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Navigating Inland Waterways Using Needles Paddles And Rymers

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posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 11:03 AM
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I recently discovered evidence of a modular weir in Kepier Gorge, Durham, Albion. Grooves have been worn into the bedrock where ironclad components were dragged into position. I had no idea what such weirs or dams looked like. A little research online taught me a lot about the simple but difficult and dangerous to operate modular weirs and dams that were once common on our inland waterways.


. . . their manual operation is considered to be dangerous, and involves lifting weights which exceed those recommended by the Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992.
en.wikipedia.org...

All Hail the Manual Handling Operations Regulations of 1992.

To get an idea of the difficulties encountered while operating a needle dam watch this video from 6:19.
I expect a paddle and rymer weir presents similar challenges.


Paddle and rymer weirs uses a combination of posts and wider paddles.



www.barefootcampsites.co.uk...


Some paddle and rymer weirs and needle dams have movable upper frames allowing larger boats to pass through.


thames.me.uk...


Using this technology people with basic woodworking skills and access to suitable timber could turn a shallow stream into a navigable waterway. A disused weir or dam would soon be plundered for building wood or firewood and floods would disperse the rest. Very little would remain to show how extensive the navigable inland waterways were in the past.




posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 11:15 AM
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a reply to: Kester

Damn manual labor, full progress ahead.

Very interesting blast from the past.

Ever see the film, Man in the Wilderness? Even though its older and sometimes corny, you might like it. About a ships crew that haul their vessel overland, pursued by a man they left to die, in the wilderness...



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

In the province I live in NB the natives used the river systems, tides and short portage over land to connect to other rivers carrying then many many miles . Kind of a romantic thing to ponder .



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 12:08 PM
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originally posted by: the2ofusr1
a reply to: intrptr

In the province I live in NB the natives used the river systems, tides and short portage over land to connect to other rivers carrying then many many miles . Kind of a romantic thing to ponder .


Here in CA. the sacramento river delta has over 600 miles of river delta roads. I've spent a lot of time fishing and camping on them. Very romantic, tranquil and quiet out there, indeed.



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

We used to canoe down the owens river by bishop, ca. What a beautiful area. Not to mention the hot springs all over the owens valley. Some nestled right up on the foothills. You can see the whole valley with the sierra nevadas stretching out. Beautiful, too bad it's so damn expensive to live there!



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: Kester

I nearly drove a narrow boat over a weir while sorting out a row my kids were having once. You'd never know 3Mph could be so scary


Another good thread though.

One thing about weirs is they attract some types of fish and put off others from that stretch. Barbel, for instance, love the aerated downstream stretches below weirs.
Other species, not so much.



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