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Airliners And F-15s Involved In Bizarre Encounter With Mystery Aircraft Over Oregon

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posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

There are several three letter agencies that use operational assets that don't play by the same rules that everyone on outside do. The less people that are aware of what they are doing the less leaks they have and the easier it is to cover their tracks. This is why we never hear about some of these transit flights till they are caught on camera, crash or accidentally take out LAX ATC.

As a side note, it could be just coincidental but the shortest route from the SW US to North Korea crosses the Oregon/Cali border.
edit on 16-11-2017 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Forensick

If it was a test. If the aircraft was returning for whatever reason they're not going to tell anyone, and there are times I can see them not talking to ATC. It wouldn't be the first time they've ignored rules and done something.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Forensick

The less people that are aware of what they are doing the less leaks they have and the easier it is to cover their tracks.


My thoughts exactly. No reason to tell that interceptor squadron what you're doing. Need to know only. If they get scrambled and can't find you, so what they wasted some fuel? Better than adding people to the information pool, increasing the chance of a leak.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:12 PM
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originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Forensick

The less people that are aware of what they are doing the less leaks they have and the easier it is to cover their tracks.


My thoughts exactly. No reason to tell that interceptor squadron what you're doing. Need to know only. If they get scrambled and can't find you, so what they wasted some fuel? Better than adding people to the information pool, increasing the chance of a leak.


plus good test of their training, could even be planned to see what response they get, kinda like that missile they launched down near san diego a few years ago



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 08:03 AM
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Somebody earlier mentioned the object was flying straight but what do we make of this snippet taken from the story in the link below.

..The time of day made it hard. All the guys on the east side couldn’t see it due to the setting sun and the North bound traffic on the west side was pretty sparse. I guess ZOA [Oakland Center] had a good primary/mode C on the guy for a bit in the RBL [Red Bluff Municipal Airport] area. It was initially heading SW and it made a pretty sharp turn to the North. Way harder/faster than what a commercial aircraft could handle at that speed/altitude without ripping the wings off."

the drive.com
edit on 17/11/17 by macpdm because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: macpdm
Somebody earlier mentioned the object was flying straight but what do we make of this snippet taken from the story in the link below.

..The time of day made it hard. All the guys on the east side couldn’t see it due to the setting sun and the North bound traffic on the west side was pretty sparse. I guess ZOA [Oakland Center] had a good primary/mode C on the guy for a bit in the RBL [Red Bluff Municipal Airport] area. It was initially heading SW and it made a pretty sharp turn to the North. Way harder/faster than what a commercial aircraft could handle at that speed/altitude without ripping the wings off."

the drive.com


I think what we make of that is it wasn't a commercial airliner, which we were pretty sure of already.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 09:06 AM
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If it were a test, why would they fly out over Oregon, as opposed to Nevada, California, or Utah?



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 01:53 PM
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originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?
edit on 18-11-2017 by MAVERICKANDGOOSE because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: MAVERICKANDGOOSE

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?


I don't think we have enough information. It merely says the turn didn't appear to be something a commercial airliner could do. To me that leaves open the possibility it was simply another airframe that could withstand such a turn. And is the person who posted that qualified to determine a commercial airliner couldn't have done it in the first place?



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: FredT

This wasn't day time. It was early evening at least. The pilots are saying "good evening"and "good night". This might have been right at sunset, but it wasn't day time.


Pretty sure I heard an air patrol launch from Portland last month right around nightfall. It seemed very unusual at the time because they usually launch right around noon..



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: MAVERICKANDGOOSE

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?


I don't think we have enough information. It merely says the turn didn't appear to be something a commercial airliner could do. To me that leaves open the possibility it was simply another airframe that could withstand such a turn. And is the person who posted that qualified to determine a commercial airliner couldn't have done it in the first place?


In the US, there are people with money to burn. Take the Alpha Jet for instance. Quite silly for a private jet, but plenty are in private hands.

But I go back to my original post in that the plane had to take off from some airport and transition to higher altitudes, so it really isn't a mystery. Someone knows something.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 08:17 AM
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originally posted by: clay2 baraka

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: FredT

This wasn't day time. It was early evening at least. The pilots are saying "good evening"and "good night". This might have been right at sunset, but it wasn't day time.


Pretty sure I heard an air patrol launch from Portland last month right around nightfall. It seemed very unusual at the time because they usually launch right around noon..


Gotta get some night flying hours in sometimes.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: gariac

originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: MAVERICKANDGOOSE

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?


I don't think we have enough information. It merely says the turn didn't appear to be something a commercial airliner could do. To me that leaves open the possibility it was simply another airframe that could withstand such a turn. And is the person who posted that qualified to determine a commercial airliner couldn't have done it in the first place?


In the US, there are people with money to burn. Take the Alpha Jet for instance. Quite silly for a private jet, but plenty are in private hands.

But I go back to my original post in that the plane had to take off from some airport and transition to higher altitudes, so it really isn't a mystery. Someone knows something.


Of course. I don't think anyone here is of the opinion that the plane appeared out of thin air.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 12:15 AM
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originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: gariac

originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: MAVERICKANDGOOSE

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?


I don't think we have enough information. It merely says the turn didn't appear to be something a commercial airliner could do. To me that leaves open the possibility it was simply another airframe that could withstand such a turn. And is the person who posted that qualified to determine a commercial airliner couldn't have done it in the first place?


In the US, there are people with money to burn. Take the Alpha Jet for instance. Quite silly for a private jet, but plenty are in private hands.

But I go back to my original post in that the plane had to take off from some airport and transition to higher altitudes, so it really isn't a mystery. Someone knows something.


Of course. I don't think anyone here is of the opinion that the plane appeared out of thin air.


11.20.2017

Tucker Carlson discussed this incident with a military/aviation expert tonight. Jump to the 37min12sec mark to watch this brief segment.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

Tucker said it was a true story. So what was the first 37 minutes of the show. ;-)

I doubt the UAV going rogue theory. At least CONUS. The USAF would have used the fight termination signal before it got far off the range.

This leaves us with the problem of the F-15s not being able to intercept it. Or they call off the intercept once they realize it is a test aircraft.

I'm assuming the FAA radar has no holes in coverage for high flying aircraft.

Since we all agree the plane wasn't born at high altitude, some part of the FAA isn't providing data that would clear this up. Unless the plane was never under FAA control.



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: carewemust

I saw it. I rarely watch his show because he's just too much for me, but I happened to have it on last night. Pretty cool that it got (sorta) mainstream news coverage. I didn't really buy the UAV theory either. They did say the primary radar contact was intermittent, so maybe that explains why FAA can't figure out where it came from?



posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 08:02 AM
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originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: gariac

originally posted by: face23785

originally posted by: MAVERICKANDGOOSE

originally posted by: gariac
a reply to: face23785

No shortage of private jets these days. Gulfstream are fast and fly high.
perhaps... but can a gulfstream make/survive a turn as described in face23785’s post?


I don't think we have enough information. It merely says the turn didn't appear to be something a commercial airliner could do. To me that leaves open the possibility it was simply another airframe that could withstand such a turn. And is the person who posted that qualified to determine a commercial airliner couldn't have done it in the first place?


In the US, there are people with money to burn. Take the Alpha Jet for instance. Quite silly for a private jet, but plenty are in private hands.

But I go back to my original post in that the plane had to take off from some airport and transition to higher altitudes, so it really isn't a mystery. Someone knows something.


Of course. I don't think anyone here is of the opinion that the plane appeared out of thin air.


11.20.2017

Tucker Carlson discussed this incident with a military/aviation expert tonight. Jump to the 37min12sec mark to watch this brief segment.



I saw that also. Pretty funny.

They just wouldn't say alien spaceship. LOl.

You could see they wanted to say something like that.

Glad you posted this, I couldn't remember which show I saw it on.




posted on Nov, 21 2017 @ 05:21 PM
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You can FOIA radar data. I came across some on a government website. They upload the data for everyone to see rather than just return it to the person who did the request. That said, I never really understood how a few BRA data points comprised a radar return. You get a three letter designation of the radar site.

I still think we are mushrooms being fed fecal matter.




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