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Lightning Bolts are churning out Antimatter all over Earth

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posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 05:46 PM
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A physicist in Japan has proven in a published paper that thunderheads are basically giant particle accelerators.


Particles split in the hot belly of a lightning bolt. Radioactive particles decay in the afterglow. Gamma rays rain down to Earth. Teruaki Enoto, a physicist at Kyoto University in Japan, proved for the first time, in a paper published Nov. 23, that lightning bolts work as natural particle accelerators. Enoto and his co-authors' results confirm for the first time speculation dating back to 1925 about this phenomenon. Back then, scientists suggested that energized, radioactive particles might zip through the booms and flashes of a thunderstorm. Those particles emit energy at precise wavelengths, which Enoto and colleagues are the first to detect.



When lighting strikes, electrons shoot screamingly fast between clouds and Earth's surface (or between two clouds). But the particles don't travel through empty space. Along the way, they crash again and again into atmospheric gas molecules. All those collisions heat the gas into a state called plasma, which glows with blackbody radiation (a type of electromagnetic radiation given off by some opaque objects).

Some of that glow, people can see, in the characteristic bright flash of lightning. But some of the emission takes place at frequencies, including X-rays and gamma-rays, far above what the human eye can detect. Enoto's results show that those beams of invisible energy — especially the gamma-rays — excite ambient nitrogen and oxygen in the atmosphere, knocking out neutrons from the molecules the gamma rays encounter. In other words, the process results in nuclear fission.

Now, things get really exciting. Nitrogen nuclei with 14 neutrons are stable. But take one of those neutrons away, and you're left with nitrogen-13, an unstable, radioactive isotope. Similarly, oxygen-16 is stable, but -15 … not so much. Soon, all of those N-13 and O-15 molecules decay. Each unstable isotope fires off an additional neutrino and positron (the antimatter partner of the electron); both are elementary particles with exotic properties. The neutrinos stream away, nearly undetectable. But the positrons, or anti-electrons, go on to collide with their twins: ambient electrons in the atmosphere. And when matter and antimatter meet, they annihilate in a signature flash of energy. In this case, the signature is a gamma ray with an energy of 0.511 megaelectron volts.




Very interesting and even i understood how this works. Does this discovery make particle weapons a reality now? I admit i can't contribute much knowledge on the topic but like reading other's opinions.

www.livescience.com...




posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 06:04 PM
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It has always been doing that even though science did not recognize it is happening. How many times did scientists deny anything other than they thought was happening.

I just think it looks cool, don't really care what is happening. I am sure they want to know so they can sell weapon technology based off of it.



posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: EchoesInTime

Uh oh. Looks like LHC might have to compete with mother nature for funding.



posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 09:57 PM
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this is my chance to throw out a request for anyone else notice when lightning hits...the rain reacts in intensity...seemingly instantly

I see it always....always have....readin that paragraph made me ask
edit on 24-11-2017 by GBP/JPY because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 11:31 PM
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a reply to: EchoesInTime
Well that's cool. But they should stop calling it antimatter, its all matter after all. Not that any of it matters.


Very interesting and even i understood how this works. Does this discovery make particle weapons a reality now? I admit i can't contribute much knowledge on the topic but like reading other's opinions.

Who needs a particle weapon which is essentially a lightning gun, when you have a railgun capable of going over a 100 miles and through foot thick steel like a hot knife through butter. But ya, you could be right maybe its time for a particle gun as well.



posted on Nov, 24 2017 @ 11:53 PM
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originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: EchoesInTime
Well that's cool. But they should stop calling it antimatter, its all matter after all. Not that any of it matters.


Very interesting and even i understood how this works. Does this discovery make particle weapons a reality now? I admit i can't contribute much knowledge on the topic but like reading other's opinions.

Who needs a particle weapon which is essentially a lightning gun, when you have a railgun capable of going over a 100 miles and through foot thick steel like a hot knife through butter. But ya, you could be right maybe its time for a particle gun as well.


Matter of fact, it doesn't really matter what we call it. Sprite goop sounds like a better name.



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 02:10 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
It has always been doing that even though science did not recognize it is happening. How many times did scientists deny anything other than they thought was happening.

I just think it looks cool, don't really care what is happening. I am sure they want to know so they can sell weapon technology based off of it.

LMAO what?

Where and when did scientists deny it?



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 02:25 AM
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a reply to: moebius

You search the Military/Weapons/Aviation forum here and it would seem they already have in 2004.



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 03:27 AM
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originally posted by: BELIEVERpriest
a reply to: EchoesInTime

Uh oh. Looks like LHC might have to compete with mother nature for funding.


But the black hole machine is going to cause a black hole and rip us all apart. They said so. I made so many people hold me.


I'm glad it's not a black hole machine anymore. whew. I like the lightening machine much better.



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 03:31 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: EchoesInTime
Well that's cool. But they should stop calling it antimatter, its all matter after all. Not that any of it matters.


Very interesting and even i understood how this works. Does this discovery make particle weapons a reality now? I admit i can't contribute much knowledge on the topic but like reading other's opinions.

Who needs a particle weapon which is essentially a lightning gun, when you have a railgun capable of going over a 100 miles and through foot thick steel like a hot knife through butter. But ya, you could be right maybe its time for a particle gun as well.


Matter of fact, it doesn't really matter what we call it. Sprite goop sounds like a better name.


Sprites are notoriously difficult to give sprite collision detection to,l on the Z80 processor. You have to set an interrupt in the main loop and scan the edges every screen raster scan to see if another sprite has crossed paths. Only then can you jump to the subroutine that causes the actual collision... the 6502 processor was much better at it, dedicate even, but don't start me on sprites in the border. That's pure magick.



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 03:52 AM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
this is my chance to throw out a request for anyone else notice when lightning hits...the rain reacts in intensity...seemingly instantly

I see it always....always have....readin that paragraph made me ask


Yes, I've seen that. There is the flash, the rumble and then the rain starts falling really heavy. The shockwave from the lightning bolt compresses the water droplets together and they combine to form droplets that exceed the holding capacity of the air.

I've been in a house right when a lightning bolt struck about 10 meters away on the ground. It wasn't a a rumble, but an extremely sharp "crack", like a spark but 20 octaves lower. For some reason, I instantly felt "hot" in my chest and all over. Brilliant white and time seemed to slow down to nothing.

edit on 25-11-2017 by stormcell because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: badw0lf

originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: galadofwarthethird
a reply to: EchoesInTime
Well that's cool. But they should stop calling it antimatter, its all matter after all. Not that any of it matters.


Very interesting and even i understood how this works. Does this discovery make particle weapons a reality now? I admit i can't contribute much knowledge on the topic but like reading other's opinions.

Who needs a particle weapon which is essentially a lightning gun, when you have a railgun capable of going over a 100 miles and through foot thick steel like a hot knife through butter. But ya, you could be right maybe its time for a particle gun as well.


Matter of fact, it doesn't really matter what we call it. Sprite goop sounds like a better name.


Sprites are notoriously difficult to give sprite collision detection to,l on the Z80 processor. You have to set an interrupt in the main loop and scan the edges every screen raster scan to see if another sprite has crossed paths. Only then can you jump to the subroutine that causes the actual collision... the 6502 processor was much better at it, dedicate even, but don't start me on sprites in the border. That's pure magick.



Ya I really find:


bool detectCollision(Sprite obj)[
foreach(Sprite sprite; level.sprites)[
if(sprite.x == obj.x && sprite.y == obj.y)[
return true;
]
return false;
]
]

Has revolutionized the business of sprite collision detection since the days of the Z80.

Won't let me do curly braces


Pretend the square braces are curly....shhhhh
ATS needs code tags for their forum.
edit on 25/11/2017 by dug88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 26 2017 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: stormcell
Wow that's pretty cool and makes sense, seeing as lighting can get to be a hotter then the surface of the sun, and in that one split second its just one long ark straight up into the sky, anything in the way like rain, air, dust, whatever else. Well? there probably not gonna like it, kind of like displacing anything in the way along its ark, in that split second.

Oh! And by the way 10 meters is a pretty good spot to be from any lightning strike, that way you get all the charm and flashy dazzle hair standing on end, without all the crispy critters WTF sensation which comes with being somewhere in the 0 meters, to 1 or 2 meters range from it.




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