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"Plane sized" void found in the great pyramid

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posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 12:23 AM
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I thought the international measurement of 'things' was either football fields or double decker busses?

I recon it contains the remains of the guys who mistakenly built themselves inside.




posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 03:02 AM
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originally posted by: RavenSpeaks
a reply to: Dr X
Cool .
I also discovered a void in a pyramid:

I wonder if there's some kind of deep connection.
Notice that the zero at the peak aligns with the
letter "O" in "VOID"


The "O" would be the location of the Queen's chamber. The "C" would be the location of the King's chamber. The number "8" would be the location of the new void. This might have real meaning if both the Phoenicians and Arabs built the great pyramid as a team. I think the Egyptians get all the credit for this construct. Thanks for sharing.

It's funny how the word "VOID" fits nicely in that arrangement.
edit on 4-11-2017 by lostinspace because: added funny about VOID word



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 09:20 AM
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originally posted by: TheScale

originally posted by: Justoneman

originally posted by: Butterfinger
Elon Musk needs to start "Pyramid X" for ways to open up the chambers.

We can send up the robot Djedi, but thats not good enough. I think it will turn into the Oak Island treasure fiasco when they sent down the rover that just bounced around in the corner the whole time!

Keep the Lagina Bros out of Egypt!

I wish we could take it apart and take a look at stuff, and put it back again. Too many of the stones are going to be bigger than we can move. Any drilling into the stone to cut into the void might start a war.


theres a frenchman who sold all his belongings and dedicated his life to figuring out the pyramids. him along with a 3d graphics company have identified other non load bearing blocks that they would also like to move but have been denied so far. theres also a void that spirals up the pyramid that was detected by a japanese team i believe decades ago and still we have nothing done there and all it takes is to move one block and theyd know if the void really exists.


All these teams of professionals who make the discoveries have strict orders to what they can and can’t do or touch in the Giza plateau, are closely watched by the Minister of State for Antiquities Affairs. When these unknown voids, and / or chambers are found they are FORBIDDEN to touch anything and just leave the discovery as is. Just like the team who televised the robot going up the shafts, only to proceed any further after the second little room.
But in reality, when the discoveries are made and the original team is long gone, then comes in the archeologist from the ministry of the state and they proceed to see what’s really in there.

We will never, ever know the true history of the Sphinx or the great pyramid. Only if a high level insider comes forward.
edit on 4-11-2017 by Matt11 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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the most interesting and telling info is from Sébastien Procureur:

That means that the muon detectors did NOT show general voids in the stone mass, as Hawass claims but (probable) structures.

www.bbc.com...



Sébastien Procureur, from CEA-IRFU, University of Paris-Saclay, emphasised that muography only sees large features, and that the team's scans were not just picking up a general porosity inside the pyramid.
"With muons you measure an integrated density," he explained. "So, if there are holes everywhere then the integrated density will be the same, more or less, in all directions, because everything will be averaged. But if you see some excess of muons, it means that you have a bigger void.
"You don't get that in a Swiss cheese."




edit on 4-11-2017 by anti72 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2017 @ 06:03 PM
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a reply to: Dr X

An intriguing discovery, probably the most exciting find since Gantenbrink's door (IMO at least). This NYT article includes some interesting opinions from archaelogists and engineers regarding what the void could be. Here some excerpts:

Mark Lehner:

Previous work had shown that the ancient Egyptians most likely constructed gaps in their pyramids and that the voids the team found are nothing special, or new.


Zahi Hawass:

“They found nothing,” said Dr. Hawass, noting that such construction gaps had been known of for at least two decades. “This paper offers nothing to Egyptology. Zero.”


Hany Helal:

"From an engineering perspective, it would not make sense to have such a big void above the Gallery if its purpose was to relieve pressure."


Maybe Hawass and Lehner are going out on a limb here with their assessment?



posted on Nov, 5 2017 @ 05:42 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

I agree. Many things related to the pyramids will continue to remain a mystery.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: Hanslune
a reply to: Kandinsky

Kewl! It may be awhile but they will at some point drill in and place a camera/robot into both. I do hope something of interest is found - I suspect something like the relieving chambers - ie rocks, dust and maybe some graffiti!

I hope I am wrong

Most probably and then that idiot in charge will tell us all not to get excited because there is nothing in there worth bothering about. And that will be the end of that...as far as we are concerned...no pictures, no nothing.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
a reply to: Dr X

An intriguing discovery, probably the most exciting find since Gantenbrink's door (IMO at least). This NYT article includes some interesting opinions from archaelogists and engineers regarding what the void could be. Here some excerpts:

Mark Lehner:

Previous work had shown that the ancient Egyptians most likely constructed gaps in their pyramids and that the voids the team found are nothing special, or new.


Zahi Hawass:

“They found nothing,” said Dr. Hawass, noting that such construction gaps had been known of for at least two decades. “This paper offers nothing to Egyptology. Zero.”


Hany Helal:

"From an engineering perspective, it would not make sense to have such a big void above the Gallery if its purpose was to relieve pressure."


Maybe Hawass and Lehner are going out on a limb here with their assessment?


Lehner and Hawass can go and do one, as far as I am concerned.
Personally, none of their "expert" opinions hold any water with me.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: fromtheskydown

Lehner and Hawass can go and do one, as far as I am concerned.
Personally, none of their "expert" opinions hold any water with me.


It's definitely a strange reaction on their part. In yet another article archaeologists are also complaining about how the news is presented in popular media, with too many headlines about mysterious chambers and secret rooms fuelling the fringe domain.

Looks like some folks already got their minds made up, in terms of this not being a big discovery. But even if it's just a structural void, it will shed light on the construction techniques applied by the ancient builders. If it's more than that, well the better. But the lack of excitement by some members of the archaeological community is a bit puzzling, if not disturbing.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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This reminds me of one of "Thoth's" quotes about a ship. Anyone have any information on the location, or possible location of a ship?
edit on 6-11-2017 by hiddenlight because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 02:39 PM
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a reply to: hiddenlight

See SeaWorthy's posts earlier in this thread (pg 2 or 3)


edit on 6-11-2017 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: add link to post in question



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: jeep3r

originally posted by: fromtheskydown

Lehner and Hawass can go and do one, as far as I am concerned.
Personally, none of their "expert" opinions hold any water with me.


It's definitely a strange reaction on their part. In yet another article archaeologists are also complaining about how the news is presented in popular media, with too many headlines about mysterious chambers and secret rooms fuelling the fringe domain.

Looks like some folks already got their minds made up, in terms of this not being a big discovery. But even if it's just a structural void, it will shed light on the construction techniques applied by the ancient builders. If it's more than that, well the better. But the lack of excitement by some members of the archaeological community is a bit puzzling, if not disturbing.

I actually think that the level of arrogance from Lehner and Hawass is nothing short of a slap in the face for the average person whose interest is piqued by the mysteries behind the pyramids. Hawass has a lot to answer for and the mainstream media, whose masses follow them like mindless sheep, peddle his nonsense like it is the gospel truth.

Why on earth would a "structural void" be used to relieve stresses and strains on the construction itself. As a layman, I would believe that it would only serve to weaken the structure.



posted on Nov, 10 2017 @ 10:05 AM
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originally posted by: fromtheskydown

originally posted by: jeep3r

originally posted by: fromtheskydown

Lehner and Hawass can go and do one, as far as I am concerned.
Personally, none of their "expert" opinions hold any water with me.


It's definitely a strange reaction on their part. In yet another article archaeologists are also complaining about how the news is presented in popular media, with too many headlines about mysterious chambers and secret rooms fuelling the fringe domain.

Looks like some folks already got their minds made up, in terms of this not being a big discovery. But even if it's just a structural void, it will shed light on the construction techniques applied by the ancient builders. If it's more than that, well the better. But the lack of excitement by some members of the archaeological community is a bit puzzling, if not disturbing.

I actually think that the level of arrogance from Lehner and Hawass is nothing short of a slap in the face for the average person whose interest is piqued by the mysteries behind the pyramids. Hawass has a lot to answer for and the mainstream media, whose masses follow them like mindless sheep, peddle his nonsense like it is the gospel truth.

Why on earth would a "structural void" be used to relieve stresses and strains on the construction itself. As a layman, I would believe that it would only serve to weaken the structure.

To direct the huge downward force of the massive amount of stone above it to the two sides of the known void (grand gallery) below it. Like what was done above the explored chambers.

What you perceive as arrogance on the parts of those two Egyptologists is actually solid expertise. You can't know much about Ancient Egypt unless you actually study what has been found over the last 200 years in Egypt, which both of these men certainly have done.

The desire to believe something other than what is known about Ancient Egypt should not get in the way of conclusions/hypotheses made that are based on the factual evidence that has been found there.

Harte
edit on 11/10/2017 by Harte because: of the wonderful things he does!



posted on Nov, 11 2017 @ 04:35 PM
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How about that some time after the outer casings were stripped, the pyramid developed a leak?
So the water trickles down ward, meets a substabtially softer chunk of inner limestone, dissolves some of that, leaving a space for further water to pool. And that going on to damage a larger area, thus leaving a large void?

Think how about they use IED's ona road.
The make a hole and explode a small charge, that makes room for a larger charge with a substantial frangible plug on top?

Im no geologist, just thinking horses instead of zebras!




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