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366th Equipment Maintenance Squadron transports damaged F-35

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posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 04:07 PM
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The 366th Equipment Maintenance Squadron completed the move of a damaged F-35A from Mountain Home, in Idaho to the Depot at Hill, in Utah. The aircraft has been grounded for the last year, after suffering a fire during engine start caused by high winds.

Planning for the move began in April when crews were sent out to check various routes to ensure they could take the weight and the clearances were high enough. It ended with the aircraft being partially disassembled and lifted onto a specialized trailer for the transport, and the aircraft being moved for repairs.

www.aerotechnews.com...
edit on 11/22/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

You would almost think sending a repair crew to the plane would of been the better choice . Trucks end up in the ditch sometimes .



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

They would have had to transport a lot of specialized equipment as well. They're going to have to pull the fuselage apart and basically rebuild the aft fuselage.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 04:32 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Kind of curious as to how big the repair bill would be on that . Any estimates ?



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

I'd say $4-6M initial estimate, but could go as high as $12-15M depending on what they find once they get into the fuselage and see what they're working with.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 05:43 PM
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There is a C130 parked at Hill AFB in the Google imagery, still had runway access at the time but it may not be there anymore. Runway 12 looks kind of IFFY at Mountain home.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

God's speed on getting parts for the bird.



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 07:14 PM
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Gunfighters unite......it's best to be away from the stark freezing and North West winds.....

my home......back in the war.....72.....FB111-F's

oh editt...December 72 twas -33....the tires were stuck to the pavement and the batteries woudn't work....my buddy's had a saying...the wind don't blow in Idaho....it sucks


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posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 07:31 PM
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I’m curious how high winds caused the fire. I would imagine if the engine is off and wind wound it up that’s all it would do. Does the 35 automatically feed fuel if it detects RPM? Maybe I misread just seems odd to me, hopefully it’s a fix can be thrown in with the next software update.

Thank you for sharing Zaph
edit on 11/22/2017 by 772STi because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 08:05 PM
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a reply to: 772STi

They did a hot start after finishing a sortie, and the aircraft had been parked so the wind was blowing up the exhaust. It ended up with higher fuel flow than it should have had, and lower RPM, and the extra fuel ignited, and got up to the top of the fuselage where it ignited the RAM.

www.airforcemag.com...

The AIB report can be found at the link.
edit on 11/22/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)

edit on 11/22/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


That was a very good read and filled in the gaps of how I thought it happened. It’s seems they now have a procedure to stop this from happening again, obviously good news and sometimes you learn the hard way.

Thanks for taking the time to put that link up. Will probably be offline until Friday so Happy Thanksgiving to everyone



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 04:15 AM
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I didn't read the report but in my experience, when you get a tailpipe fire you cut fuel, shift the starter knob in the cockpit to "crank" and continue to (dry) max motor on the starter till the fuel burns/blows out. Pretty sure you would be familiar with that procedure Zaph.



posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: thebozeian

The problem was when the flames were blown over the back of the aircraft the RAM ignited. That stuff is nasty as hell to deal with.



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