It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

IBM announces 50 qubit prototype quantum processor

page: 1
19
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 12:27 PM
link   

* The first IBM Q systems available online to clients will have a 20 qubit processor, featuring improvements in superconducting qubit design, connectivity and packaging. Coherence times (the amount of time available to perform quantum computations) lead the field with an average value of 90 microseconds, and allow high-fidelity quantum operations.

* IBM has also successfully built and measured an operational prototype 50 qubit processor with similar performance metrics. This new processor expands upon the 20 qubit architecture and will be made available in the next generation IBM Q systems.

Clients will have online access to the computing power of the first IBM Q systems by the end of 2017, with a series of planned upgrades during 2018. IBM is focused on making available advanced, scalable universal quantum computing systems to clients to explore practical applications. The latest hardware advances are a result of three generations of development since IBM first launched a working quantum computer online for anyone to freely access in May 2016. Within 18 months, IBM has brought online a 5 and 16 qubit system for public access through the IBM Q experience and developed the world's most advanced public quantum computing ecosystem.

IBM.com (press release), Nov. 10, 2017 - IBM Announces Advances to IBM Quantum Systems & Ecosystem.

Gizmodo.com - IBM’s Newest Quantum Computers Are the Most Powerful of Their Kind.

IBM gave open web access to their 5-qubit system. Then little more than a year later they upgraded to 15- and 17-qubit systems. And now today, they have built a 50-qubit system with up to 90 microseconds of coherence! If you signed up IBM Q you now have access to a 20-qubit system.

The thing about qubits, unlike regular binary bits, is that adding one makes exponential growth. Going from 5 to 15 is not a 3x growth but 5^3 (maybe not exactly that high, but the idea is that the growth rate is that huge). IBM also announced a 56-qubit quantum simulator. That means they have to add even more qubits for the so called "quantum supremacy" or that point where quantum technology out performs current computing (called "classical"!!) technology. There is also the stability issue (called "coherence" in quantum computing land) but I forget exactly how long that also has to be to have supremacy (you need both qubits and coherence over time to truly have quantum supremacy).

While not quite quantum supremacy this is a major announcement at what us clever little monkeys can do!

The field keeps growing by leaps and bounds! Here's to another step towards out future!





posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 12:38 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF




posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 12:42 PM
link   

A quantum computer is a completely different kind of computer. Rather than operating with bits that can only equal zeroes and ones like a regular computer, its bits, or “qubits,” equal zero and one at the same time while calculations are taking place. A user initializes these qubits, which is sort of like setting the weights on a weighted die, and then lets them interact via the mathematical rules of quantum mechanics. There are certain tasks, like factoring numbers and modeling molecules, where a quantum computer would be much faster than a regular computer. Today, each of these qubits are made from specially-fabricated electronics that must be held at temperatures near absolute zero.

Gizmodo.com link

I forgo to add this. This is a little explanation on how a quantum computer works with qubits.

It is almost backwards to a classical (!!) computer where you code a program to work on data to produce an output. With a quantum computer, you set up a relationship between qubits, then let the rules of quantum mechanics take over until a final state is read which is the solution to the question.

The whole algorithm involves arrays of states (real number arrays) which means you have (A x B) which is not the same as (B x A). You have to know both the math and quantum operations to write the algorithms.

I've made it as far as being able to read them but not write anything worthwhile. I'm still re-reading my quantum mechanics and physics books with the hopes making the leap!



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 12:47 PM
link   
a reply to: seasonal

Hehehe!


I think quantum computers will, at first, be something that only nations have (they are that finicky and expensive to operate) . You still need your "classical" computer to connect to the quantum computer (you will not have one on your desk anytime soon). So don't shoot just yet!

This announcement is kind of like an appetizer of what is coming. Next year will be the real race for supremacy.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 12:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: seasonal

Hehehe!


I think quantum computers will, at first, be something that only nations have (they are that finicky and expensive to operate) . You still need your "classical" computer to connect to the quantum computer (you will not have one on your desk anytime soon). So don't shoot just yet!

This announcement is kind of like an appetizer of what is coming. Next year will be the real race for supremacy.



Please explain further why they keep making these better without releasing a lesser version to the public?



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 01:02 PM
link   
a reply to: GraffikPleasure

They did!

They have a 20-qubit system available, today, right now, if you signed up to the IBM Q and toolkit. It is web based access, like a cloud service, and you need some credentials (like a degree in physics or computer science, or a teacher of same) but you can sign up for access. I think they also want to keep your algorithms if not theirs then at least part of their portfolio (it is published within the community but it is all hosted by IBM).

The stated plan is to release a better version of what has been announced today (50-qubit system) next year on the Q platform.




posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 01:56 PM
link   
Sounds interesting...now what the hell does all that mean?

Pleading ignorance, If I were to buy a quantum computer, what would I do with it?.. predict the future?



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:02 PM
link   
Which is an actual quantum processor unlike D-Wave’s quantum annealing qbit processors.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:05 PM
link   
a reply to: GraffikPleasure

Because there isn’t a practical and cost effective use outside of research right now.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: Tucket
Sounds interesting...now what the hell does all that mean?

Pleading ignorance, If I were to buy a quantum computer, what would I do with it?.. predict the future?


Regular computer systems will continue to be around well after q computing becomes common place.

This level of computing would be better used to supplement existing computing capabilities. A q computing system would be used for solving extremely complicated problems, for instance:

Stable protein fold configurations for medicine.

Genomic research.

Materials science.

Exotic matter analysis.

Faster than light communications using quantum entanglement isn’t far off either (think ST subspace) once they get their coherence variance nailed down.

There probably won’t be a q computer version of Call of Duty. But rest assured that a new age of quantum computing will lead to advances in medicine, technology, and communications that will have deep influence on our society.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:11 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

But is it still Turing computable?



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Tucket

Right now, you could not afford the cooling and special shielding to house a quantum computer. It literally sits in a room all by itself, bathed in liquid helium. That means expensive.

Right now, you can connect to IBM's 20-qubit computer via the web.

What can you do with one? Right now, not much more than demonstrate quantum algorithms. That may not sound like much but it is one thing to study something in theory and totally different when you have hands on experience. It is the difference between reading a driving manual and getting behind the wheel!

Right now, they are checking and verifying quantum algorithms. These are problems that either would take an extreme amount of time to run on a supercomputer or they cannot be modeled in one.

The big one is factoring numbers. We all know that 15 is made up of factors (3,5). When numbers get large, figuring out what numbers created that number becomes harder. That is what the internet relies upon to buy books from Amazon and watch Netflix. It is a method to guarantee that you are the individual using the services. Once a quantum computer is large enough that method, called RSA encryption, can be broken (two large prime numbers are multiplied together creating another one which is manipulated a bit making a unique "key". Factoring those prime numbers is so tough for a regular computer, like the one on your desktop, that everything is safe).

Other complex and/or computational heavy operations can be done an quantum computers. Like modeling molecules for new medicine or modeling materials like super conducting magnets. For example, nuclear fusion takes a supercomputer to model the nuclear plasma. It takes several days for refrigerator-sized computers to run a few seconds of the plasma model. With the complexity built into the quantum state within a quantum computer that should drop the time down to hours, or less.

All of this takes a different approach to computing. Meaning it all has to be re-learned. And you benefit if you know quantum mechanics because the concepts will not be foreign to you.

Hope that helped!




posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 02:40 PM
link   
a reply to: dfnj2015

I do not think it applies.

Like I've said, you are manipulating the data via quantum mechanics (or that is one method to visualize a quantum computer). I think that the quantum states will allow more plasticity into what is called AI which allows a broader spectrum to investigate (like a search algorithm starting broad then narrowing down to specific terms).

Both classical computing and quantum computing will be used in tandem. Where does the AI reside? Is more choices given back the "smart" part or is it the classical processor doing the heavy lifting?

IDK. But it will be fun to see what happens!



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 03:32 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
^^^
THIS explained it enough I barely grasp it, but kinda do, sort of.

Pleading ignorance, If I were to buy a quantum computer, what would I do with it?.. predict the future?


Read that an said "same as me buddy! we stare at the new bright shiny thing on the table." I also snarfeled my coffee all over, so thanks Tucket!!!



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 06:23 PM
link   
a reply to: Caver78

To truly explain takes math and physics... I’m trying to not go that route.

There are two separate methods of solving problems (computer wise). One is “set it and forget it” like we have now. The other is more like being a gourmet chef and seeing every little detail. There are problems that can be solved in a finite amount of time (could be years). Quantum computers can put those problems to sleep. The whole thing involves computation time. As quantum computers scale up, that time decreases. It is an inverse relationship. The difference is more about setting the problem up instead of brute forcing your way through.

That is where I see problems. People have to do this. And most do not understand the problem. Then it is chicken and the egg... then what??

This is like being there when the ENIAC was turned on. That is what I like. Witnesses to history.

We are pretty clever to do this so I see this as a moment in history.

Where we go... did people envision a computer in your hands that is more powerful than the one that took us to the moon?? That is what this is about. I have no idea where we go!



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 06:56 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

It's always going to be a race for bigger, better, faster then finally smaller. LOL!
Great to know there are people smart enough to envision this then build it an understand it.
I cheer them from afar!


Plus you explained it just fine, which I appreciated.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 09:23 PM
link   
a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Ok but I still don't get it...

Out most be to keep it close. But seriously, I'm looking at it from a graphical angle (I'm a graphic designer), it took a decade and a half to make Avatar, couldn't that animation and etc render faster? Or does it not work that way.

I see you mentioned it works backwards.

I guess I don't care about the practicality part of it, because people will buy it, make use of it and further their own dreams. Crap, they may even stumble upon some unknown answers to candy for all we know. I'm big on the people furthering technology on their own (hacking).

I just don't understand why they can't sell them for private use.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 10:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: GraffikPleasure

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: seasonal

Hehehe!


I think quantum computers will, at first, be something that only nations have (they are that finicky and expensive to operate) . You still need your "classical" computer to connect to the quantum computer (you will not have one on your desk anytime soon). So don't shoot just yet!

This announcement is kind of like an appetizer of what is coming. Next year will be the real race for supremacy.



Please explain further why they keep making these better without releasing a lesser version to the public?


They cost millions, and you have to be a math genius to program one.

Basically a 50 qubit system is inferior to a laptop anyway, but once the qubit start getting into the thousands, then they will quickly become much more powerful than supercomputers for certain types of problems.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 10:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: dfnj2015

I do not think it applies.

Like I've said, you are manipulating the data via quantum mechanics (or that is one method to visualize a quantum computer). I think that the quantum states will allow more plasticity into what is called AI which allows a broader spectrum to investigate (like a search algorithm starting broad then narrowing down to specific terms).

Both classical computing and quantum computing will be used in tandem. Where does the AI reside? Is more choices given back the "smart" part or is it the classical processor doing the heavy lifting?

IDK. But it will be fun to see what happens!



If it's not Turing computable then how will anyone know the results coming out of it are meaningful?



posted on Nov, 11 2017 @ 02:45 AM
link   
Quantum computers will be the workhorse middleware for mainly time intensive applications like weather forecasting, pattern recognition and signal processing like Fourier, RungaCutta and Spice analysis. They will not replace our CPU modeled processing, but will be called like super functions from these systems to do things in seconds that can take even a massively parallel system hours or days. They will solve mathematical problems we have not even considered yet and will enable AI to most likely become what everyone fears. Heady times ahead.




top topics



 
19
<<   2 >>

log in

join