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The Illusion of Confidence or: What Know-It-Alls Don't Know

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posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 08:16 PM
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originally posted by: Nothin

Dictionaries are static snapshots. Just facts in the moment.
Words, languages, expressions, and definitions are dynamic, and constantly evolving.

Can the same be said for our supposed knowledge?



a dictionary doesnt know how to toast bread. most people do. just saying.




posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 09:15 PM
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originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

The student tells the teacher: "YOU DON'T KNOW MORE THAN THE DICTIONARTY!"
Her response: "I bet I do! I am a VERY intelligent person".


Dictionartys don't know anything, do they?
I was actually waiting for this response. To which I have little to no reply.
Know anything?
I guess not but it has almost all the definitions there. So when you say you know a definition and you're wrong, either you're a delusional know-it-all or......well, a delusional know-it-all.


Dictionaries are static snapshots. Just facts in the moment.
Words, languages, expressions, and definitions are dynamic, and constantly evolving.




Yes and dictionaries are constantly evolving as well to keep up with shifting meanings of words.

Making up your own definitions for words is fine if you don't want to communicate with anyone else or communicate with only those that 'know your definitions'.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 09:25 PM
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Liquid courage?

Isnt it a chemical imbalance?



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: Quadrivium
I think most false confidence based on ignorance. If somebody knew how to achieve better skills and do a better job generally they would. Those who are less skilled but full of confidence don't see the little subtleties that seperate the exceptional from average. Above average people often have the vision of the best way to complete a task but are wise to know they lack the elite skills, and acknowledge there are people who are going to be exceptional at developing those high level things further. Over confident people just use their current skill set to the max and see little place for improvement, so they consider themselves very skilled.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: Quadrivium

Dunning - Kruger stole the idea from Aristotle.

“The more you know, the more you know you don't know.”



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:27 PM
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originally posted by: Quadrivium

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

The student tells the teacher: "YOU DON'T KNOW MORE THAN THE DICTIONARTY!"
Her response: "I bet I do! I am a VERY intelligent person".


Dictionartys don't know anything, do they?
I was actually waiting for this response. To which I have little to no reply.
Know anything?
I guess not but it has almost all the definitions there. So when you say you know a definition and you're wrong, either you're a delusional know-it-all or......well, a delusional know-it-all.


Dictionaries are static snapshots. Just facts in the moment.
Words, languages, expressions, and definitions are dynamic, and constantly evolving.

Can the same be said for our supposed knowledge?
Perhaps as soon as we think we know something, we freeze an idea in place.
But ideas are shared, and evolve, and so the thing we think we know, has morphed in another direction.

Thinking we know things, is like driving down a road, and burning the bridges behind us. We lose access to other tangential ideas, because we think we have the one and only true road.

Bless ignorance, deny knowledge.
ok. .... So you're smarter than a dictionary too?


Well: that wasn't the intent, to have you think that. Didn't the deny knowledge part kind of give it away?

Dictionaries are not smart. They are a limited set of concepts, frozen in time.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:32 PM
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originally posted by: choos

originally posted by: Nothin

Dictionaries are static snapshots. Just facts in the moment.
Words, languages, expressions, and definitions are dynamic, and constantly evolving.

Can the same be said for our supposed knowledge?



a dictionary doesnt know how to toast bread. most people do. just saying.


Yup: got me poor-old grandma's recipe for toast. Straight flat on the wood stove.
Dictionaries go inside the stove... (Just kidding).



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:35 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

originally posted by: Nothin

originally posted by: Quadrivium

The student tells the teacher: "YOU DON'T KNOW MORE THAN THE DICTIONARTY!"
Her response: "I bet I do! I am a VERY intelligent person".


Dictionartys don't know anything, do they?
I was actually waiting for this response. To which I have little to no reply.
Know anything?
I guess not but it has almost all the definitions there. So when you say you know a definition and you're wrong, either you're a delusional know-it-all or......well, a delusional know-it-all.


Dictionaries are static snapshots. Just facts in the moment.
Words, languages, expressions, and definitions are dynamic, and constantly evolving.




Yes and dictionaries are constantly evolving as well to keep up with shifting meanings of words.

Making up your own definitions for words is fine if you don't want to communicate with anyone else or communicate with only those that 'know your definitions'.


Yes: and that shows us that the dictionaries follow us, and not the other way around.
They are a tool. They are not absolute truth.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:36 PM
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I no all about the Dumbing-Cougar affection.
I outsource everyone, so therefore I'd no.
My sores are always in the top present.

Star my post for being write.
I wind.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:40 PM
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Oh....
yall were being serious?

That's truly ironic.



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 02:46 AM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom
a reply to: Quadrivium

Dunning - Kruger stole the idea from Aristotle.

“The more you know, the more you know you don't know.”


Dunning-Kruger effect is no restatement of Aristotle.

From Rational Wiki:


The Dunning-Kruger effect (also Mount Stupid[1] or Smug Snake[2]),

named after David Dunning and Justin Kruger of Cornell University,

occurs where people fail to adequately assess their level of competence — or specifically, their incompetence — at a task and thus consider themselves much more competent than everyone else.

This lack of awareness is attributed to their lower level of competence robbing them of the ability to critically analyse their performance, leading to a significant overestimation of themselves.

edit on 13-11-2017 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

It just seems to me to be a logical conclusion. The more you know the more you realize you don't know, therefore the less you know the less you realize what you don't know.



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: Quadrivium
I personally find this hard to believe but hey, just read some of the post on ATS.



I think this definitely confirms the research



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom
a reply to: FyreByrd

It just seems to me to be a logical conclusion. The more you know the more you realize you don't know, therefore the less you know the less you realize what you don't know.


There is some truth buried in there.
Decades ago, we used to say: '80% of drivers think they are better that 80% of other drivers'. (No reference).

Seems self-over-confidence, and brashness are valued characteristics in this messed-up society.



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