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Does light last forever

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posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:34 PM
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Surround yourself with lights, to keep the darkness at bay. The sun, a window, the dim glow of a candle or in modern times even the light of the television at night to keep you tethered to the slightest bit of light. It all just seems to wear down eventually, even the brightest light seems to lose it's strength as the darkness bides it's time and inches in closer and closer. It almost seems inevitable, it seems as though it's a matter of when, not if.

Is that just the human condition?

Can anyone truly ever hide from it forever?




posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:36 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Billions of years from now the last star in the universe will blink out.
So , no.



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: MisterSpock

Billions of years from now the last star in the universe will blink out.
So , no.


I tried to set a reminder on my phone calender for that, but it doesn't go out that far.



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:40 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Sometimes the darkness and the quite solitude is a welcome relief and a balance to too much light. Beside the darkness brings out it's own universe.



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:41 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Use a PC it has more ram? LOL



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog

But how far will this last star's light travel? Endlessly?



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Life consumes light. (Energy).
Perhaps as a feeble attempt at staving-off the inevitable darkness?



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 08:27 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

time dilation reaches zero at the speed of light, meaning, light doesn't experience time, it is infinite, photons will live forever unless their path is interfered with.

all this talk of stars is about the producers of photons, the creators of light, not light itself...
edit on 2-11-2017 by NobodiesNormal because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 08:35 PM
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a reply to: NobodiesNormal

What about the inverse-square law? Doesn't light eventually just "die"? Or fade away...



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: LightSpeedDriver

I think it continues on a vector until it encounters a substance or medium that either absorbs it, deflects it or [whoof!] crushes it, i.e. DeathStar.



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: Gothmog




Billions of years from now the last star in the universe will blink out. So , no.
That sounds like a lot of energy destroyed .Where does that energy go though ?



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: denybedoomed
a reply to: Gothmog

But how far will this last star's light travel? Endlessly?

Above all else , light is radiation. Eventually it would lose its go. (but that is included in the original time frame)
And I should have said trillions. When am I gonna learn not to post while working ?



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: MisterSpock

Energy cannot be created or destroyed.

but light will diffuse towards entropy.



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 10:51 PM
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originally posted by: MisterSpock

originally posted by: Gothmog
a reply to: MisterSpock

Billions of years from now the last star in the universe will blink out.
So , no.

I tried to set a reminder on my phone calender for that, but it doesn't go out that far.


You should get an Aztec one.



edit on 2/11/2017 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: LightSpeedDriver
a reply to: NobodiesNormal

What about the inverse-square law? Doesn't light eventually just "die"? Or fade away...


It can diffuse (spread out) down to individual photons but they are an indivisible unit and will last forever.



posted on Nov, 3 2017 @ 10:03 AM
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What do you see right now? Light. When your light fades (you grow old and die) there are many more people coming into the light through birth. So no, the light that we all share never fades or dies in my opinion. Light is energy and energy cannot be created nor destroyed.

Darkness is not light yet we can still see darkness. What is it that allows us to see darkness? The universal light within us.
edit on 11/3/2017 by 3NL1GHT3N3D1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 3 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Darkness is not light yet we can still see darkness. What is it that allows us to see darkness? The universal light within us.


Could one extrapolate from that: The darkness within allows us to see light?



posted on Nov, 3 2017 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: Nothin

I don't think that makes much sense personally, but maybe I'm not looking at it in the right way?

If you are in a pitch black room you can see the darkness around you. A person born blind does not see darkness, they literally see nothing, not even darkness. We are able to see it though, that is the "light of God" spoken of in holy books in my opinion, the light that allows us to experience life, the light of consciousness.



posted on Nov, 3 2017 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: 3NL1GHT3N3D1
It wasn't entirely clear to me when you are using the word "light" in a literal sense and when you're using it in a figurative sense. The 2 are not 100% the same thing.

LIGHT (as used in the bible):

The Hebrew term ʼohr and the Greek term phos refer to that which emanates from a light-giving body such as a lamp (Jer 25:10) or the sun, as well as to the opposite of darkness, literally and figuratively. (Isa 5:20; Joh 11:10, 11)

When you were talking about "the light of God" that would be a figurative use of the word light I presume (even though you said something about literal light and literal darkness before that and connected it to that phrase by saying "that is the "light of God" spoken of"; which is the part that confuses me in your comment)? One probably shouldn't attempt to match every aspect or attribute of literal light with figurative or spiritual light (or spiritual enlightenment, spiritual illumination). Often, when used in the bible in a figurative sense, it's primarily referring to the aspect of making things clearer to the viewer, which is what both literal light does to literal things, but figurative light or spiritual light for spiritual matters. So there are similarities, but there are also slight differences; literal light helps with the perception of one's physical eyes, yet spiritual light helps with the perception of one's mind regarding spiritual matters. On top of that, the word "light" is used with multiple different figurative applications and figurative meanings in the bible, sometimes highlighting different aspects or attributes of literal light that are similar, but often not all at once (or not all fit or apply in that particular context).

“God is light and there is no darkness at all in union with him.” (1Jo 1:5) He is righteous, upright, and holy (De 32:4; Re 4:8), having nothing in common with the degrading and unclean practices commonly linked with darkness. (Compare Job 24:14-16; 2Co 6:14; 1Th 5:7, 8.) Therefore persons who are walking in the darkness by manifesting hatred for their brother and who are not practicing the truth could never be in union with him.—1Jo 1:6; 2:9-11.

Jehovah is “the Father of the celestial lights.” (Jas 1:17) Not only is he the “Giver of the sun for light by day, the statutes of the moon and the stars for light by night” (Jer 31:35) but he is also the Source of all spiritual enlightenment. (2Co 4:6) His law, judicial decisions, and word are a light to those allowing themselves to be guided by them. (Ps 43:3; 119:105; Pr 6:23; Isa 51:4) The psalmist declared: “By light from you we can see light.” (Ps 36:9; compare Ps 27:1; 43:3.) Just as the light of the sun continues to get brighter from dawn until “the day is firmly established,” so the path of the righteous ones, illuminated by godly wisdom, gets lighter and lighter. (Pr 4:18) To follow the course that Jehovah outlines is to walk in his light. (Isa 2:3-5) On the other hand, when a person looks at things in an impure way or with evil design, he is in great spiritual darkness. As Jesus put it: “If your eye is wicked, your whole body will be dark. If in reality the light that is in you is darkness, how great that darkness is!”—Mt 6:23; compare De 15:9; 28:54-57; Pr 28:22; 2Pe 2:14.

Also, by their fine works, by word and example, followers of Christ let their light shine. (Mt 5:14, 16; compare Ro 2:17-24.) “The fruitage of the light consists of every sort of goodness and righteousness and truth.” (Eph 5:9)

Other Figurative Uses. The Scriptures contain many figurative references to light. Ability to see is meant by the words “the light of my own eyes.” (Ps 38:10) For God to “give light” to someone means that he gives them life or allows them to continue living. (Job 3:20, 23; compare Ps 56:13.) “Children that have seen no light” are those who are born dead. (Job 3:16; compare Ps 49:19.) “It is good for the eyes to see the sun” may be understood to mean ‘it is good to be alive.’—Ec 11:7.

Morning light is picturesquely described as ‘taking hold of the ends of the earth and shaking the wicked out of it,’ because dawn disperses evildoers. Darkness is their “light,” for they are accustomed to carrying out their evil deeds under its cover, and this figurative “light” is taken from them by the literal light of dawn.—Job 38:12-15; compare Job 24:15-17.

As the light of the sun is clearly observable, thus Jehovah’s adverse judgments are obvious. This is alluded to at Hosea 6:5: “The judgments upon you will be as the light that goes forth.”

The ‘light of God’s face’ means divine favor. (Ps 44:3; 89:15) “Lift up the light of your face upon us” is an expression meaning ‘show us favor.’ (Ps 4:6) Similarly, the favor of a ruler is referred to as “the light of the king’s face.”—Pr 16:15.

Light may denote brightness or cheerfulness, the opposite of gloom. (Job 30:26) This may explain the words of Job (29:24): “The light of my face they would not cast down.” Although others were gloomy and dejected, this did not cause Job to become of like disposition.

A bright prospect, such as salvation or deliverance, is at times referred to under the figure of light. (Es 8:16; Ps 97:11; Isa 30:26; Mic 7:8, 9) Jehovah’s causing his glory to shine forth upon Zion pointed forward to her deliverance from a captive state. As a result Zion was to become a source of enlightenment to the nations. (Isa 60:1-3, 19, 20; compare Re 21:24; 22:5.) On the other hand, for the sun, moon, and stars not to give their light would signify calamity.—Isa 13:10, 11; Jer 4:23; Eze 32:7, 8; Mt 24:29.

I do think if MisterSpock wanted to talk only about literal light as he does in the OP, the thread might be better suited for another subforum (not sure which one, General Chit Chat?).

edit on 3-11-2017 by whereislogic because: (no reason given)




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