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Could you pull the trigger?

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posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: JBurns


I should remind you that she is fully aware these are fictional scenarios yet still has instinctual responses to the events.

I'm glad you made mention of that.

The thing is is that if a parent would raise their self a 'roughin' I'm sorry to say that 'roughin' is a bad apple and should be spat.

Indoctrination can be used as a weapon as much as a tool of deceit. Therefore the responsibility of the child's death lies in the hands of the parent. Why are guns different from pharmaceuticals/poisons?

I only read the op and had to inject thusly. Sorry OP




posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: Noncents

16.

His age is utterly immaterial as to the rest of what I said, so I don't know why you need to know that before you can address the rest of my comment. You train for as many things as possible. As a cop, you're not terribly likely to shoot anybody, adult or not, yet you still train for it. You're not likely to have to do CPR on an infant, yet you still train for it. You're not likely to have to respond to an active shooter at a school, yet you still train for it.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: Noncents

16.

Thank you for clearing that up. I see that fits what I was thinking about him to start off with. I can see older teens doing something like that and wouldn't have as much of a problem if there was one in that scenario.

Now, does this happen often with 10-12 year olds? I don't think so.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Could I pull the trigger?

Probably not.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:53 PM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: JBurns

Could I pull the trigger?

Probably not.


I didn't figure you could. I couldn't. I doubt most good people would be able to.

Good people don't kill kids.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

I love when they take reporters to these things. Most of them wipe the smug look off their face after they shoot an unarmed person, realizing that sometimes you have to. And other such scenarios.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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a reply to: Noncents


Now, does this happen often with 10-12 year olds? I don't think so.


For a third time: shootings don't happen "that often" either so why train for it, right? I never claimed that it happened often, so I don't know why you're so fixated on that point.

Well, I do, but you don't seem to want to address the actual point being made. All good



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:55 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
For a third time: shootings don't happen "that often" either so why train for it, right?

Shooting do happen often.

I did address the point being made when I said I wouldn't have as much of a problem with it if there was an older teenager in the scenario. Having a kid there is just messed up to me.

I am sorry that you are having problems understanding where I'm coming from. I'll try to be more clear. I think this scenario does more harm than good because the odds of this happening are so low that most people will never be in that situtaion. Kids and CPR is a bad example, that's actually fairly common. School violence and shootings aren't super uncommon any more either, sadly.

This scenario, I bet hasn't happened often at all.
edit on 18-11-2017 by Noncents because: Expanded



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:58 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: JBurns

Could I pull the trigger?

Probably not.


I didn't figure you could. I couldn't. I doubt most good people would be able to.

Good people don't kill kids.


In the hypothetical video...the good officer got shot and a child turned the same gun at you. You will just take a bullet and possibly get killed rather than shoot the being pointing a gun at you? That is not good....that is simply stupidity and worthy of a Darwin award.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents

originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: Noncents

16.

Thank you for clearing that up. I see that fits what I was thinking about him to start off with. I can see older teens doing something like that and wouldn't have as much of a problem if there was one in that scenario.

Now, does this happen often with 10-12 year olds? I don't think so.
they passed a law where parents are responsible for there child's actions as long as they live under there roof,because you would be surprised how many 10 year olds were used as assassins, because the judicial system looks at them as a juvenile so they would not be tried as a adult.....



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: CynConcepts

Some have what it takes to do the hard things.

I don't know if I have what it takes.

It's not a Darwin-worthy trait, in my humble opinion.

It's just something some can't do.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Lots of bennies to being an officer but it's not
for me at all. I'd nut up on a lot of the domestics,
the accidents would become night terrors especially
with kids involved. Not to mention the lengthy spells
of routine, uneventful, boring calls that serve mainly
to set you up for that one hair riasing adrenaline rush.
That's the really messed up part, when it goes from
pencil pushing to suddernly making ultimate decisions
in less than a few seconds. And you're depended on
to make the right call. Not just any call. Nah I know my
limitations and I prefer to leave all that up to the right
kind of people. They deserve a good living for doing it as
well.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:02 PM
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a reply to: CynConcepts
Call me stupid if you want. That's awfully decent of you.

Nope, I couldn't kill a kid. I'm honestly sorry to hear that you would.
edit on 18-11-2017 by Noncents because: Correction!



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:02 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents

originally posted by: Shamrock6
For a third time: shootings don't happen "that often" either so why train for it, right?

Shooting do happen often.

2nd line.


You're right, in our entire country that has something like a billion police/public interactions per year, there's a shooting by law enforcement at least a few times a day. Yet the overwhelming majority of officers will never shoot anybody. So, for the fourth time, why bother training for it? The odds are pretty slim that any one officer will ever have to shoot anybody.
edit on 18-11-2017 by Shamrock6 because: (no reason given)


Edit for edit: no need to apologize buddy, I understand where you’re coming from. Just because I don’t agree with you that you shouldn’t train for things that aren’t likely to happen doesn’t mean I don’t understand your point.
edit on 18-11-2017 by Shamrock6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:04 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents

originally posted by: Shamrock6
For a third time: shootings don't happen "that often" either so why train for it, right?

Shooting do happen often.

I did address the point being made when I said I wouldn't have as much of a problem with it if there was an older teenager in the scenario. Having a kid there is just messed up to me.

I am sorry that you are having problems understanding where I'm coming from. I'll try to be more clear. I think this scenario does more harm than good because the odds of this happening are so low that most people will never be in that situtaion. Kids and CPR is a bad example, that's actually fairly common. School violence and shootings aren't super uncommon any more either, sadly.

This scenario, I bet hasn't happened often at all.



Most Officers go their whole career without firing a single shot. What is wrong with the kids age? Head to the ghetto and 10-12 year olds are banging with guns all the time.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:06 PM
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Nevermind.
edit on 18-11-2017 by Noncents because: Bailing out. Have fun.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:12 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

I've thankfully never been in that situation, but I have to believe seeing the first officer shot makes the decision to act simpler (not easier) for the second officer. If a child had a firearm an officer would be struggling with a number of hypothetical (is it a real gun? Does this kid know how to fire it? Is it loaded? Is the kid dissociated enough to actually shoot a person?) questions. The shooting of Officer #1 answers those hypothetical and, I would believe, simplify the decision to neutralize the threat. That's another point here, if you view things at the specific time in terms of threat and personal preservation instead of "a child has a gun," then it becomes a discipline of thought and training issue.

The scars would be with you forever, though. I reckon it's better to be alive with scars than dead.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:13 PM
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originally posted by: Noncents
a reply to: CynConcepts
Call me stupid if you want. That's awfully decent of you.

Nope, I couldn't kill a kid. I'm honestly sorry to hear that you would.


I must admit that your post I replied to intimated that anyone who would shoot that girl in the video was NOT a good person. That was quite a snub.

Regarding the training video, I think it is wise to train for the unexpected. I have family who are LEO. They have young children and they want to always come home to their families. Their children love them too and would not want them to die unnecessarily.

Obviously, if an officer could not shoot the girl in this training video, he should not be a LEO. Not only is their life on the line, but their partners and innocent citizens that may be nearby and suffer from a stray shot.

If you read my first post, I stated even though I would shoot her...I would never want to be in that position. I cried watching the video. My tears were for the connection to the journalist who instinctively shot the child. It was a complete mind f**k!
edit on 11 18 2017 by CynConcepts because: Spelling



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:21 PM
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i believe in equality. yeah without a second thought



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: JBurns

I've thankfully never been in that situation, but I have to believe seeing the first officer shot makes the decision to act simpler (not easier) for the second officer. If a child had a firearm an officer would be struggling with a number of hypothetical (is it a real gun? Does this kid know how to fire it? Is it loaded? Is the kid dissociated enough to actually shoot a person?) questions. The shooting of Officer #1 answers those hypothetical and, I would believe, simplify the decision to neutralize the threat. That's another point here, if you view things at the specific time in terms of threat and personal preservation instead of "a child has a gun," then it becomes a discipline of thought and training issue.

The scars would be with you forever, though. I reckon it's better to be alive with scars than dead.

The first officer got shot like I said before, action over rides reaction the kids action trumped his reaction...
I agree one hundred present I would neutralize the threat.
Telling the kid to drop it would only give the kid the advantage for another action that I would loose advantage by having to react and possibly be shot as well...



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