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A question for the african-american ats members.

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(post by StunPrix removed for a manners violation)

posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: Lucidparadox

I understand residency being a pain to prove for some people...

But.

You generally have to present a photo ID in order to procure work. I believe that in most states you must present a valid photo ID in order to sign up for and receive any sort of public assistance. Obviously, a drivers license is a valid photo ID, which these folks also claim to not have....

My goodness! How are these people getting thru life with no photo ID???? Can’t work, can’t drive, can’t get free help....I think I would get off my duff and go get the damned ID, if for no other reason, then just to increase my odds of survival. That just boggles my mind, don’t have and cannot get a valid photo ID.....

Can’t even buy a pack of smokes or a drink....really?

I wonder if there’s any official figure as to just how many American adults are running around with no ID and no need for one.... cuz I’m having a really hard time believing that people are really letting a photo ID stand between themselves and having any sort of life...

I’m just not buying it that there are all of these American adults functioning in our society with no photo ID.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 11:09 PM
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originally posted by: dfnj2015
a reply to: scraedtosleep

The right uses all kinds of tactics for voter suppression. But nobody really likes democracy anyway.


So, how about all the ID and background check hoops required to purchase a firearm? Is it reasonable to assume the left uses all kinds of tactics to suppress exercise of Constitutional rights, or is that different because: reasons? Before you answer, let me remind you that the body count of spree shooters is still multiple factors of 10 below the body count for politicians' wars, platform policies, spending decisions, and frankly even enforcement choices regarding our laws... so the "lives are at risk where guns are concerned" argument isn't in any way logically divested from the importance of elections.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

How does requiring something that most all of us carry anyway equate to voter suppression? It's less than difficult to acquire a photo ID. As far as I know, it's free, as in costs nothing.

What a load of codswallop.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 05:15 AM
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a reply to: trollz


Show me a single case where a line of blacks are told the place is closed and forbidden from entering while whites stream in past them.
Show me a single case where all the blacks in line are told to wait while so the whites can go first.
Your argument is a lie.

Its not about black and white. its about poorer precincts being kept from voting. So happens theres more blacks in those precincts.

Your argument covers up the lie. The lie is its about race. The truth is its about money.

If you consider for one moment the elections are fair and legal, then you bought the lie.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 05:16 AM
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originally posted by: Lucidparadox
Proving residency is really difficult.

Im white, 28, good career. But I live in a situation that many people I know in African american communities do. I dont have any utilities in my name... and I know many people dont use/trust banks so bank statements cant be used either.

This makes proving residency difficult.

If you are an african american in the inner city, without a car, limited/stressed income, no access to your birth certificate or ss card, and you live with someone else/a group of people to be able to survive so you dont have any bills in your name...

I can see getting a government issued ID being difficult.

Think about the cost too.. an ID costs like $40, getting your birth certificate is another $25, sometimes theres a cost getting your social security card too.

Thats alot of money to some people and it can become a voting deterrent.


Too bad that isn't repeated more often.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: scraedtosleep

Kind of a racist post,your assuming all black people originated in Africa,there is proof that many had been here way before any slave trading,kind of a snowflake kind of explanation,not unlike someone who meets you and you have a spanish surname,and saying"boy I bet your mom makes great tacos!" dumbasses who should of kept mouth shut,gets some class then maybe someone will take you serious



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 07:52 AM
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a reply to: fiverx313

Chincoteague huh?! Well, what a small world indeed. Since you are from this area, you will know what I mean when I say I live near NASA, not far from T's corner. So, I guess I should say howdy neighbor.

Being from this area, I can personally confirm the trip to Onancock DMV is roughly 90 mins round trip. I have personally been to that DMV for various things, and while I can't vouch for your specific personal dealings, I will say that particular DMV is very laid back. Being a very small area, it's seems they have a different mentality. Way more laid back.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 10:52 AM
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I'm a black folk and I can't afford no ID. its 1915 and I live in duh farm in da souf

I r woman I no how to vote and I no defend self.. Please tell me what to do to dumb to stand up for self


/ end sarcasm

This is how the Democrats would have you believing about black people and women if you follow their logic



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: DustbowlDebutante

This article is spot on:

"Or, to put it more accurately, make it harder for some people to vote. In a careful, detailed, and absolutely devastating opinion for a unanimous three-judge panel, Judge Diana Motz demonstrated that the law “target[ed] African Americans with almost surgical precision”. The discriminatory intent that could be clearly inferred from the nature of the statute itself was not well hidden"


www.theguardian.com...



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: scraedtosleep

I've had two incidents in my life where id's issues were indeed very racist. I'm not black but I'm a minority woman.

DMV- Florida, We were new to the state.
I was required to get a special higher security drivers license, I foget what it was called. I asked them if it was absolutely required and was told yes, had to provide loads of documents. My husband goes the next day in and gets a regular drivers license, looks nothing like mine and cost less.

Voting - Wisconsin. Moved from one town to the next. Was registering for voting. Right on top of the sheet, it said if you have a Valid Drivers license you DO NOT need a Social Security card. I provided my valid DL and was asked for my Social Security card. I pointed to the sheet and read it back to them loudly and asked them if they understood what was was written and what it meant. They were all flustered and proceeded with my registration.

Now these are just two small examples. I provided a perfectly legitimate ID and was still questioned for more.
I'm all for having an ID for voting, but I am also for having poll workers not be racist, how do we test for that?????



While I can't comment on any other state I can tell you your experience in FL most likely had nothing to do with race. Everyone in FL and other states will be required to upgrade to the "REAL ID" per the "REAL ID act of 2005". The time and requirements to upgrade to this ID are different for each person and depend on when the original ID was issued. If you are renewing most likely you will be required to upgrade. If you are not up for renewal the DMV may issues older licenses up until 10/1/2020. Every person in every state will be required to have an upgraded ID by that date to board any flight or have access to any higher security area..


Das Papers maybe but not racist.



The federal REAL ID Act of 2005 sets new standards for the issuance of driver licenses and identification cards.


LINK



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: GuidedKill

My husband and I weren't renewing, we both moved into the state and getting new licenses. We both had licenses that weren't close to expiring or up for renewal from another sate.
The only difference is that we did it one day apart.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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fascinating that all of you on the right insist that there isn't any voter suppression, have not bothered to research the reasons given by the various organizations and people that it directly affects...you all assume it B.S., and thus simply dismiss it outright...



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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originally posted by: fiverx313
doesn't seem like a leap to me. it didn't make the process more secure. it makes it hard to get a proper ID to be able to vote. it most affects people who don't have good transportation option or spare time, aka our working poor.

Or...and hear me out, here...the law is meant to ensure that the right to vote that exists solely for American citizens is protected from potential fraud and abuse.

Whether or not that creates a momentary inconvenience is generally irrelevant to the bigger picture.

There are, generally speaking, two years between votes, four years for most people who only pay attention to presidential elections. If you are trying to say that, in the 729 days between voting (at the least, 1,460 days at the most) that people have, they couldn't find a way on one of those days to get a state or other accepted ID?

And that because of their failure to do so, that makes the law racist?

This isn't a leap in logic, it's a lack thereof.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:49 PM
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Perhaps the people with no photo ID take More from society than they give to society.

They would most likely vote for the candidate that promised them more free stuff.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 03:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
Except when you show up to vote the polling center is 'closed', or so slow it takes hours waiting on line or the machines are 'broke' or the voting register is 'misplaced' or your name isn't in it.

How many unfair practices loopholes are there, 'legally'?

Oh, so many things that happen to affect all races of people trying to vote in any given precinct anywhere?

But, yes, that's proves the racism...



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

This is not just about ID's, although that is probably one of the most obvious ones. But as I mentioned in my earlier post, I had a legitimate ID and I was still asked for more, my SS card!

Some places research who is voting and when, and then adjust the voting schedule based on that. So let's say for example that an area with a large hispanic distric votes mostly on Sundays, so they close down Sunday voting. They are actually researching and doing stuff like this. How can that not be about race, or at the very least about the poor.
They have used tactics like cutting back on voting days, on voting hours, voting locations etc. This has a huge impact on swing states, they are calling it the new battleground. Polling places that have been around for decades are now being "moved"



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 04:33 PM
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originally posted by: JAGStorm
a reply to: SlapMonkey

This is not just about ID's, although that is probably one of the most obvious ones. But as I mentioned in my earlier post, I had a legitimate ID and I was still asked for more, my SS card!

*gasp*

THE HORROR!!! Someone, who mutters the same words all of the time, every day, asked for both forms of ID--and then even though they may have gotten a little snotty with you after you 'got loud' with them, still got you the ID as they're supposed to.

I'm an average white guy, and I have been given the runarounds numerous times in my 38 years of life when dealing with government agencies and trying to get things like birth certificates, or even IDs. And I've also had some of the easiest processes getting the same things, too. It all depends on the competency of the person at the desk.


Some places research who is voting and when, and then adjust the voting schedule based on that. So let's say for example that an area with a large hispanic distric votes mostly on Sundays, so they close down Sunday voting. They are actually researching and doing stuff like this. How can that not be about race, or at the very least about the poor.
They have used tactics like cutting back on voting days, on voting hours, voting locations etc. This has a huge impact on swing states, they are calling it the new battleground. Polling places that have been around for decades are now being "moved"

And if some places are doing that, it's wrong, unless there are other reasons for it, such as not enough volunteers, or other issues with voting booths and whatnot. But the thing of it is, voting hours must be posted and available for all to see prior to days that the polling locations are open, so people can plan for this stuff.

Here's another dramatic gasp...

*gasp*

Did you know that, here in KY, we only get one day to vote, and it's on a Tuesday? We don't have early-voting options (other than absentee ballots), so we all must find time on one day to make it into the polls. And guess what...everything goes fine, and the dramatic majority of people don't whine or moan about it. It's the way that it is, and people plan accordingly.

Voting is a right, for sure, but it's neither mandatory nor is it the federal government's job to ensure that people have the necessary documentation, including IDs, or transportation to and from the polling locations. If people who are adult enough to vote can't figure this all out in between one voting season and the next, then I don't know what to tell you, but it's not our job to hold the hand of everyone who complains and make voting lack any inconvenience.

You know, I missed my first chance to vote because I was stationed in Kitzingen, Germany, in 2000, and I didn't understand the absentee ballot process. So, I was serving my country, and because of that, I missed out on my chance to vote. But I didn't blame anyone but myself, you know why? Because I could have figured it out if I had wanted to vote that badly enough.

I then missed the vote in 2004 because I had to do unexpected travel out of state that day. I didn't complain about that inconvenience, either, because I understand that, sometimes, life has curveballs that stop things from happening.

I haven't missed a vote since, even though I've moved six times since then--because voting is important to me, and I plan ahead.

People can make up all of the excuses that they want to, but honestly, except for a few extreme circumstances, these excuses are going to fall on deaf ears because most adults know how to make things happen and plan ahead.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 04:44 PM
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edit on 11/21/2017 by Blaine91555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: RickyD
a reply to: dfnj2015

Secondly as far as I'm aware there is no difference in the process to obtain said ID for any race...so same for me as everyone else. So how does requiring an ID discriminate against anyone if a black guy or a hispanic guy obtain an ID the same way I do (I'm white)?


Well if you are not here legally, you are disenfranchised according to some. Up

That's the mentality we are up against.




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