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Conceal Carry and Caution

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posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey


Sadly, though, I work on federal property, and carrying even in my truck (although I've done it from time to time) could get me fired.

Safer there, I imagine. Armed guards there, right? Even if, "Federal Property" isn't the kind of place mass murderers that want to maximize body counts are drawn to. Like the places they do go, churches, schools, movie theaters and bars, for instance. Firearms are not allowed, period.

Considering the vulnerability of say sandy hook elementary (all children) or the aurora movie theatre (all dark), confusion factor is increased.

In the case of Aurora Movie theatre, friggin creep used teargas grenades too...

Imagine being armed in that closed in environment, choking and teared up, trying to seek cover and figure out your target in the dark with people screaming and jumping around.




posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

Yeah someone posted that earlier. Any requirements for signage is then a waste of time, being meaningless.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: loveguy
a reply to: redhorse

I guess hubby thinks possessing the weapon is security enough and can just sleep peacefully with it under his belt.
The responsibility necessary to carry a gun does not diminish, but increases exponentially.

If he's a drinker he is putting you at risk, put him in rehab. His brain is turning to mush.
Sorry about the drinking angle, it appears to me that he has a case of liquid courage (something) going on...

This is personal and I don't wish to have you divulge on the board whether right or wrong assessment, but encourage you where to turn to.


He's not a drinker, but even he'll admit that he was impaired. He take ADHD medication and had forgotten for two days so he was quite scattered (also, something I did not know until after the theater situation).



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:03 AM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz5
a reply to: redhorse

"This profound lack of situational awareness is more common for him when he is carrying"

sounds like the gun has a 'safety blanket' effect for your hubby when carrying, insomuch as the mere fact he has it lessens his subconscious concern for his safety. 'the gun is looking out for me, i don't need to'


Yes. He has admitted that. It is something that needs to be addressed. He says that he carries the gun so that he doesn't have to be so worried and he can relax. I get that to a point I guess, but he still needs to pay attention to what is going on around him.
edit on 21-11-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

That's good in that the way the two of you have an open line of communication.
I would guess you now have to hound him on his meds.

I would like to call it a small hurdle while no harm done, but keep it chalked as a lesson learned.



ETA; the impression I got about the hooded fellow was that he's from out of the area and bored. He probably would have sat out of sight had he ill intentions?
edit on (11/21/1717 by loveguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:19 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: SlapMonkey

Safer there, I imagine. Armed guards there, right?

Part-time armed guards, more for after-duty hours than before. But we do need electronic key cards to get into the building, so there's that, I suppose.



Imagine being armed in that closed in environment, choking and teared up, trying to seek cover and figure out your target in the dark with people screaming and jumping around.

Yep, it would be terrible, but it's certainly not the norm (using tear gas) when things like that happen.

I've don't the whole CS "gas chamber" when I was in the military, and we had to stand in there for what seemed like at least 5 minutes without our gas masks on, all saying our name and rank and social security number before we could exit...in a line of about 30 people, and if they messed up, they started over at the beginning.

Tear gas sucks balls.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: redhorse
Anyone with a hood up indoors immediately gives out negative vibes as if they are trying to hide, and if you hoodies can't see that then you will someday get the wrong end of someone, so don't cry that you are innocent.


Wow! So you have a “right” to carry a gun (as I do and practice it) but others don’t have right to wear what they want under threat of death?

I would hope you might reconsider that position because 1) this is America and 2) a hood up hoodie does not imply hiding (as wearing a full face stocking mask does).

Perspectives like this give the anti-gunners yet more ammunition...



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

What is your husbands training?



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:45 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey


Yep, it would be terrible, but it's certainly not the norm (using tear gas) when things like that happen.

Neither are mass shooting sprees.

In Las Vegas, side arm wouldn't have helped.

At Virgina Tech, few students go to class armed.

At Pulse nightclub in Florida, body searches at the door. The perp shot his way in.

Others like Columbine, churches, hospitals, Malls, each have their own vulnerabilities. Thats why they are chosen.

God bless the average 'law abiding' citizen that circumvents (breaks) the law and carries concealed anyway. I'm not worried about him at all. He's my hero.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: redhorse

If you have to worry about getting shot by "jumpy" cops over a legally carried weapon, then the problem isn't carrying a weapon. The problem is the "jumpy" cops.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 11:51 AM
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'law abiding' citizen that circumvents (breaks) the law


Equals not law abiding citizen.


I know what you meant and I also suppose that implies minor law breaking issues.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: Lab4Us
Tell me just why you would want to wear a hood up indoors? Outside yes. Being as I live in the UK if you wear a hood up indoors in some buildings you WILL get attention you don't want because as I said the only reason to have a hood up is to hide your appearance.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: cavtrooper7
a reply to: redhorse

What is your husbands training?


Prior military. Army.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: Woodcarver

originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: Woodcarver
a reply to: redhorse

Why did the hoodie make you paranoid? You are obviously not comfortable in public if everyone in a hoodie makes you anxious. Body language is a much more clear indicator of people's intentions. Your husband's spidey sense was not triggered by the guys clothing or his body language, and the hooded fellow did not attack anyone. That tells me that his intuition is far better than yours. You should prob trust him a little more than this. It seems he is a reasonable rational person who didn't pull his gun out on a kid because of "clothes".

One question.... was the kid in the hoodie black?


He was not black.

My husband has already acknowledged that my "spider sense" as you call it is better than his. He was nervous and weird, and he didn't bother me that much. My take was 30 something, alone and didn't want people to know that he was watching Thor Ragnarok for the fifth time. What bothered me is that my husband was completely unaware that he was there at all. He didn't even make an assessment.

Oh and grey hoody dude was white. Just to repeat because that seems to be important to you.

If he were black, he would have fit the rampagy, angsty white guy shooting people for no reason profile less though. So, I guess I am a bigot after all.

Also (F*** you, you assumptive prick, trying to make things about race).

Also, just so folks know, "hood up" is very unusual here. It's considered rude. Most men don't wear a hat indoors, because it's rude and not socially acceptable in most situations. Although, there are exceptions, but a theater isn't one. It was weird.
I think your husband panders to your self inflated sense of worth. His intuition was dead on and yours was way off. Your whole story shows that you are not only uncomfortable in normal public situations, but that you don't trust your husband for extremely irrational reasons. I feel bad for him. You should do something nice for him, for me. Also, send my condolences to him.


Oh. MRA.

I feel sorry for you too.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: Lab4Us
Tell me just why you would want to wear a hood up indoors? Outside yes. Being as I live in the UK if you wear a hood up indoors in some buildings you WILL get attention you don't want because as I said the only reason to have a hood up is to hide your appearance.


I wear hoodies a lot, I wear them with the hood up a lot. Once in my life I wore one to conceal my identity (while filling a public fountain with coloured bubble bath, though a hoody wasn't enough, I needed a military mask to hide my face too and nobody cared, I was under 25 when this happened) but usually.i just like wearing hats and hoods. I live in the UK (Scotland) and nobody has ever said a word to me about my style choice nor have I been eyed suspiciously....

ETA I've worn hoods up in clubs, pubs, cinemas, universities, shops, cafes, libraries, hotels, gyms, schools (I'm a father of 3) on busses and trains. Most places really...
edit on 21/11/17 by djz3ro because: I wanted to add indoor places I've been "hooded"...



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: djz3ro

originally posted by: crayzeed
a reply to: Lab4Us
Tell me just why you would want to wear a hood up indoors? Outside yes. Being as I live in the UK if you wear a hood up indoors in some buildings you WILL get attention you don't want because as I said the only reason to have a hood up is to hide your appearance.


I wear hoodies a lot, I wear them with the hood up a lot. Once in my life I wore one to conceal my identity (while filling a public fountain with coloured bubble bath, though a hoody wasn't enough, I needed a military mask to hide my face too and nobody cared, I was under 25 when this happened) but usually.i just like wearing hats and hoods. I live in the UK (Scotland) and nobody has ever said a word to me about my style choice nor have I been eyed suspiciously....

ETA I've worn hoods up in clubs, pubs, cinemas, universities, shops, cafes, libraries, hotels, gyms, schools (I'm a father of 3) on busses and trains. Most places really...


Social context is important. For goodness sakes. I was in a hoodie that day, but I sure don't put that hood up indoors. I'm on the autistic spectrum. I have social anxiety. There are times that I want to, but I don't because...

It. Will. Freak. People. Out.

So it's inconsiderate. It's just not something you see around here. As I said, most men don't even wear a hat indoors. They will take it off. It's considered rude. But having a hoodie up in a building is not only rude, it's suspicious. I'm sure the guy was fine. I was 95% sure he was fine when he walked in, but the point is, it was weird and my husband did not even know that the guy existed.

*edited to add*

This was just one example. Him carrying that gun into a place and just being completely oblivious to the people around him is a common occurrence, this is just where I got fed up.

edit on 21-11-2017 by redhorse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: shawmanfromny
a reply to: redhorse

If your husband has a valid concealed permit and keeps his gun concealed, then there shouldn't be an issue with "nasty aggressive cops." A company policy prohibiting guns, doesn't mean it's legally vaild. Unless businesses are in jurisdictions that have passed laws to prohibit the carry of weapons in their establishments, it is not ILLEGAL. However, if a manager, or company employee ASKS your husband to leave their business, because of their "gun free policy", then your husband should leave, or he can be charged with trespassing. As far as I know, a company needs a state required 30.06 sign to restrict CONCEALED carry.


Everyone be very careful in taking this kind of legal advice. Every state has different CCW laws, and most don't have a mandated sign. In general, when you go into a business, you are what is called an "invitee" or a "licensee." That license can be conditional, and a no gun statement can be such a condition. If you violate the condition, you lose your license, and you are then a criminal trespasser. (BTW, I am a lawyer.)



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 06:21 PM
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hey op....that man of yours rates high in my book



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: GBP/JPY
hey op....that man of yours rates high in my book


He rates high in mine too.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: redhorse

I'm sensing an EMO wife but to be fair Combat arms PTSD?



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