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New Gun Law in Wisconsin

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posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: ZeroFurrbone

My son got his first rifle at 8.

He went through a class at the range we used to go to and had more gun safety knowledge at 8 than many idiot adults.




posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:03 PM
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Got my first shotgun at age 9, was hunting with it by age 10.

If properly trained and educated on the gun a lot of kids are perfectly safe around guns, and understand them much better than many adults.

Not sure if it would be considered good now a days, but my dad took me to an outdoor range and set up a watermelon to shoot at, asked me if I loved my sister I said yes, he told me to shoot the melon. I did, afterwards he gave me a long talk about how if I am playing with the gun that could have been my sister (paraphrase that was a long bloody time ago).

Now I am about to be 45 and have never put my finger on a trigger unless I was certain of my target and the space behind the target.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:05 PM
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originally posted by: JBurns
a reply to: Cygnis


Agreed, I have no idea what exactly changed in society in that time either. But the public at large is an entirely different animal (to use a phrase, not literally saying they're animals) than it was 20-30 years ago


I think a general lack of respect for others (including their lives) and a lower standard of parenting is part of the problem. But even that doesn't really explain anything.

Crazy times, my friend!


Agreed.

A lot of that has to do with it, and at that same time parents were also discovering that both had to work to make ends meet.

Times are a changing, constantly.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey


All kinds of great points made here, especially the numbered points.

Hunting is an extremely useful skill, as not everyone wants to rely on grocery stores and civilization for something crucial like food. I'm no grizzly adams, and god knows I love my daily brew from (gasp) Starbucks (hey, I like their coffee not their politics
) But if push ever came to shove, I could go out and get my own food and I know my family could too if I wasn't here for them.

I think hunting is an excellent way to teach children the value of life, gun safety and how to feed yourself without society's help (in case of disaster/collapse, for instance). I think everyone gets that sick feeling (that one that doesn't go away for days) the first time they kill an animal on a hunt. I know I did. It may not make much sense, but that feeling teaches us a lot about the value of human life and how precious really every life is - including animals. For instance deer I've killed during a hunt do not go to waste - the meat is eaten/frozen, the fur is used for blankets/throws and the antlers are kept for toolmaking. Even fats from certain animals can be properly collected and cured (not sure if that is the right term).

Now I believe God put animals/plants on Earth to sustain people, which is why I think it is all that much more important to be reverent of the animal's life which is providing your food/warmth/tools etc.

Just my two cents, I'm sure plenty will disagree
edit on 11/15/2017 by JBurns because: Spelling errors... thanks mobile device platform
(crappy cellphone)



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:06 PM
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originally posted by: ZeroFurrbone
I never understood hunting or shooting living things for fun, and really despise how some parents want to teach their kids to kill, but there at least should be some age limit so the kids to actually understand what they are doing.


So since everything comes from the grocery store, we don't need to teach kids how to hunt, live off the land and not be squeamish about blood and guts.

There is nothing like building fire by the river and cooking the catch or a piece of the kill over the fire. And sausage just tastes better just ground, mixed and cooked on wood stove while butchering hogs.

I may not be able to tromp though the woods anymore but I'll never forget the good times when I could tag along with father and brothers; finally becoming old enough to go alone.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:07 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: Lurker1
Kids in the age range cited should not be handling firearms.


My 9 year old daughter will outshoot you with a rimfire rifle with both iron sights and a scope and will smoke your ass with a bow.


And this nine year old girl killed the shooting instructor.


Just saying.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: Bramble Iceshimmer

You are making me quite hungry, thank you




posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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I will never forget hunting in the rockies with my dad, week on the mtn, couple days in the cabin before going back up the mtn for another week.

Fresh caught trout, steak, eggs for breakfast at the cabin, or being up near the tree line sitting in a mtn glade looking out over the mtns as we ate lunch.

It amazes me that people do not want that experience.
edit on 15-11-2017 by Irishhaf because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: JBurns

Not too different from the American Indians.

They had the same respect and used all of the animal for their needs and nothing went to waste.

I agree with that as well.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: soberbacchus


Which is what happens when you stand in an unsafe location next to a child that has never fired an automatic weapon before. SMGs are notoriously difficult to control if you aren't expecting the muzzle rise - especially for likely first time shooters.

But of course, we aren't talking about automatic weapons here are we sober? We're discussing hunting weapons, and I believe the post you referenced was speaking of a .22 lr. specifically. One is a light rimfire cartridge in a rifle (no recoil) while the other is a centerfire duty caliber (9x19) in an automatic SMG platform (moderate recoil).
edit on 11/15/2017 by JBurns because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: ZeroFurrbone

I started shooting when I was 10 I knew exactly what I was doing.

Jaden



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: soberbacchus

originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: Lurker1
Kids in the age range cited should not be handling firearms.


My 9 year old daughter will outshoot you with a rimfire rifle with both iron sights and a scope and will smoke your ass with a bow.


And this nine year old girl killed the shooting instructor.


Just saying.


OMG!!! I'm going to stop taking my daughter to the range immediately after seeing that! (NOT)

Every kid is different. My 9 year old is ice water when we're at the range. She's been shooting for just over 2 years, thousands of rounds down the range, not a single incident. Part of the problem in that video is that you don't give a fully loaded selective fire pistol to a kid for their first lesson. I am a firm believer in the value of single shot firearms when training kids.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: soberbacchus

originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: Lurker1
Kids in the age range cited should not be handling firearms.


My 9 year old daughter will outshoot you with a rimfire rifle with both iron sights and a scope and will smoke your ass with a bow.


And this nine year old girl killed the shooting instructor.


Just saying.


OMG!!! I'm going to stop taking my daughter to the range immediately after seeing that! (NOT)

Every kid is different. My 9 year old is ice water when we're at the range. She's been shooting for just over 2 years, thousands of rounds down the range, not a single incident. Part of the problem in that video is that you don't give a fully loaded selective fire pistol to a kid for their first lesson. I am a firm believer in the value of single shot firearms when training kids.


This^

Giving new shooters a select fire SMG is never going to end well

I always personally found it helpful to start them out slow, loading up a single round into the weapon and letting them fire it. That way if they panic and drop it, or turn holding the gun and flag someone w/ the barrel (after firing the round of course) in order to avoid a dangerous situation. After they got used to the way a specific weapon handled, they were golden with it!

I love hearing all the people who take their kids hunting/shooting/to the range



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:30 PM
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My grandfather went hunting from about that age, with his father--and I'm sure it was the same as far back as you might care to go. When he became a father, all his sons went with him hunting. My Dad took me, and my brother, with him. I was five the first time. I've been shooting since I was five, as well.

...and I, in my turn, took my nieces and nephews hunting when they were not much older than that.

I'm not sure why anyone would think this unusual? It's a right of passage, in many ways. I was seldom closer to my father and uncles, even grand dad, when after a long day of hunting those elusive deer or elk, we'd sit around the camp fire/or stove in my Uncles canvas hunting cabin, and I'd listen to tales of hunts past, and eventually sharing my own tales of hunting in Alaska before my Dad passed. These tales are now shared with my nieces, and their kids. Though their kids are more inclined to video games than hunting...but there are other kids that I've introduced to life in the woods and mountains.

Watching childrens eyes light up while watching a summer thunder storm. Showing them the differences between a mule deer, and the more familiar, to them, white tail. Or where a bear has slept, and where that same bear sat and ate some huckleberries.

There's not a better way to teach a child respect for the world around them, then to take them out into the woods, and fields. Hunting, or just watching.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: JBurns
a reply to: SlapMonkey


All kinds of great points made here, especially the numbered points.[/quotes]
Thanks.


I think hunting is an excellent way to teach children the value of life, gun safety and how to feed yourself without society's help (in case of disaster/collapse, for instance).

Agreed...but you forgot that it's also a great way to teach children how we have to pay for the government's permission to do things which should be a natural right, as well.

Sorry, I just think that hunting/fishing licenses are absurd to me, and it really explains how far our culture has come from being able to and understanding the need to provide for one's self--when we have to ask the government's permission and pay them in order to do it (without threat of arrest).



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: soberbacchus

Well, that's a lesson learned!! No more automatic weapons, or semi-auto for nine year old kids. Not sure what you're attempting to prove here...but continue on.

I was taught with an old single shot .22, graduated to a single shot .30-30 (nasty kicking piece of...). Learned the same way to shoot a shotgun. To this day, I don't hunt birds with anything more than my trusty single shot 12 gauge, or my Dad's double.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: seagull



Watching childrens eyes light up while watching a summer thunder storm. Showing them the differences between a mule deer, and the more familiar, to them, white tail. Or where a bear has slept, and where that same bear sat and ate some huckleberries.

There's not a better way to teach a child respect for the world around them, then to take them out into the woods, and fields. Hunting, or just watching.


Talk about bringing back some amazing memories

Thanks for that trip down memory lane, sincerely



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: soberbacchus
And this nine year old girl killed the shooting instructor.

...

Just saying.

No, you're just cherry-picking, which is a logical fallacy. There are also grown adults who have accidentally killed people at the range as well.

Accidents happen. So do logical fallacies, apparently.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

I know, right?

Three summers ago, I took a group of my friends kids out on a weeklong camping trip. Up in the Bitterroots in Idaho.

Made 'em leave their cell phones at home. I had one, but strictly just in case...there was no coverage.


The first night out, a thunderstorm rolled in, lightning and thunder, a bit of rain, I was out watching it. I turned around and all four kids were watching it from their tents. I don't think any of them had actually been out in nature, and seen a storm. The wonder was something I'll cherish forever. Taught them to make fishing poles and lines, and hooks, and we had trout for breakfast more often than not, that week.

Not once did I hear a complaint about not having their phones.

Too many children have lost that connection with nature, and I find it sad.



posted on Nov, 15 2017 @ 02:43 PM
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I think its a brilliant idea. allow someone you wouldn't trust to cross a busy intersection by themselves to be able to purchase a rifle. i can't wait for hunting season in a few months to hear 0 of the tragic news that will come of this.
it's about time we came to our senses.
i foresee nothing ever going wrong stemming from this new law.

i say lower it to 5 years old . its their constitutional rights.




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