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New Mandela Effect?

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posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:16 PM
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The other day I noticed a friend posting Bible verses on social media. One really got my attention and shocked me... Luke 14:26.

"If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot."

"Yea" pretty odd, right?

The friend who posted it was explaining that it meant to "put God first". I was raised Catholic and never have I heard of Jesus preaching hate. I could think of a better way to paraphrase this verse void of negative misinterpretation but why was is it written this way?

I thought about this verse for a few days and a book I read came to mind, Infernal Angel by Edward Lee, where Satan plans to create an evil clone of Christ to go back in time to ruin the creation of Christianity; destroying the Bible without burning it.

Did the Bible change? Perhaps this verse is simply overlooked and ignored or it's a new Mandela Effect.

What do you think?
edit on 16-11-2017 by Oddba1l because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:22 PM
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ATS needs a designated Mandela effect forum .

Put all you Mandela folks in one area 🤣



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

The word "hate" has always been in the KLV. I would put it down to you being Catholic. Catholics aren't encouraged to do their own thinking.

As for Satan going back in time? Satan has had the last few thousand years to do that. Whats so special about 2017?



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:29 PM
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honestly, i don't believe in the mandela effect in the first place -- but if you never even heard the verse before and are just surprised it exists, i don't think this even qualifies as a mandela effect.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:41 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

Raised Catholic, not one anymore.

Satan going back in time is a pretty rad concept for a book hence the mention



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:44 PM
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Dude, it's always been "Life WAS like a box of chocolates"



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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What's a, 'the Bible'?

That's what I want to know..



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:57 PM
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Also, I have known about this verse for at least five years now.

My opinion is there is no Mandela Effect.

edit on 11-16-2017 by WakeUpBeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

Lost in Translation.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

I remember the verse that way. Taken by itself, it may appear a bit if a downer. In the context of Luke 14, it makes more sense. Jesus telling the crowds following him about the cost and sacrifice one must be willing to make to become a disciple.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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originally posted by: Oddba1l
I thought about this verse for a few days and a book I read came to mind, Infernal Angel by Edward Lee, where Satan plans to create an evil clone of Christ to go back in time to ruin the creation of Christianity; destroying the Bible without burning it.


Strange because I've always lived in a timeline where christians are assholes and the bible is a heap of crap. Maybe we are from different timelines.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: Oddba1l
The other day I noticed a friend posting Bible verses on social media. One really got my attention and shocked me... Luke 14:26.

"If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot."

"Yea" pretty odd, right?

The friend who posted it was explaining that it meant to "put God first". I was raised Catholic and never have I heard of Jesus preaching hate. I could think of a better way to paraphrase this verse void of negative misinterpretation but why was is it written this way?

I thought about this verse for a few days and a book I read came to mind, Infernal Angel by Edward Lee, where Satan plans to create an evil clone of Christ to go back in time to ruin the creation of Christianity; destroying the Bible without burning it.

Did the Bible change? Perhaps this verse is simply overlooked and ignored or it's a new Mandela Effect.

What do you think?


For the Greek verb miseo, the word “hate” is a misleading translation. As used here, the verb means, “to regard with less affection,” “to love less,” “to esteem less.” Here, Our Lord is simply telling us that He must come first in our love and commitment. We truly love and serve Him only if He is the most important person in our life. On another occasion, Jesus spoke the same truth, but more plainly: “Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me” (Mt 10:37).

www.osv.com...



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

It's no "Mandela Effect". It's been there the whole time. Here are 10 of the 25 or so translations listed on Biblehub.com (the link lists them all):


New International Version
"If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters--yes, even their own life--such a person cannot be my disciple.

New Living Translation
"If you want to be my disciple, you must hate everyone else by comparison--your father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters--yes, even your own life. Otherwise, you cannot be my disciple.

English Standard Version
“If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple.

Berean Study Bible
"If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters--yes, even his own life--he cannot be My disciple.

Berean Literal Bible
"If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters and yes, even his life, he is not able to be My disciple.

New American Standard Bible
"If anyone comes to Me, and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be My disciple.

King James Bible
If any man come to me, and hate not his father, and mother, and wife, and children, and brethren, and sisters, yea, and his own life also, he cannot be my disciple.

Holman Christian Standard Bible
"If anyone comes to Me and does not hate his own father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters--yes, and even his own life--he cannot be My disciple.

International Standard Version
"If anyone comes to me and does not hate his father, mother, wife, children, brothers, and sisters, as well as his own life, he can't be my disciple.

NET Bible
"If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother, and wife and children, and brothers and sisters, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple.

biblehub.com...

It's better to read it all yourself. If you make it through to 14:33, it implies that it was a metaphoric example that backs up what your friend says.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Yeah, I understand but why use the word "hate" instead of just saying what it's supposed to mean?



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:14 PM
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originally posted by: infolurker

For the Greek verb miseo, the word “hate” is a misleading translation. As used here, the verb means, “to regard with less affection,” “to love less,” “to esteem less.” Here, Our Lord is simply telling us that He must come first in our love and commitment. We truly love and serve Him only if He is the most important person in our life. On another occasion, Jesus spoke the same truth, but more plainly: “Whoever loves father or mother more than me is not worthy of me, and whoever loves son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me” (Mt 10:37).

www.osv.com...


To love those I love and to also love myself less? Sounds like a jealous God. Hate and jealousy are petty human emotions for a supreme being, just my opinion



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:16 PM
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originally posted by: GusMcDangerthing

originally posted by: Oddba1l
I thought about this verse for a few days and a book I read came to mind, Infernal Angel by Edward Lee, where Satan plans to create an evil clone of Christ to go back in time to ruin the creation of Christianity; destroying the Bible without burning it.


Strange because I've always lived in a timeline where christians are assholes and the bible is a heap of crap. Maybe we are from different timelines.


Nah, we're in the same timeline, your comment made me laugh



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: dffrntkndfnml
a reply to: Oddba1l

I remember the verse that way. Taken by itself, it may appear a bit if a downer. In the context of Luke 14, it makes more sense. Jesus telling the crowds following him about the cost and sacrifice one must be willing to make to become a disciple.


I can't picture Jesus actually using that word or even using "miseo" to his disciples.
Maybe "hate" was taken out of context? Lol



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: fiverx313

Your reply brings to mind Luke 19:27. Out of the biblical verses often raised when it comes to the ME, imo this one at the end of the parable of ten minas fits the bill.


But those mine enemies, which would not that I should reign over them, bring hither, and slay [them] before me.

I couldn't recall the verse, makes me wonder if others remember this as the end of that parable. Idk, if this qualifies though. I found it a little surprising not being able to remember it, especially in the light of some of my more zealous times past...

a reply to: Oddba1l

Lol, could be.Actually miseo and infolurker's post lead me to wonder how it's pronounced?Hmm, maybe I'll come back to that.

Idk, I get the feeling that if someone hates something they still care.Indifference or apathy seems more cold to me.Thinking about one's spiritual journey, I feel there comes a time when individuals will question the value of hate, and hopefully learn to let go...
edit on 16-11-2017 by dffrntkndfnml because: inb4 double post



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 12:11 AM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

In context, Jesus is saying you must hate the worldly things and live spiritually in love. Jesus will speak in parables that worldly people cannot understand. Once you choose to follow him, these things are revealed.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: Oddba1l

But it does say what it's supposed to mean afterwards. People need to stop taking single sentences from books and treating them like they should stand on their own, especially when that single sentence is part of a multi-paragraph lecture.

If you read the actual passages, a crowd was following him so he turned around and lectured them. The lecture included several other examples before showing how those examples related to his main point, which was that you need to be prepared 100% before following him.

No offense, but it's been there from the very beginning. So if you or someone else is surprised by it, then isn't that on you for not reading it for yourself? I'm not trying to be mean here but people should really stop taking other people's word on what is in religious books. Just read them for yourselves and then form your own conclusions.

If people are trying to promote the image that he never said "hate", was strictly a super hippie that kissed butterflies & hugged trees, or never had any emotions, then that's on them for misrepresenting what's actually been in the books from the beginning. But don't blame him or act disillusioned because you believed someone else's misrepresentation without double checking for yourself.



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