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First KC-390 prototype grounded after near crash

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posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 06:20 PM
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The first KC-390 was grounded after a test flight on October 12th, after the aircraft exceeded its aerodynamic limits. The crew was performing pre-stall testing involving high AoA and icing situations. During the testing, some of the on-board testing equipment broke loose and rolled into the back of the cabin. This resulted in an immediate and unexpected CG shift aft.

Flight tracking software shows the aircraft exceeded -30,000 fpm, dropping from 20,000 feet to 3,000 feet. According to The Aviationist, ADS-B receivers don't work in the area below 2800 feet. An anonymous source with the program said the crew recovered the aircraft at just below 1,000 feet. The aircraft had stalled and gone into a spiral while descending.

theaviationist.com...[editby ]edit on 11/8/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 07:38 PM
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Zaphod; I meant to respond to your other thread. Kudos to this flight crew!
edit on 8-11-2017 by hitparader because: replied to wrong thread



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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my husband works on a kc 390 program, i will share this with him. what is your interest in this story? are you just sharing a failure or do you think there is more to the story?



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: SunnyDee

I actually really like this little plane. It's a really good design, and I think it'll fit several countries really well. I was just posting for those that follow test programs and might be interested.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:28 PM
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Is anybody else seeing weird formatting on this page?

I wonder how much this eventually costs. All because some engineers didn't take a few extra minutes to make sure their instrumentation was properly lashed down.

Kudos to the crew. Good training.

-dex



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:28 PM
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a reply to: hitparader

They did a hell of a job recovering.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That's a bad time. They might be down to one prototype for now if they overstressed it.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:55 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

SO had to make a few changes to the site and it altered the formatting a little.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 09:33 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Is he still working on it? The only place I'm seeing it is on this page in your OP. The personalized box at the bottom of your post is wrapped to the right of your text, in another column. And the text is overlapping on top of your avatar.

Looks like a style sheet issue.
-dex



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

Yeah, it'll probably get tweaked over the next few days as issues are found.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 10:24 PM
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I would have asked if I could have logged the time I was weightless as training credits towards NASA in the future.



posted on Nov, 9 2017 @ 08:55 AM
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OT - something is broken in this thread. It's throwing the formatting off



posted on Nov, 9 2017 @ 09:07 PM
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I forwarded this link to my husband, who had not heard about this, not had others he works with, granted his team is no longer on the 390 but others still are. He asked a Brazilian engineer stationed at his company about the incident, and the guy told him everything the same as this linked article, and that the water tanks that simulated cargo broke free while in a steep ascent. The plane is probably, or at least the structural parts, are now scrap.



posted on Nov, 9 2017 @ 09:13 PM
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a reply to: SunnyDee

That's gonna hurt. They were really lucky they were able to recover. The crew did an excellent job. Thanks for the information.



posted on Nov, 9 2017 @ 10:36 PM
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The flightradar track is scary. Plus the fact that items became loose in back. The last thing you want to to upset you COG



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: FredT

Pucker factor >9000

Jesus, I'd like to buy those guys a beer or 3



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I'm immediately thinking of that 747 in Afghanistan or Iraq. At least these guys had 20,000' to recover with. Kudos to the flight crew, that's the sort of experience that takes years off your life.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 10:49 AM
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a reply to: Barnalby

This is a great example of how dangerous a CG shift is. They had 20,000 feet to recover, and didn't recover recover until they were less than 1,000. Another 1-2000 feet down, and they don't. There was no way in hell that the 747 at Bagram was going to recover from that low, unless they recognized what happened immediately, and were incredibly lucky.



posted on Nov, 12 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The idea of entering flight attitudes normally seen flown by Extra 300s etc is absolutely terrifying. Just watching how quickly the Bagram Boeing lost altitude once it entered the stall/spin it makes it completely believable that this KC-390 incident could have played out in 30 seconds or less.

Excellent flying, but then again, that's why they're test pilots.
edit on 12-11-2017 by Barnalby because: (no reason given)



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