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Jupiter’s Stunning Southern Hemisphere as Seen by NASA’s Juno Spacecraft

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posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:28 PM
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Another picture of one of our neighbors this time sent back by the Juno spacecraft , the image was captured on October 24th as Juno made its ninth close flyby of Jupiter passing just 20,577 miles from the planets atmosphere.


The image was created by citizen scientists Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran using raw images sent back by Juno and clearly shows the intricate nature of Jupiter’s swirling atmosphere.
Such beauty in nature
www.nasa.gov...




posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:31 PM
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Jupiter's better half checking up on him, and taking pictures to boot...



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Looks like the most perfect of all Easter Eggs.

Thanks for making my day.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:35 PM
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Are those big grapevines?



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Amazing images from an important planet in our solar system




An object, probably a comet that nobody saw coming, plowed into the giant planet’s colorful cloud tops sometime Sunday, splashing up debris and leaving a black eye the size of the Pacific Ocean. This was the second time in 15 years that this had happened. The whole world was watching when Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 fell apart and its pieces crashed into Jupiter in 1994, leaving Earth-size marks that persisted up to a year.


www.nytimes.com...



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Zcustosmorum




splashing up debris and leaving a black eye the size of the Pacific Ocean.

That's some black eye !



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Getting smacked by an object traveling at between 10 and 70 km/s, that's gotta hurt



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Just playing devils advocate here...

Let us take a look at the view from earth from HEO (high earth orbit of 22,000 miles) and observe how close the earth is, and how much of the picture is taken up.

Then take a look at this picture of Jupiter from supposedly the same altitude (relatively).

It seems to me Jupiter should take up the entire picture, or the viewing distance is nowhere close to 20,000 miles.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 12:59 PM
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damn, i marvel at those complex weather patterns



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 01:01 PM
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It seems to me Jupiter should take up the entire picture,
It does. Pretty much.
Here, do the math:

The spatial scale in this image is 13.86 miles/pixel (22.3 kilometers/pixel).


Some detail:

Junocam is a wide-angle camera designed to capture the unique polar perspective of Jupiter offered by Juno’s polar orbit.

www.missionjuno.swri.edu...


Gotta be fake. Right?

But it doesn't look real, I'll give you that. Saturn doesn't either, even when I look at it through a telescope it looks like a cheesy special effect.

edit on 11/12/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 03:16 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Brilliant!

I wanna go down there into the swirlie layer for a few hours in a 'zorb'!!


edit on 12-11-2017 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: chadderson
a reply to: gortex

Just playing devils advocate here...

Let us take a look at the view from earth from HEO (high earth orbit of 22,000 miles) and observe how close the earth is, and how much of the picture is taken up.

Then take a look at this picture of Jupiter from supposedly the same altitude (relatively).

It seems to me Jupiter should take up the entire picture, or the viewing distance is nowhere close to 20,000 miles.


You can't make comparisons like that without knowing about the cameras. Here are two photographs of our Moon taken from ~240,000 miles away.



If you were to take a picture of the Earth with Juno's wide-angle camera, it would appear much smaller.

The OP picture was taken 20,577 miles above the cloud-tops, which makes it ~64,000 miles from the center of Jupiter. Taking a picture at ~64,000 miles from its center, the Earth would appear ~1/11th the size of the Jovian disc in the OP image.

Hope this helps.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
Another picture of one of our neighbors this time sent back by the Juno spacecraft , the image was captured on October 24th as Juno made its ninth close flyby of Jupiter passing just 20,577 miles from the planets atmosphere.


Amazing, I'm wondering what all the peaks and troughs in the clouds represent, especially the 'beady eye' parts around left of center, and also a little lower down, it appears like yellow light is coming out from the inside.



files.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 12-11-2017 by smurfy because: Picture.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 06:31 PM
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On the bottom right quarter of Jupiter, round about 4 o'clock there is a bright blue colour on the edge, is that Jupiters atmosphere?



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 06:33 PM
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obviously this is fake, can't you see someone just spilled a couple of buckets oilpaint on a circular canvas. This should be thrown on the 'modern art ruble pile'


Seriously though, I've seen this before one night when the walls of my room were melting. I always knew I wasn't dreaming.

Wonder what that dark 'plume/shade' is in the left lower corner.

Thanks for sharing buddy! Juno kicks a$$ !



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 06:55 PM
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a reply to: Moohide

Everything you see in the image is Jupiter's atmosphere, actually. The planet is, for the most part, atmosphere.

I can't say what that blue edge represents. It could be an upper layer, or it could be an imaging artifact.

edit on 11/12/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: Phage

Is there any way that I could intercept the radio signals from these probes and put this data together myself? Seems like it should be possible with the right equipment and software...



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash
You could try but you'd need a very large dish to start with. That signal has to go a long long way to Earth. This is what is used.
www.nasa.gov...


edit on 11/12/2017 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 06:48 AM
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Jupiter is more interesting than anyone would think. The Atmosphere is made of many different mineral gases and smokes. This is what gives it all those strange ever changing mixtures depending on the different bands of mineral mud that make up all of the planets surface. The molten core of Jupiter is a hydrogen furnace. There is specifically a very hard iron based shell that surrounds the hydrogen core reactor of molten hydro lava.
The hydrogen based lava escapes through channels of cracked veins throughout the iron base to the Athenosphere.

The Athenosphere is exactly what heats up all the may miles of mud. Towards the top soil it's actually hard and spongy. The top soil almost functions like a slight trampoline effect. The gravity is Immense. I believe if any life could live here in the future, they would evolve as giants. This would be a planet for dinosaurs.



posted on Nov, 13 2017 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Ok thank you.

So basically the signals are so faint that I'd need some serious reception equipment just to get a good connection? Granted that I knew where to point them and how to make sense of the data I received, etc?

Do you know if any other nations take a first hand look at our probes signals? I'd think that at least historically, decades ago, Russia would have reviewed this information regularly.
edit on 11/13/2017 by muzzleflash because: (no reason given)




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