves to their own way of thinking though.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:33 PM
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a reply to: nOraKat

I didn't know people still used "Savings Accounts". If I save, I save in stocks, 401K, or a little safety cushion in the checking... Why bother with a "Savings Account"? I think that is why the number is so high - people have money but not in savings



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: ttobban

There's perfect examples within this thread even of what I am talking about. Without a need to name names, there's a post in this thread that indicates that they are on the 'lack of savings' reality. No biggie... it is a common thing. But I remember the same member, in the summertime, requesting opinions of which temporary pool to put in the backyard... a blow up one, or a supported one with a sand base. It was clearly stated that the consumption item would meet expectations if the pool made it one swimming season (4 months).

Now, I still remember this instance clearly and almost bet that the member completely forgot about even talking about it, let alone the thought being attached to the wasted money. With no savings/investments, I am swimming laps in my bath tub... sorry.

Wasting money and shunning the benefits of sacrificing to save... there is no difference between the two.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: ttobban

Ok, you meant the customer. There's still some factors you haven't accounted for though, good arbitrage opportunities are rare. A guy I know used to do this with console releases for a few years. He had a high limit credit card, and would buy a stores entire stock of a new game system on release day, and then resell them on ebay at higher values. On just the PS4, if his stories are to be believed, on the 100 systems he was able to buy from local and regional Gamestops, he made $1400/system (selling at $2000 each), for $140,000 in profit. That's a high yield item though.

When we're talking about the typical item on a Walmart shelf vs Ebay you're generally talking about selling a $10 item for $11. In order to do this, you not only have to spend a large amount of time researching items, but you need access to large amounts of funds up front, and then you have to manage the listings of large numbers of items. The time cost here is the most significant, because your time has value. The median household income is $54,000, that means that on average your time needs to be valued at $27/hour. If you're reselling at a 20% markup, that means you need to be processing $135/hour in merchandise. Using the earlier example of the $10 item, that means buying, packing, and shipping one item every 4.5 minutes roughly. It's not the most strenuous pace, but it's still work... and it doesn't get you anywhere in life skills wise, it's just mindless labor.

I don't see the argument where that's advantageous to any other job where you can choose what you want to do, get practice at it, and actually progress in skill and experience over time while doing it... and at lower risk.

Take my job for example, I got above median wage as an intern (as the first real job in my life), I literally get to choose when and how much I work per week, they send me on trips all over the world whenever I want to go on one, and I get to work in a field that's very interesting to me. Why would anyone choose something high risk over what's enjoyable and actually helps them progress in life?



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:23 PM
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are you a FBA'er? I started last Christmas..but Amazon has restricted so many categories
We are looking into different stores Etsy for vintage goods..Ebay for overstock..Amazon for anything not restricted and a Shopify for our merchandise. I follow so many FBA/Arbitrage boards..they are so helpful and really get a person motivated. Ive seen people going from a $400 investment to making 10K a day. Im not there yet..but 2018 is when we are going big. I want those payouts!lol I think we have used 2017 for learning...making mistakes..and recreating our brand. Would love to chat FBA anytime


a reply to: ttobban



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:38 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

I am not trying to sell anybody a winning strategy. I am just calling out the fact that savings relates to anything in life... fail to enter it into being a reality and it ceases to exist... it's quite simple.

All that math you did is fear inducing one self into reality, that investing/saving is not advantageous... I don't get why. It does not take hiking gear to get to the other side of a mole hill.

It's very easy to create a seller's account on the internet. They come with barcode scanners built in. When the clearance rack gets passed the phone takes a picture of the bar code, and indicates what it sells for on whatever other site... it does come with some effort now... one needs to stop walking, push a few buttons on the phone, and read what they sell for. One will then have to subtract the difference s in price, but the phone can help with that for free too. If it costs 9 and they list for $11, put it back... If it's 4 bucks and sells for 10, put them all in your cart.

Spend $75 of those savings on an LLC, make it a business, and lessen your tax burdens for life... it's an extra 10% or so to save with. These things are quite simple, but are made to be like it's making the financial Olympic team... I just don't understand that way of thinking.

I set my terms of saving, therefore it buys me time to do whatever the hell I want. It's a poor savings strategy to not invest in yourself... taking a job is trading time for money, nothing more/nothing less.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:45 PM
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It doesn't matter what you pay in taxes


I have been telling people this for years, but Americans are so brainwashed and incapable of thinking it's pointless. We have had taxes for 100 years, that isn't what caused quality of life to nosedive for average Americans in the last 30 years.

The problem is corporations and other wealthy people. They are destroying us and it's easy because people are so stupid they care about things like flags and sports with absolutely zero importance.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 08:49 PM
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There's a better way to go. Buy objects that have some utility in your life now, but don't lose much in resale. Focus your hobbies around that. Used books is a good one, CCG's are another. If you don't want to do that, put it in stocks.

Outside of necessities, one should never purchase an asset that naturally depreciates. That's the key, and it's easy to do. The issue here though is that most people don't have the money to do that. Nearly 50% of people cannot afford a $400 expense.

On this subject, I just saw this company today.
www.racked.com...

It's essentially a new form of credit. I'm still not sure if I think it will help or hurt people, but it adds liquidity to the market, and could very well end auto title loan and payday loan vendors.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: Neopan100

I am an opportunist, and continuously add revenue streams. Revenue streams get split into 3 business accounts... taxes, overhead, and profits. While people tweet, I click buy/sell buttons. You won't find a post of mine here at ATS during trading hours... I promise that. It's just in my DNA to know that Walmart buys the most of things, so they get it the cheapest as well. Nobody can match Wally World clearance prices... it's just a matter of how much difference.

As a child at this time of year, anytime spent walking places after dinner hours, I was knocking on almost every door singing 'Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer.' I would lure friends into joining me, and we would split $20-30 on the way home from playing basketball. If I got dragged to the grocery store as a kid, I waited outside and carried bags to trunks of cars for tips. I was selling candy for profits in school, because it was made to be like a black market. I asked for a dollar when I was 6 for baseball cards, I was met with a sorrowed look of disappointment that it was not available... I vowed to never ask anyone for money at that point in time and ensured I always saved a portion of what I earned.

I thoroughly enjoy this subject, and would love to learn more and maybe spark ideas about FBA. The newest adventure I am into lately is donating time to help people form healthy business relationships... to hinder control of corporate America standards. If FBA was a full on focus for you for the last year of so, I'd look into a few of the FBA software analysis tools that let you compare online retailer sales volumes/prices to specific products. I'd also stay within the $10-$50 retail range, because above $50 and the non savers tend to balk or need permission to impulse shop. It's really tough to compete with software, but there's a few niche market items that can gain solid revenue streams. I'd be entering into affiliate marketing simultaneously if I were devoting so much time to FBA. I'd love to learn more about your strategies as well... PM away!

I was never normal, I am not normal now, and I never plan to be normal. But, because I saved/invested EARLY I am not a slave to mycellf.



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 03:29 AM
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a reply to: Infinitis

Same for me, I have money saved in a 401k, I keep my bills low I have really excellent credit with some pretty high limits that I can tap into for emergencies. I have used my credit cards to cover emergencies such as expensive auto repairs and I pay it back down as fast as possible even if I have to deny myself some of the luxuries that I appreciate in life.



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: nOraKat

In the next two decades i doubt money as we know it will be a thing. Electronic Currency will take over our every day lives, and when that happens, it's End Game for everyone.



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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Not everyone has great health or even insurance. I can show receipts of $840 for one vial of insulin for the month.
One health problem or vehicle break down away from your world flipping upside down. A wage of 10-30 in not a decent wage folks. In the 80's you could own a home and 2 vehicles and support a family of 4 on $10 an hour. So employers offering $10 an hour today's wages that many years difference is laughable. Most jobs are minimum and no benefits or 401k. In fact you work less hours as the employers gets that $800 per person kickback money for hiring people whom are on welfare/snap etc from the federal government. The feds are literally paying more to the employer than what the employer is paying the employee. The employer only gives enough hours to stay in this bracket. So the employee works 20 hours a week part-time no benefits. It's the new scam and the federal government promotes it. The federal government would be better off to pay the employee the $800 for not working.



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