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Piano and sound waves

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posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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Well for starters, is there science behind sound waves created out of musical instruments? Sure some of them sound good, but do they affect our well being? Am beginner on the piano and a great deal is made out of chords rather than notes. notes sound good but chords sound too metallic. So what are the chords that sound good and are beneficial for the mind and body.




posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles

Music touches the root of the soul:




posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:43 AM
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play major 7ths



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:45 AM
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www.piano-play-it.com...
edit on 19-11-2017 by 711117 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 06:00 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles

It's all about harmony/harmonics and resonance. Notice how the root note the third and fifth make up a basic chord, if we flatten the third we get a minor chord and a distinctly sad or mournful sound. Also there are only 12 distinct semi tones before the octave. By creating different arrangements of these tones played at the same time we get all the possible chords. Use your own ears to work out what sounds you like and which you don't and then compare how the different variations sound alongside each other. You'll be playing jazz in no time


Music affects our emotions and mood, so in turn can affect our health, by say reducing stress and such.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 06:50 AM
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a reply to: dfnj2015
I covered that song on YouTube

Excellent choice!



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 09:33 AM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
Well for starters, is there science behind sound waves created out of musical instruments? Sure some of them sound good, but do they affect our well being? Am beginner on the piano and a great deal is made out of chords rather than notes. notes sound good but chords sound too metallic. So what are the chords that sound good and are beneficial for the mind and body.


Yes, there are and has been. A musician, guitar and keyboard player over 50 years...Ive delved into this in depth. In college in the 80's...I created a meditation method with my piano/synth and the 13 notes of a chromatic scale ie: C,C#,D, Eb, F, F#, G, G#-Ab, A, Bb, B and the octave of C.

I assigned one of 12 (13/w the octave) colors to each individual note. With a 10 finger spread of the keys, the "color organ" would go thru color hues quite different. As well? One could "see" blue", hear "red" etc....quite interesting.

Should you want to delve deeper...hit me up. Also? Another technique was to use headphones...hit 1 note on "hold" for 5 minutes....add another note to it...again add another in 5 more, creating either "happy", "sad" or "heavenly-angelic like" triad(3-note) chords. Save it...and use frequently for meditation.

Cya...!
MS
edit on 19-11-2017 by mysterioustranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:17 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Thanks, although all this is way over my head. Lol at the moment am learning nursery rhymes



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: Hyperboles
You could look up Body Resonance and start from there. What is a musical instrument? It's just a tool to create sound, harmonic sound or not, but sound nonetheless.There is a very big field of research going on now on how it affects the human body and mind.
Some people have turned it into weapons so there must be a cause that enhances the mind, you just have to search.
There are plenty of charlatans that will sell you sound equipment to take you to a higher plane.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: surfer_soul

Thanks my interest is mainly in southern country Gospel music



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:23 PM
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a reply to: crayzeed

Yes research has been done and they claim plants grow better and cows yield more milk



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: Hyperboles

I found musical theory really confusing when learning, and still do to an extent. My best advice is to use your ears and don't get caught up in theory. Also there are some excellent instructional videos freely available on YouTube



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: Hyperboles
a reply to: surfer_soul

Thanks my interest is mainly in southern country Gospel music
Just don't play an augmented fourth unless you're into devil-worship, lol.

Why is the Augmented 4th the "chord of evil" that was banned in Renaissance church music?

IN THOSE days composing music was very much an act of praising God. The music should therefore be beautiful and moving. The Augmented 4th, or Tritonus, which spans three whole steps in the scale, is one of the most dissonant musical intervals around. It was considered unpleasant and ugly, and was named "diabolus in musica" - "the devil in music" - and you wouldn't use anything diabolical to praise the Lord, would you?


Just kidding but it does sound pretty awful, and for this reason some trains blow horns when approaching railroad crossings at this interval, because it's a grinding unpleasant sound meant to get people's attention so they don't get run over by the train. You'll figure out what you like but there are many different chords, and it really seems too complex a subject to explain in a single forum reply, but this attempts to explain a few basics:


HARMONIES are created by notes sounding together at frequencies which are in proportion to each other. The proportions can be expressed by numbers. Low numbers produce consonant harmonies, and higher numbers give rise to dissonance. For example, if two notes an octave apart are sounded together, the frequency of the upper note is exactly double that of the lower. In numerical terms, upper doh over lower doh = 2:1. The sound is clear, pure and open. Sound sol above doh (the perfect fifth) and the proportion is 3:2. This sound is brilliant, confident. Sound fa over doh (the perfect fourth) and this gives 4:3. The word "amen" is often set to these notes. These two intervals are inversions of each other: doh above sol gives 4:3 and doh over fa gives 3:2. Mi over doh (the major third) is 5:4, a lovely interval expressing warmth, gentleness, "togetherness" and much more; its inversion, doh over mi (the minor sixth) gives 8:5, a curiously astringent but also beautiful interval. Doh over la (the minor third) gives 6:5; and la over doh (the major sixth) gives 5:3 - two more beautiful harmonies. Over-simplifying things: these, and a few other intervals, provide the structure, the skeleton, on which most Western music since the Renaissance is supported.


If you don't know these terms "doh", "fa" etc, you could watch "The Sound of Music" video a few times.



edit on 20171119 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Wow that should keep me busy for a while. Thanks
Sound of music was an absolute masterpiece



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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originally posted by: surfer_soul
a reply to: Hyperboles

I found musical theory really confusing when learning, and still do to an extent. My best advice is to use your ears and don't get caught up in theory. Also there are some excellent instructional videos freely available on YouTube
Yes the theory is quite confusing and often garbled in most of the you tube videos. you are right about ear being the ultimate judge of what sounds you make on any musical instrument.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 12:40 AM
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posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: Hyperboles




Am beginner on the piano and a great deal is made out of chords rather than notes. notes sound good but chords sound too metallic


Maybe study some musical theory.

Listen to music - because most nice music does use chords

Without knowing which chords you're referring to, the "metallic" descriptor is meh.



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:51 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: Hyperboles




Am beginner on the piano and a great deal is made out of chords rather than notes. notes sound good but chords sound too metallic


Maybe study some musical theory.

Listen to music - because most nice music does use chords

Without knowing which chords you're referring to, the "metallic" descriptor is meh.

I am not at a stage where i can name any chord. Just some chords on youtube that i have heard



posted on Nov, 20 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Thanks mate



posted on Nov, 22 2017 @ 12:22 PM
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Sound Healing
foreverconscious.com...




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