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country ham with cracklins on the side... what up

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posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 06:56 AM
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boom



this # is so good. my boss just got back from tennessee and brought me back a brick of this country ham. i had a piece last year and have been frothing ever since. this # is legit. not sure if country ham is the actual name but that is what he calls it. after i had that piece i bought a 'country ham' from a meat market around here and it was not the same.

this thing is cured for 7 months then smoked. they cure it in a feed bag apparently the same way they have been doing it for 200 years. this stuff is too good. smokey and salty but not too much of either. a nice amount of fat. good color. just fantastic.

the cracklins are legit too. huge pieces.

the meat is almost purple or plum color. it has that tint to it.

just wantd to share with my fellow foodies....

big fat furry man where you at?




posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 06:58 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears


That's a breakfast/lunch/dinner/snack kind of foodstuff and kills anything you get at the store.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: TinySickTears


That's a breakfast/lunch/dinner/snack kind of foodstuff and kills anything you get at the store.


i knew you would appreciate it too.

i cant even explain how good this is and how much flavor it has.
far superior that anything else i can get.

it is smoked and cured so you can smash right out of the fridge. in a skillet for a minute or so per side to crisp the edges.
christ man...
this is good eating.

i have 2 nice fatty chunks i am saving plus all the little circular bones to make a stock for greens.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:04 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears


I order one out of Virginia each year, they sell out ahead of time so you can re-up and place your order for the following year and stay off the wait list. I love this with some eggs and fresh biscuits for breakfast. Makes a great sandwich on thick cut bread with a little coarse mustard for lunch. I could eat ham like this daily and not get tired.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:08 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
Makes a great sandwich on thick cut bread with a little coarse mustard for lunch. I could eat ham like this daily and not get tired.


thats whats happening today.
took a day off work to go do christmas #. while out i am hitting up world market to get this mustard i like. dont know the brand but it is from germany. comes in a very small glass stein looking thing.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Country ham is a curing method. And its really good.

Im brining a picnic roast this weekend for an 8 day period., then smoking and hanging it for christmas. Home cured ham is easy and totally worth it.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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A couple lawn chairs settin in the garage lookin out, some Pineapple shine, some slivers of this ham...................come go witme....



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:22 AM
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When I lived in Morganfield in Western Ky, I always bought hams from Meacham's Farm. You'd have to try to believe.

They closed at the beginning of 2017 after 84 years in business.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:22 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: TinySickTears

Country ham is a curing method. And its really good.

Im brining a picnic roast this weekend for an 8 day period., then smoking and hanging it for christmas. Home cured ham is easy and totally worth it.

I make picnic hams all the time. I've posted pics before. That # is banging too



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:40 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Düsseldorf Mustard. Geez, I might be experiencing Ham Envy....looks good.



edit on 17-11-2017 by Newt22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 07:57 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: TinySickTears


That's a breakfast/lunch/dinner/snack kind of foodstuff and kills anything you get at the store.


i knew you would appreciate it too.

i cant even explain how good this is and how much flavor it has.
far superior that anything else i can get.

it is smoked and cured so you can smash right out of the fridge. in a skillet for a minute or so per side to crisp the edges.
christ man...
this is good eating.

i have 2 nice fatty chunks i am saving plus all the little circular bones to make a stock for greens.

Country cured ham is usually not cooked in processing. They are typically dry-cured and smoked.
Unless the product is labeled as 'fully cooked, ready to eat' , you should cook it.
Although trichinosis is rare in the US, it still does occur.
The Meat Man
edit on b000000302017-11-17T07:59:24-06:0007America/ChicagoFri, 17 Nov 2017 07:59:24 -0600700000017 by butcherguy because: Moved comma.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 08:04 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Interesting. I thought it was good to go



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 08:06 AM
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originally posted by: Newt22
a reply to: TinySickTears

Düsseldorf Mustard. Geez, I might be experiencing Ham Envy....looks good.




I think so. Has a blue top. Super good mustard. Just got to the store for my bread



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 08:16 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: butcherguy

Interesting. I thought it was good to go

Probably very low risk....and what is life without some risk? Boring and tasteless.
The country cured hams are less salty in the center slices due to the dry cure process. Country ham is hard to beat with eggs in the morning!
Corn bread is really great if you crumble up some cracklins into the batter and stir it in before you bake it.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears Dude wth, I have to wait a week for my family get together and the sad part is I have to cater to there needs. Part Jewish and part catholic, yes very weird but it is what it is. I usually broil all my meats with bacon grease but NO. Btw that looks soooooo good


edit on 2/19/2013 by Allaroundyou because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 09:46 AM
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originally posted by: TinySickTears
boom



this # is so good. my boss just got back from tennessee and brought me back a brick of this country ham. i had a piece last year and have been frothing ever since. this # is legit. not sure if country ham is the actual name but that is what he calls it. after i had that piece i bought a 'country ham' from a meat market around here and it was not the same.

this thing is cured for 7 months then smoked. they cure it in a feed bag apparently the same way they have been doing it for 200 years. this stuff is too good. smokey and salty but not too much of either. a nice amount of fat. good color. just fantastic.

the cracklins are legit too. huge pieces.

the meat is almost purple or plum color. it has that tint to it.

just wantd to share with my fellow foodies....

big fat furry man where you at?


Ain't nothing like country cooking... I'm getting hungry just looking at that picture.

Bizarre Foods did an episode recently where the featured some guy in Kentucky I believe smoking hams in pillow cases in his garage. Apparently he supplies Chefs all over the country.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:13 AM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

What are cracklins?



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:15 AM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
a reply to: TinySickTears

What are cracklins?


Fried pork skin...



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
a reply to: TinySickTears

What are cracklins?


Chicharron!!!



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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Where I grew up in rural Pennsylvania, cracklins were the remains after the lard was processed.

The skins were not included. The fat from the back of the hog was removed and the skin was taken off. The fat was chopped into approximately 3/4'' cubes and rendered in a kettle. After the chunks of fat floated to the top and became golden brown, they were removed and strained through a lard press. After pressing out the liquid fat, the cake of cracklins was what remained in the press.
We usually ate them hot out of the press with a little salt on them.



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