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Indian Scientists Successfully Fire Electromagnetic Railgun

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posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 03:43 AM
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Indian defence scientists have successfully developed electromagnetic railguns (EMRG) that can fire projectiles at Mach 6 (six times the speed of sound) or 4,600 miles per hour. Such railguns are touted as one of the future technologies of warfare, as they use kinetic and laser energy instead of controlled explosives for firing missiles. India expects to equip its naval forces with EMRG as the system has the potential to provide responsive, long-range, accurate and high-volume naval surface fire support. Railguns will also eventually be able to engage surface targets in direct-fire mode.



This will put India in a totally different league of defence and at par with US and Russia and above some of the other European countries. With an already developing hypersonic missile(Brahmos 2), Laser(KALI) and rail gun, From what I know the research into this program has been underway since the eighties and some tests were carried out in eighties itself. There is a research paper published on those testings and it is the only revaluation of the project so far as I know. I assume the first operational ships with these weapons will be out by 2024 or 2025 under the Project 18 program.
edit on 8-11-2017 by maddy21 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 04:10 AM
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a reply to: maddy21


as they use kinetic and laser energy instead of controlled explosives for firing missiles


No. The electromagnetic impulse coming from activating electromagnets in the correct sequence "pulls" or "pushes" a missile (better word: projectile, as it does not have an active power unit itself) out of the gun. Drop the words "laser" or "kinetic" although we could discuss the use of the latter.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 04:35 AM
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Yeah I saw a guy on YouTube make one of these 10 years ago, in his garage. Well done India.

Now can you use your rail guns to fire projectiles through the earth for sewage to keep off the street?



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 05:21 AM
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deleted...no point replying to trolls
edit on 8-11-2017 by maddy21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: maddy21

My son and his friend made one for a science project. Built with 5 capacitors and my lawn mover battery..



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 05:56 AM
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a reply to: maddy21

If we combine an electromagnetic rail gun technology with plasma igniting technology we will create a ray gun!



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 06:28 AM
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Here's the US Rail Gun that can fire projectiles at mach 7 to a distance of 160km....



The US Navy may install the Railgun for the Zumwalt-Class Destroyer....



And here's a pic of the successful Indian Railgun trial conducted yesterday after it hit the target.


edit on 8-11-2017 by OrionHunterX because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-11-2017 by OrionHunterX because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 07:28 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
a reply to: maddy21


as they use kinetic and laser energy instead of controlled explosives for firing missiles


. Drop the words "laser" or "kinetic" although we could discuss the use of the latter.


Kinetic energy delivered by denser projectiles like depleted Uranium for instance, make up for any lack of 'velocity'.

Problem is unguided kinetic rounds have to be streamed at a target to be effective.

Maybe in naval warfare thats feasible, ships are big enough to hold all the apparatus. But even then a single guided hypersonic missile is way more effective.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: maddy21




as they use kinetic and laser energy instead of controlled explosives for firing missiles


Next thing you know they'll be cornering the Vimana market. Rumor has it they are up to their Brahmanical cords in time-travel tech and anti-gravity. Mahabharata stuff, you know?



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
a reply to: maddy21


as they use kinetic and laser energy instead of controlled explosives for firing missiles


No. The electromagnetic impulse coming from activating electromagnets in the correct sequence "pulls" or "pushes" a missile (better word: projectile, as it does not have an active power unit itself) out of the gun. Drop the words "laser" or "kinetic" although we could discuss the use of the latter.


Ha! One individual that knows absolutely nothing about the topic trying to correct someone else. Railguns do not use a series of electromagnets activated in sequence. What you are describing is a coil gun. You only have to go as far as Wikipedia to see this...



the railgun differs from a traditional electric motor[7] in that no use is made of additional field windings (or permanent magnets)

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 11:58 AM
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They will be shooting them at baby elephants soon



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: intrptr



Problem is unguided kinetic rounds have to be streamed at a target to be effective. Maybe in naval warfare thats feasible, ships are big enough to hold all the apparatus. But even then a single guided hypersonic missile is way more effective.

I believe I read something to that effect recently. There's also the huge (yuge?) electric power requirements, so many of the existing surface ships can't be retrofitted with rail guns. And I believe there is a charge time between firings that limits the number of projectiles that can be launched per minute. Then there is the heat problem. A projectile travelling at Mach 7 when it exits the barrel is creating a lot of heat, thus limiting the useful lifetime of that component.

So, it is my understanding, that the Navy is putting all their eggs in the hypersonic missile basket. A greater cost per projectile, but more easily deployed across the fleet.

-dex



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 04:28 PM
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Proud of him. We've had these for years...hell you can buy them from Bass Pro Shops...
a reply to: maddy21



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 04:31 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

Much more destructive per unit as well, on both sides of conflict. The last time we saw 'guided' missiles attacking Navy surface ships was WWII, the next time it will be the same sort of attack, but with hypersonic sea skimming missiles...



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 05:01 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

And a hell of a lot harder to do. There is currently something like one active hypersonic missile, and many failed attempts. There are two that have actually flown as part of their development programs, but they've ran into their own problems.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: DexterRiley

And a hell of a lot harder to do. There is currently something like one active hypersonic missile, and many failed attempts. There are two that have actually flown as part of their development programs, but they've ran into their own problems.

So, do you mean that the R&D for railgun technology is much further along than hypersonic missiles?

I suppose that makes sense. It's easier to develop a stationary piece of hardware and lob dumb hypersonic projectiles at a target. Developing a self-contained piece of hardware that needs to function from the time it's launched until it reaches its target has a lot more potential points of failure.

But, I was under the impression that the Navy had scaled back its railgun plans in favor of other hypersonic projectile technologies. I don't recall where I read that, but it's likely I found it on ATS.

-dex



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 08:26 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

They originally scaled it back in favor of LRLAP, which is part of the Advanced Gun System. Then they found out that each round of LRLAP ammunition is something insane like $800,000. So now they're reevaluating their future weapon system plans. They just tested a hypersonic missile that fits in an Ohio tube, but it's only a demonstrator, not an actual weapon system.



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 09:12 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

We should aim to systematise the plasma ignition as being centred around a small but electromagnetically dynamic particle which is delivered by miniaturised rail gun technology - a particle which has the ability conferred as an EM 'stamp' to generate plasma confinement fields/matrices based around the generation of virtual anode/ cathode shells (and for a bonus also retains kinetic damage potential). With the ignited ball of plasma supporting the work of the 'needle-like' entry made by our tiny electromagnetically dynamic particle screeching into whatever you're shooting at, THAT is when we have a true ray gun.

'Needle gun' has a catchy ring to it, come to think of it...



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: DexterRiley

They originally scaled it back in favor of LRLAP, which is part of the Advanced Gun System. Then they found out that each round of LRLAP ammunition is something insane like $800,000. So now they're reevaluating their future weapon system plans. They just tested a hypersonic missile that fits in an Ohio tube, but it's only a demonstrator, not an actual weapon system.


How exactly can they spend billions of dollars to build a high tech weapon system and not account for how much the ammunition costs?

So is that cluster frack another symptom of the Navy's current procurement insanity?

-dex



posted on Nov, 8 2017 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: DexterRiley

It's more the Pentagon in general.

They're talking about switching to Excaliber. It reduces the range to 30 miles, but the ammunition is about $70,000 a round. It would require a $250M modification to the Zumwalts.



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