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Tool talk with Nonspecific.

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posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrepid
a reply to: nonspecific

It's not just the tools though. It's the memories of Grandad teaching you how to use them too.

Can you even buy a hand planer new? Seems like a thing of the past. I've not seen a new one. I'm sure he had tools in there that one would go "WTF is that for?" They went back to just after the war. Probably older ones(then) as well. That was when people fixed things. Not just throw them out and buy a new one. He always complained about that.



You can definitely buy new hand planes, but plan on spending anywhere from $150-$300 each. I have a couple old Stanley plans that I restored and absolutely love them




posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 01:25 PM
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As long as its not Ryobi.

I guess they are okay drills if you are worried you might strip the screw.


But I need Tr00 Powah


IMHAO Milwaukee Tool makes some of the best stuff.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: Lysergic
As long as its not Ryobi.

I guess they are okay drills if you are worried you might strip the screw.


But I need Tr00 Powah


IMHAO Milwaukee Tool makes some of the best stuff.


Milwalke and Ryobi are now owned by the same company and I think a lot of it is made in the same factory.

I am not a great fan of Ryobi gear but some of the stuff I have used latley has seemed a bit better than it was.

The Milwalke gear I have used I have rated highly for the price and would go for a ryobi impact over the new dewalt after trying both.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 01:30 PM
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originally posted by: RainyState

originally posted by: intrepid
a reply to: nonspecific

It's not just the tools though. It's the memories of Grandad teaching you how to use them too.

Can you even buy a hand planer new? Seems like a thing of the past. I've not seen a new one. I'm sure he had tools in there that one would go "WTF is that for?" They went back to just after the war. Probably older ones(then) as well. That was when people fixed things. Not just throw them out and buy a new one. He always complained about that.



You can definitely buy new hand planes, but plan on spending anywhere from $150-$300 each. I have a couple old Stanley plans that I restored and absolutely love them


I am not sure I would pay that kind of money for a hand plane as not really a hand tool kind of bloke.

I have a stanley no.4 and block plane both about 40 years old that cost about 2 quid each and they are great, I have a Robert Sorby 400 that needs refurbishing that cost a quid and that will be as good as I will need when finished.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

I have a VERY small furniture business and a decent stock of woodworking tools. There's a funny thing about tools, you can have a shop loaded with different tools, but realistically you only use a handful of them. The rest are mostly for specific tasks that you may only end up using one or two times. It can get pretty expensive collecting these types, so thank goodness for eBay and Craigslist.

Then you have your "varsity team" of tools. My starting five are my table saw, mitre saw, router, dust collector, and band saw(which is also team captain). My bench player's are my jointer/planer, random orbital sander, belt sander, palm router, and Dremel. These are the jocks of the woodworking tool world, they get the publicity, fame and fortune.

Power tools are great and all, but any real woodworker will tell you that hand tools/skill tools is where the fun really happens. Hand planes, Japanese hand saws, coping saws, chisels, carving tools, and the ever important clamp.

Out of all of the tools that I have or had owned, an old Sterling-Packard WBS-14 bandsaw was my favorite. I loved to use it for quick cuts and cut patterns for routing. I've made some cool jewelry boxes and puzzle boxes. It was a great saw for an old Taiwanese import. Unfortunately she is no longer with us, a crack in the metal caused her demise, may she rest in peace.

My 10 commandments:
1) sharper is safer
2) dust collection/protection is a must
3) limit distractions
4) don't force it, let the tool do the work
5) always make sure you have the same amount of fingers you start with
6) pencils are like socks, they always seem to disappear
7) keep multiple sets of eye protection and ear protection around the shop
8) use the same measuring tool throughout the entire project
9) bandaids and tweezers are always good to keep handy
10) saw dust is man glitter

And always remember......
Measure twice, cut once......check fit, cuss, measure and cut again, cuss more on the drive to the lumber yard.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific

originally posted by: RainyState

originally posted by: intrepid
a reply to: nonspecific

It's not just the tools though. It's the memories of Grandad teaching you how to use them too.

Can you even buy a hand planer new? Seems like a thing of the past. I've not seen a new one. I'm sure he had tools in there that one would go "WTF is that for?" They went back to just after the war. Probably older ones(then) as well. That was when people fixed things. Not just throw them out and buy a new one. He always complained about that.



You can definitely buy new hand planes, but plan on spending anywhere from $150-$300 each. I have a couple old Stanley plans that I restored and absolutely love them


I am not sure I would pay that kind of money for a hand plane as not really a hand tool kind of bloke.

I have a stanley no.4 and block plane both about 40 years old that cost about 2 quid each and they are great, I have a Robert Sorby 400 that needs refurbishing that cost a quid and that will be as good as I will need when finished.


I'd never pay $100's for hand plane when you can find the older one's for a fraction of the cost. Plus, it's fun to restore them. You get a certain sense of pride and appreciation using them after bringing themback from the dead. You could spend a small fortune for new planes and chisels. I can't believe some of the prices I've seen for a chisel set.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: RainyState
a reply to: nonspecific

I have a VERY small furniture business and a decent stock of woodworking tools. There's a funny thing about tools, you can have a shop loaded with different tools, but realistically you only use a handful of them. The rest are mostly for specific tasks that you may only end up using one or two times. It can get pretty expensive collecting these types, so thank goodness for eBay and Craigslist.

Then you have your "varsity team" of tools. My starting five are my table saw, mitre saw, router, dust collector, and band saw(which is also team captain). My bench player's are my jointer/planer, random orbital sander, belt sander, palm router, and Dremel. These are the jocks of the woodworking tool world, they get the publicity, fame and fortune.

Power tools are great and all, but any real woodworker will tell you that hand tools/skill tools is where the fun really happens. Hand planes, Japanese hand saws, coping saws, chisels, carving tools, and the ever important clamp.

Out of all of the tools that I have or had owned, an old Sterling-Packard WBS-14 bandsaw was my favorite. I loved to use it for quick cuts and cut patterns for routing. I've made some cool jewelry boxes and puzzle boxes. It was a great saw for an old Taiwanese import. Unfortunately she is no longer with us, a crack in the metal caused her demise, may she rest in peace.

My 10 commandments:
1) sharper is safer
2) dust collection/protection is a must
3) limit distractions
4) don't force it, let the tool do the work
5) always make sure you have the same amount of fingers you start with
6) pencils are like socks, they always seem to disappear
7) keep multiple sets of eye protection and ear protection around the shop
8) use the same measuring tool throughout the entire project
9) bandaids and tweezers are always good to keep handy
10) saw dust is man glitter

And always remember......
Measure twice, cut once......check fit, cuss, measure and cut again, cuss more on the drive to the lumber yard.


Some good advice there in that top ten but I will add another if I may.

Never allow anything to make you work faster than you are comfortable with or longer than you can. Pretty much every accident I have ever had that resulted in an injury or a total cock up happened because I was rushing or under pressure to finish a job. I work out of a small shop in the garden and would happily tell a customer that I was running behind than risk hurting myself or messing up a job.

As to my main players top 5 are my table saw, radial arm saw, jointer/thicknesser Table mounted triton tra001 router and jigsaw(no bandsaw at the moment a nightmare).

After that I have an array of sanders and about 8 hand held routers from palm up to half inch workhorses that all get used a lot.

The other tool I could not be without is my air compressor, runs blowers for cleaning, nail guns, sanders and hvlp guns for finishing.

I use digital calipers a lot for setting up saws and routers ect and for measuring in general, best 8 quid I have ever spent.

Every now and again I realise I have too many tools and relagate stuff to another worksop so I can actually make stuff. My lathe and scroll saw went that way recently.

Next purchases are replacing things I no longer have, band saw, biscuit jointer a bench top morticer as have some kids rocking chairs to make a big batch of.

Happy woodworking.




posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

It's not fair to tease us. Tool porn should come with pictures.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: nonspecific

Will post more later when home. I have lots invested. My meteorology # is my prize though



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

i have more tools than i know what to do with.
about 20 years ago when i was still in the shop i got in the habit of buying anything i ever had to borrow. as soon as i had to borrow it once i bought it.
over the years i have built up a lot of #.

top and bottom monster with roller bearings.
of course all the common metric and standard hand tools
air tools. impacts. air drill. air hammers. die grinders. cut off wheels

i have a lot of specialty # too. axle nut kits. inner/outer tie rod kit
serp tool

in and around all that # is just lots of misc #.
then we have the floor jacks and stands. the creepers. fluid tubs. wheels and bits for this or that.

my metrology is the most expensive stuff i have right now

a person needs their tools

www.tooltopia.com is a great site for legit tools
edit on 20-11-2017 by TinySickTears because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
Oh, and by the way, if we are also permitted to talk about tools we would like...

I would like a six foot long, by three foot wide, by eight inch deep forge, and the space and necessary ventilation to use it. Old school style of course, with hand pump billows, burning wood and coke, not gas of any kind. And an anvil, of course, couple of good hammers. I would also like a flipping great big belt sanding machine.


I actually own a small coal fired forge and a lot of tools that go with it. It is actually my brothers and mine, it came from my stepfathers garage after he died. It has a hand crank blower on it. It looks like a big cast iron barbecue grill.He also had a big pot that runs off of propane that melts metals. It is a heavy cast iron one with a burner assembly on it. It would take a hell of a lot of propane to melt something down. I also got some cast iron ladles for it.

I plan on making something with it, I have all sorts of metals to make something out of. Organized of course, so I can find things when I need to.

It's sitting next to my seventy two viking snowmobile and by the old scale they used to use on farms. That is on theother side of the pathway leading to the back from the 67 buick electra.
edit on 20-11-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:10 PM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: rickymouse

i have more tools than i know what to do with.
about 20 years ago when i was still in the shop i got in the habit of buying anything i ever had to borrow. as soon as i had to borrow it once i bought it.
over the years i have built up a lot of #.

top and bottom monster with roller bearings.
of course all the common metric and standard hand tools
air tools. impacts. air drill. air hammers. die grinders. cut off wheels

i have a lot of specialty # too. axle nut kits. inner/outer tie rod kit
serp tool

in and around all that # is just lots of misc #.
then we have the floor jacks and stands. the creepers. fluid tubs. wheels and bits for this or that.

my metrology is the most expensive stuff i have right now

a person needs their tools

www.tooltopia.com is a great site for legit tools


I got my wife's uncle's calibration tools, all the micrometers and stuff from back in the seventies and eighties. He worked as a mechinist for ford motors in Detroit. Those things last forever as long as you take care of them. I also have a brake lathe I picked up, we do a lot of disks and some drums on it. I have almost everything you have.....are we related somehow?

I have complete axle and tie rod sets too, I actually have a lot of airtools, and also a lot of air spray paint guns, mostly binks and devilibus

It is a mental illness, I know that but still love to have tools, screw those who think I am crazy, I'll use my air screwdriver.
Darn batteries all went to hell on my cordless drills.
edit on 20-11-2017 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

He may ask you to adopt him for the inheritance.

I am considering it myself.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: nonspecific
a reply to: rickymouse

He may ask you to adopt him for the inheritance.

I am considering it myself.


I spend about two weeks a year cleaning up the tools to keep them from rusting. I also have three generators that need to be ran every fall, two smaller ones and one bigger one. The tractor needs the hydraulic filter changed every year or the pump whines when I lift the front end loader buckets. I also have a sixty three ford dumptruck, that needs to be started before it goes bad, it only has fifteen thousand miles on it. I even have a chainsaw saw mill and a Johnsered 111s saw. I start the saw about every two years, but it always almost jerks my elbow out of socket when it first fires. It has a thirty six inch bar on it.

It is a lot of work to have all those tools and equipment.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse

originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: rickymouse

i have more tools than i know what to do with.
about 20 years ago when i was still in the shop i got in the habit of buying anything i ever had to borrow. as soon as i had to borrow it once i bought it.
over the years i have built up a lot of #.

top and bottom monster with roller bearings.
of course all the common metric and standard hand tools
air tools. impacts. air drill. air hammers. die grinders. cut off wheels

i have a lot of specialty # too. axle nut kits. inner/outer tie rod kit
serp tool

in and around all that # is just lots of misc #.
then we have the floor jacks and stands. the creepers. fluid tubs. wheels and bits for this or that.

my metrology is the most expensive stuff i have right now

a person needs their tools

www.tooltopia.com is a great site for legit tools


I got my wife's uncle's calibration tools, all the micrometers and stuff from back in the seventies and eighties. He worked as a mechinist for ford motors in Detroit. Those things last forever as long as you take care of them. I also have a brake lathe I picked up, we do a lot of disks and some drums on it. I have almost everything you have.....are we related somehow?

I have complete axle and tie rod sets too, I actually have a lot of airtools, and also a lot of air spray paint guns, mostly binks and devilibus

It is a mental illness, I know that but still love to have tools, screw those who think I am crazy, I'll use my air screwdriver.
Darn batteries all went to hell on my cordless drills.


could be related yes.
i dont like to spend money on things except for going out to eat and tools. i mean i am not mr frugal but i do tend to by the cheaper end stuff with just about everything. clothes. dry goods for the house. kind of an in the middle or lower end dude.
tools though. i spend the money. honestly 80% of the stuff i have i will possibly never use or have/will rarely use.
you too probably.
i dont buy single sockets until after i have my 'set' though most of the # in the set you rarely need.
out of all your metric wrenches up to 21mm how many do you use a lot or more often than others.
8mm
10mm
13mm
15mm
19mm
21mm
but you know you have the 14 you will never use


you may use more if you work on tractors and #.
axle nut kit i will use 2 but there are 8. i need the kit though

i am rambling

my point is i will probably never stop.

had to edit. typed 18mm not 19mm
edit on 20-11-2017 by TinySickTears because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

There is always another tool and always a justification for buying it.



I have 8 routers and counting and I can justify evry one and all the ones I will need to get in the future.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:47 PM
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I have all the experience using those tools, I even was a certified mechanic for a few years, I took the tests the day my daughter was born, I left the wife at the hospital and got there late so I never got the master mechanic certification.

My daughter is thirty seven now.

Now after years of being a builder and learning many professions, I am back to studying my original interest, Medicine and Healthcare. Now my tool selections have changed. I am going to order about five endoscopy cameras to give out for christmas for me and my kids. www.amazon.com...=sr_1_17/141-8107512-6184320?ie=UTF8&qid=1511214186&sr=8- 17&keywords=endoscope+camera

They run between eight to sixteen bucks and not only can you look at your ear, you can use them for checking out things in your car and even to check out inside your furnace and so on till there is no end to the uses.


Don't own a phone, but I do have a computer and a laptop.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:50 PM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
a reply to: rickymouse

It's not fair to tease us. Tool porn should come with pictures.


If I started loading pictures, ATS would run out of data storage.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears




but you know you have the 14 you will never use


Oh hell yes , many hours spent on ebay looking for flexi head geared spanners that have all the sizes up to 26mm . Gearwrench covers this apart from the 26mm so i just bought an 1 inch which covers me needs for work ( linesman so lots of big bolts ) . Will i use every size , probably not but i just couldn't bear the thought of a gap . Apart from that its Makita 18v brushless anything .



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