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'Transracial' man born white feels like he is Filipino/NAACP Fires women for ID'ing as white...

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posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

He used to be a he, he now identifies as a she, and she also identifies as a Filipino.

Double trans.




posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

Well we should let him go there and have a closed door one on one talk with Duterte. If he lives, he's Filipino, if not then I guess he didn't pass the test .

Let's see what he identifies as then.



posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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Southpark is always ahead of the game.....LOL





edit on 14-11-2017 by GuidedKill because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: Cutepants

I would definitely say they are different situations. However, how much of what a female or male "is," is defined by culture?

Clearly, there are physical differences, but those are essentially removed as determining factors by advocates. Now, what happens when neurology, etc. are examined? Well, the structures that would result in "being a man," or "being a woman" would inevitably be attributed and defined according to cultural norms. What happens when what it means to be a man or woman inevitably changes over time?

Lets take a hypothetical culture that makes absolutely no differentiation between male and female beyond physicality. Would the science of this culture attribute specific brain structures to gender recognition, or something else entirely? Even if concepts like femininity and masculinity were used, would they be assigned to gender at all? Or, more along the lines of the different structures that illustrate increased creativity, or decreased spatial awareness?

I don't think we have much, if any answers either. The issue I have is that conclusions are driven by narratives and standing expectations. Which, in my opinion, is a more widespread problem than just this topic. It may be the case that gender reassignment surgery is more a result of cultural expectations than any sort of actual treatment. In that case, it would be more a matter of surgically matching neurology with culture, rather than matching neurology with what the individual "really is."

Beyond all that, I'm not sure that many (if not most) understand how deeply and profoundly culture defines our experience. There is a shallow acceptance of the concept, but from what I have seen, not much comprehension and understanding of what that really means.

For the handful of people (if that many!) that might read my posts, its seen that I frequently harp on about our Cultural Story. I really do feel it is at the core of many, many issues from social to economic, and that includes this one. My personal concern is that, if it is true, literally none of our current approaches will be effective..

Thank you for the thoughtful reply



posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

You do realize that this guy is probably tuning himself up for a Presidential run on the Democrat ticket!

He's................perfect! His running mate could be Ru Paul.



posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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Oh what great times we live in! i've always wanted to come out as a lesbian! even though i've been male for 55 years! i just thought it would be fun to be a lesbian! my girlfriend doesn't believe i could pull it off! (pun intended) for obvious reasons lol



posted on Nov, 14 2017 @ 04:10 PM
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originally posted by: Serdgiam
a reply to: Cutepants

I would definitely say they are different situations. However, how much of what a female or male "is," is defined by culture?

Clearly, there are physical differences, but those are essentially removed as determining factors by advocates. Now, what happens when neurology, etc. are examined? Well, the structures that would result in "being a man," or "being a woman" would inevitably be attributed and defined according to cultural norms. What happens when what it means to be a man or woman inevitably changes over time?

Lets take a hypothetical culture that makes absolutely no differentiation between male and female beyond physicality. Would the science of this culture attribute specific brain structures to gender recognition, or something else entirely? Even if concepts like femininity and masculinity were used, would they be assigned to gender at all? Or, more along the lines of the different structures that illustrate increased creativity, or decreased spatial awareness?

I don't think we have much, if any answers either. The issue I have is that conclusions are driven by narratives and standing expectations. Which, in my opinion, is a more widespread problem than just this topic. It may be the case that gender reassignment surgery is more a result of cultural expectations than any sort of actual treatment. In that case, it would be more a matter of surgically matching neurology with culture, rather than matching neurology with what the individual "really is."

Beyond all that, I'm not sure that many (if not most) understand how deeply and profoundly culture defines our experience. There is a shallow acceptance of the concept, but from what I have seen, not much comprehension and understanding of what that really means.

For the handful of people (if that many!) that might read my posts, its seen that I frequently harp on about our Cultural Story. I really do feel it is at the core of many, many issues from social to economic, and that includes this one. My personal concern is that, if it is true, literally none of our current approaches will be effective..

Thank you for the thoughtful reply


It turns into something like this:




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