It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Piano and sound waves

page: 2
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 23 2017 @ 12:07 AM
link   
Ok thanks. Will chk it out




posted on Nov, 27 2017 @ 02:23 AM
link   
Church organs are completely engineered for the religious experience. One of the remaining great temple machines. Crying statues have nothing on church organs + frankincense.

If you dont know what goes into designing a church organ, and why, just consider this: its a feat of engineering matching it to the the building.

PS, I've been playing with waves my whole life. I dont have a clue what a note, pitch or any of that is. Really seems irrelevant. Sound has frequency distortion amplitude punctuation and harmonics. Music shouldn't be any more complicated than that. Wtf is tone, wtf is pitch? Chords remind you of angels. Emotional manipulation is not really a good quality of a signal.



posted on Nov, 28 2017 @ 12:13 AM
link   
a reply to: AdKiller

All the music theory has been created to make music look more complicated, than it should be. So yes you are corrct



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 07:55 PM
link   

originally posted by: Hyperboles
Well for starters, is there science behind sound waves created out of musical instruments? Sure some of them sound good, but do they affect our well being? Am beginner on the piano and a great deal is made out of chords rather than notes. notes sound good but chords sound too metallic. So what are the chords that sound good and are beneficial for the mind and body.


There sure is. Some people have mentioned music theory concepts but there is a deeper level of science at work here.
If you play a note it will create a wave. There is another note above it that you will eventually get to as you go higher up in pitch which rings at exactly 1/2 of the frequency of the original note.
This is called the octave and is a higher version of the fundamental note.

So if your first note is C (which exists at a specific frequency, A is 440 mh, I don't know what C is) then the octave C is exactly 1/2 the frequency of the original C.

The next related frequency would obviously be at 1/4 of the original. This note is the perfect 5th and would be a G.

We keep going on like this and we end up with 12 notes in all. The 12th note is the octave C.
The 8 most constant notes form the major scale. All 12 notes in a row are "half steps" and form the chromatic scale.

Then we can take the major scale (8 of the 12 notes, including the octave) and using the other 4 notes we can make all the scales and music theory and all that.
But your original question is answered by understanding that these notes are not made up at random but exist at specific ratios of the wavelengths. One, 1/2, 1/4, and so on.

When you ring a note on a string you will get natural overtones that ring out above it. Those overtones are the octave - 1/2, another octave, then the 5th and so on.

There is a lot more to it but I'm just trying to touch on the basic idea.

Also the #4 or tri tone isn't really that dissonant at all. Real dissonance comes when you ring notes together that are in between the 1/2 step notes of the chromatic scale. The major chord with a tri-tone in it is actually hauntingly beautiful. It's in movie scores all the time.
Our ears can hear about 3 or 4 notes in between each half step, you could call these "out of tune" notes. When you start ringing these micro-tones together things get really ugly.
These are the sounds you hear from metal scraping or non-musical sounds or instruments that are very out of tune.


As for what is beneficial, that is subjective. If some type of music makes you feel good then thats it, it works for you.
Metal and heavy classical is good for anger release. Ambient and Karnatic (Indian) is great for meditation and reflection. Whatever you like is beneficial.



posted on Nov, 30 2017 @ 11:25 PM
link   
a reply to: joelr

Thanks mate. Tho im familiar of harmonics of a base frequency. Im progressing slowly with practicals, and theory not so much, but i'll get there



posted on Dec, 1 2017 @ 03:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Hyperboles
Well for starters, is there science behind sound waves created out of musical instruments? Sure some of them sound good, but do they affect our well being?

I took a pretty interesting course in the physics of music when I was in college.



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 12:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Hyperboles
Well for starters, is there science behind sound waves created out of musical instruments? Sure some of them sound good, but do they affect our well being?

I took a pretty interesting course in the physics of music when I was in college.
Im sure there is physics to music. But music theory in itself is confusing for beginners



posted on Dec, 2 2017 @ 12:42 PM
link   
a reply to: Hyperboles
Tesla said it. Einstein agreed. Science proved it. It is a known fact that everything — including our own bodies — is made up of energy vibrating at different frequencies. That being said, it seems logical to wonder, can sound frequencies affect us?

HERE’S WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER CONVERTING YOUR MUSIC TO A=432 HZ

Most music worldwide has been tuned to A=440 Hz since the International Standards Organization (ISO) promoted it in 1953. However, when looking at the vibratory nature of the universe, it’s possible that this pitch is disharmonious with the natural resonance of nature and may generate negative effects on human behaviour and consciousness.

Some theories (although unproven) even suggest that the Nazi regime had been in favour of adopting this pitch as standard after conducting scientific research to determine which range of frequencies best induce fear and aggression. Whether or not the conspiracy is factual, interesting studies have pointed toward the benefits of tuning music to A=432 Hz instead.
www.collective-evolution.com...

edit on 2-12-2017 by Itisnowagain because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 12:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Itisnowagain

Wow thanks. I was not aware of all this



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 06:35 AM
link   
Here's a restless baby reacting to harp music:



www.youtube.com...



posted on Dec, 3 2017 @ 12:31 PM
link   
a reply to: wildespace

Wow thats nice



posted on Dec, 4 2017 @ 09:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: Itisnowagain
a reply to: Hyperboles
Tesla said it. Einstein agreed. Science proved it. It is a known fact that everything — including our own bodies — is made up of energy vibrating at different frequencies. That being said, it seems logical to wonder, can sound frequencies affect us?

HERE’S WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER CONVERTING YOUR MUSIC TO A=432 HZ

Most music worldwide has been tuned to A=440 Hz since the International Standards Organization (ISO) promoted it in 1953. However, when looking at the vibratory nature of the universe, it’s possible that this pitch is disharmonious with the natural resonance of nature and may generate negative effects on human behaviour and consciousneward the benefits of tuning music to A=432 Hz instead.
www.collective-evolution.com...


I can't find anything that naturally resonates at 432 HZ?? This sounds like Bro-science:

Atoms in a crystalline lattice are typically of the order of 10^13 Hz, and it changes for different materials.

The frequency of the heart fluctuates between approximately 1 Hz to 2.5Hz. It does not have a steady frequency that can be multiplied to achieve 432 Hz.

Brainwaves or Neural Oscillations range between approximately 1 Hz and 70 Hz and are not tuned to 8 Hz or other divisions of 432 Hz in any way.

The Schumann resonance is a set of electromagnetic oscillations that originate from earth. One of them currently resonates at an average of 7.83Hz and not 8 Hz. which if multiplied by 55 gives us an A=430.65 Hz. Close, but no cigar.

Astronomers at Stanford have recorded super sonic oscillations from the sun at around 5.964 GHz. They had to slow them down (change their pitch) by 42,000 times to accidentally hit the frequency of 142 Hz - and not 144 as claimed by some which would again bring us a frequency of A=426Hz.

Water molecules can vibrate in a wide band of extremely high frequencies close to the infrared spectrum (90–110 Tera Hz). The band is wide enough to not favor any specific frequency, let alone 432 Hz.



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 03:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: Itisnowagain
a reply to: Hyperboles
Tesla said it. Einstein agreed. Science proved it. It is a known fact that everything — including our own bodies — is made up of energy vibrating at different frequencies. That being said, it seems logical to wonder, can sound frequencies affect us?

HERE’S WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER CONVERTING YOUR MUSIC TO A=432 HZ

Most music worldwide has been tuned to A=440 Hz since the International Standards Organization (ISO) promoted it in 1953. However, when looking at the vibratory nature of the universe, it’s possible that this pitch is disharmonious with the natural resonance of nature and may generate negative effects on human behaviour and consciousness.

Some theories (although unproven) even suggest that the Nazi regime had been in favour of adopting this pitch as standard after conducting scientific research to determine which range of frequencies best induce fear and aggression. Whether or not the conspiracy is factual, interesting studies have pointed toward the benefits of tuning music to A=432 Hz instead.
www.collective-evolution.com...

The author of that link says "I cannot state with complete certainty that every idea suggested in this article is 100% accurate, nor am I an expert on the subject." which I interpret to mean "some of this could be complete bullsh** and I wouldn't know any better", which is apparently the case. He cites his source for the 432 HZ which talks about Saturn's Procession [sic].

omega432.com...

A measured phenomenon of effect that may support the idea of using A=432hz and 256Hz as a scientific concert pitch is also based on the amount of partials of A=432Hz from a musical scale that seem to correlate to organic systems and the measurement of planetary movement, the Sun and Saturn for example. Saturn is one of the solar systems accurate time pieces and it orbits the procession ever 864 of its years (432 x 2).
I'm aware of the astronomical term "Precession" which talks about how the spin of planets wobbles over time similar to how a spinning top wobbles...if that's what he's talking about "Procession" isn't even the correct word, and his data doesn't seem to match the precession of Saturn either. But let's set that aside for the sake of exploring this claim further. He's talking about something that happens every 864 of Saturn's years each of which is 29.4571 for a total period of 25451 earth years.

How can any thinking person think there's any correlation between something that happens with a planet far away every 25, 451 Earth years, and the frequency of the note "A" which is 440 (or should be 432 according to that site) cycles per second? Even if you could correlate something natural with Saturn being 432 (and this has not been demonstrated in a way that makes any sense", Saturn's precession isn't even a natural frequency, it's been changing for eons due to a tug of war with Neptune:

Why Is Saturn Tipsy?

Douglas P. Hamilton (University of Maryland) and William R. Ward (Southwest Research Institute) think they’ve finally cracked the secret of Saturn’s tilt. On October 10th, at a meeting of the American Astronomical Society’s Division for Planetary Sciences, they revealed that the planet has a previously unappreciated long-distance relationship with Neptune. The plane of Neptune’s orbit shifts around the Sun (its line of nodes regresses) in a cycle lasting 1.87 million years. Meanwhile, Saturn’s rotation axis precesses (mimicking the wobble of a spinning top) every 1.83 million years. This close match is no coincidence, say Hamilton and Ward.

They believe Saturn’s precession probably started out quite fast, then gradually slowed; once it equaled the rate of Neptune’s nodal regression, the two planets became gravitationally locked in a spin-orbit resonance that pushed Saturn’s tilt, or obliquity, to 4° or 5° early in solar-system history. At that time the orbit of Neptune was evolving dramatically, which eventually caused Saturn's obliquity to jump to the current value of 27°.

Even though Neptune is the smaller world, its motion around the Sun carries roughly 10,000 times the angular momentum of Saturn’s spin. Once this reservoir is tapped, Hamilton explains, “Neptune can tip Saturn over and not even break a sweat.” And this interplay is not yet over, Ward adds: the spin axis's precession rate and obliquity will likely creep upward in the future.

So as that link says the precessional perion of Saturn is 1.83 million Earth years, not 25451 Earth years as the author of this omega432 site implies, and it's not a stable or natural frequency, it's been changing and we expect it to continue to change for the reasons stated.

Even if Saturn's precession was stable at 1.83 million earth years, compare the frequency of that with the frequency of A. There are 31557600 seconds in a year so that's 5.575041E13 seconds, which is a frequency of 1/5.575041E13 or .00000000000001731 cycles per second versus 440 cycles per second. It takes a really special kind of crackpot to think those two numbers are related, and that still holds true even if you use the author's incorrect period of 25451 Earth years.


edit on 2017125 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Dec, 5 2017 @ 03:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: Hyperboles
Im sure there is physics to music. But music theory in itself is confusing for beginners

I guess so. When it comes to various theories on musical notation, some can be a little baffling, however, sheet music, which has been standardized for centuries is simple enough that little kids learn it all the time.



posted on Dec, 6 2017 @ 01:10 AM
link   

originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Hyperboles
Im sure there is physics to music. But music theory in itself is confusing for beginners

I guess so. When it comes to various theories on musical notation, some can be a little baffling, however, sheet music, which has been standardized for centuries is simple enough that little kids learn it all the time.


Sheet music, music notation (notes and rests on the staff) is just reading music. It's not really music theory.
If you read for a long time going through method book(s) eventually you understand basic theory from learning the 12 keys and see how the basic scales and chords are built. Then more advanced theory starts to make sense because you have a framework to relate it to.



posted on Dec, 6 2017 @ 08:51 AM
link   
a reply to: Arbitrageur

Thanks for your post. Lol lot of science there to wrap your mind around it. I have not watched that video yet.
Tho if there is something magical about 432 hz, theres got to be some tangible proof for it.
I'll look see on the net if indeed i can find some



posted on Dec, 6 2017 @ 08:59 AM
link   
When the sheet music is in alphabetical letters i can read it. but the curly joes not as yet.

reply to blue shift
edit on 6-12-2017 by Hyperboles because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2017 @ 02:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Itisnowagain

I'm sorry, but this is a load of hogwash. There is nothing magical about any given reference pitch. The whole "432hz tuning" thing is a load of nonsensical bollocks.




top topics



 
5
<< 1   >>

log in

join