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100 full moons - Blazing fireball lights up Arctic sky

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posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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Sure seems like a lot of fireballs lately. Google for Fireballs


A blazing fireball lit up the dark skies of Arctic Finland for five seconds, giving off what scientists said was "the glow of 100 full moons" and igniting hurried attempts to find the reported meteorite.


I know the Leonids meteor shower is going on now, but I am not sure all the fireballs have been part of it.


The Norwegian meteorite network said the fireball "had the glow of 100 full moons" and likely was going northeast, perhaps "to the Norwegian peninsula of Varanger," north of where the borders of Russia, Finland and Norway meet.


I have even seen a few this year. Would love to get my hands on one $$$


Kohout said scientists looked forward to any space debris they can get their hands on. "We are happy to recover (it) since this is a unique opportunity to get otherwise inaccessible space material," said Kohout. "This is why it's worth it to search for them."


Keep Looking Up


Story Source
edit on 18-11-2017 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars
Sure seems like a lot of fireballs lately.
Keep Looking Up


Story Source


There's a video of it at this link,

www.cbsnews.com...



Added,

edit on 18-11-2017 by smurfy because: Video.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Thanks smurfy



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

Here's a video of the said fireball caught on livestream.
Fireball video

Remember that big one in Russia a few years back? The next week or two there was a bunch of slightly smaller but just as "rare" that didn't get hardly any attention....

They're more common than you might think.
Brazilian Tunguska Event

Extremely important issue to face as a species IMO...

-Driver



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: LookingAtMars

The correct term is Bolide, this seems to have matched the definition.

They are scrambling to look for it because the odds of finding bits and pieces on snowfields or ice lakes is better than elsewhere.

The black bits of charcoal looking material standout from their surroundings.

Durn arctic. They get all the good stuff up there.
edit on 18-11-2017 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: Z32Driver



Extremely important issue to face as a species IMO...


Very true, that is one of the main reasons I think we need to colonize Mars and other planets. It is just a matter of time till a big one takes us out, just like it did the dinosaurs.


edit on 18-11-2017 by LookingAtMars because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:22 PM
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originally posted by: LookingAtMars

Sure seems like a lot of fireballs lately. ...


Or...

Video cameras have become so ubiquitous (web cams, security cams, dashboard cams, people carrying video cameras phones in their pockets) that it is now more likely that a fireball will end up on video for the world to see.

Add to that the use of the internet, social media, and message boards as a venue for those videos to get distributed to virtually everyone.

It could be that 30 years ago there were just as many fireball meteors as there are today, but if they were not caught on video, and the reports of those event did not go much further than the local news (if that), then the rest of the world would not have been aware of all of them like they are now.



edit on 18/11/2017 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Thanks for that video in the CBS link you provided. According to one definition,


However, the term generally applies to fireballs reaching an apparent magnitude −14 or brighter. Astronomers tend to use bolide to identify an exceptionally bright fireball, particularly one that explodes (sometimes called a detonating fireball). It may also be used to mean a fireball that is audible.

From the OP...


It produced a blast wave that felt like an explosion about 6:40 p.m.

---

It might have weighed about 220 pounds, according to Nikolai Kruglikov of Yekaterinburg’s Urals Federal University.

Race is on...
edit on 18-11-2017 by intrptr because: spelling



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

They are also much brighter at night. Case in point...



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

You have a point and look at the moon, there was a time when there were a lot more than now



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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This happened a couple of days ago in Phoenix, Arizona.

www.azcentral.com...

Seems like there is more activity lately. Or maybe we have more devices watching. I just hope that they are all small ones!!




posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
Race is on...

Funny enough when you say that, right now It's more like a race between differing shower 'groups'.

Orionids - Sep 23 Nov 27
Southern Taurids - Sep 23 Nov 19
Northern Taurids - Oct 19 Dec 10
Leonids - Nov 5 30

All are current!

Interestingly, back a while, looking at the skies for shooting stars was a busy enough pastime,

"The Leonids are best known for producing great meteor storms in the years of 1833, 1866, 1966, and 2001. These outbursts of meteor activity are best seen when the parent object, comet 55P/Tempel-Tuttle, is near.............



www.amsmeteors.org...
edit on 18-11-2017 by smurfy because: Text-link.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 01:09 PM
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More Video



More Info


edit on 18-11-2017 by LookingAtMars because: Fix and Add



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 01:27 PM
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I hope I will see another fireball before I die. I saw one about thirty years ago that was impressive.

Back then, before there was the internet, people thought I was seeing things when I said something about it. It was in the newspaper about three days later, a little article nobody probably saw.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 03:46 PM
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Probably just the end of the world.


Conspiracy theorists are claiming that a rogue planet will disrupt Earth’s orbit this Sunday and bring about a series of catastrophic earthquakes that could decimate life as we know it.


www.foxnews.com...




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