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Instead of golfing, Rich millennials decided to create their own victory gardens called agrihoods.

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posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 09:49 PM
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Rich Millennials are now abandoning golf in favor of creating their own victory gardens called agrihood.



Many so-called agrihoods — short for "agricultural neighborhoods" — are cropping up around the US, and they're aimed at farm-to-table-loving millennials.

Loosely defined by the Urban Land Institute as master-planned housing communities with working farms as their focus, agrihoods have ample green space, barns, and outdoor community kitchens. Some boast greenhouses and rows and rows of fruit trees. The homes are typically built to high environmental standards — think solar panels and composting.

Agrihoods are designed to appeal to young, active families who love to eat healthy and spend time outdoors — and they're not off the grid.





All residents have access to communal farms with orchards and workshop space, raised planters, in-ground crops, fruit trees, and a laundry list of seasonal community events. But newly built homes there aren't cheap, ranging from the low $400,000s to more than $1 million.


www.businessinsider.com...

I gotta say maybe it may be useful to implement this concept elsewhere in the country especially if shtf. With so many fruit trees and other agricultural plants, these will be valuable in post shtf US.
edit on 10/30/2017 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 09:56 PM
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this has always been one one of my "if i win the lottery" business dreams. Buy a large swath of land and make every need usefull. all homes have separate grey water drainage to fruit trees, solar, equestrian center, greenhouses, chickens etc.

i already live on a small ranchette, but making things more reusable just makes sense.



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:00 PM
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a reply to: SunnyDee

The only issue with this concept is that a lot of people are doing it near an urban area (which is a huge no no because when shtf, the cities will be the first to fall) but other than that, if you can do this outside the city, it is pretty useful.
edit on 10/30/2017 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:02 PM
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This is so cool. I would love this. My cousin lives in MI and they have a community garden where people have their own plots for their "household" and they share and trade etc...

This is awesome.

-Alee



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:04 PM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

I've worked for country clubs before. They are the worse managed businesses I've ever seen in my life. They go off of the business model "if you build it, they will come". It's comical.

Once peak oil prices come into play, we'll see the shift of influence from players.

Should we stay on an oil drivin logistics delivery, you'll see regional vendors make a comeback.

The plus side is health is better for consumers getting goods regionally.



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: CriticalStinker

Honestly, I never understand the point of creating too much country clubs. I believe it is very wasteful. At least these people are now finally trying to make the land more useful and productive.

Also, they can make money out of this by selling the excess fruits and veggies.

In addition, we cannot rely too much on importing fruits and veggies from third world nations.
edit on 10/30/2017 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:16 PM
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Yeah, a neighborhood I looked at had a community garden. It's an apartment complex, too, so it was entirely expected. But, they hailed it as an attractive feature in the tour.

"Feel free to work in the community garden, plant what you want, take care of other produce, and pick what you want."

It's a really nice and nurturing environment, to be honest.



posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 10:48 PM
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Good...

More tee times for me...

-Chris



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 01:31 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

Im not big on rich millenials, but its a great idea to have community gardening.
edit on 31-10-2017 by pirhanna because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 04:34 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

I really had to chuckle, you know yourself this is actually called a Commune,. So they slap a new name on it, focus it at the rich Probably as a method to get food that has not been doused in Roundup and god know's what else.

Practically these are ideal as the economy is not stable, food sources can fluctuate and having your own food source is the most logical step forward.

Though not much used for it any more this was the original purpose of Back Gardens over here in Blighty as well, they were in some respects' a legacy idea from the small holding concept were a peasant would grow some vegetables upon there tiny plot of land.

The most perfectly realized commune's though are the Kibbutz community's of Israel.

So it is a fantastic idea but up marketing it is just hilarious, Selling the Old as the New - well it is practical, common sense and it work's, also it allow's these community's to forego the corporate dosing of there food that has caused male fertility to drop and chemically castrated all of us peon's.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 05:36 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

400k to a million dollars for a green home? Sounds like a complete rip off to me.

People have built them for next to no nothing using volunteer help and mostly recycled materials. Often with stunning and results too.

Good luck getting planning permission for one though, at least hear in the UK. Such is the backwards mentally of the Bearcats in charge of such things.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 05:49 AM
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Then there will be rules and more rules and committees and more committees and groups and huddle spaces and processes to kick people out.

Good for a laugh




posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 06:48 AM
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Not a bad idea. The $400,000 - $1,000,000 price tag is a little crazy.

My question is who works the farm while the millennials are off at work trying to cover down on a million dollar mortgage?

Call me a PITA, would not be the first time. What is the ratio of mouths to garden space? How much arugula can one Millennial eat? While I applaud the idea of growing some of their own food, it is far from a new idea. A generation or two ago, everyone had their own garden and chickens.

I like the idea but it sounds like a marketing ploy to the historically deficient. It's still better than a Walmart parking lot.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 07:03 AM
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Rich people can afford to have a neighborhood farm and go golfing. This article is pretty lame.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 07:07 AM
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As a millenial, I agree.

Seriously, I've had this urge to always want to build a greenhouse, something involving agriculture for my home. Obviously don't have that kind of cash, but having a large green space full of natural fruits and veggies is perfect.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 07:50 AM
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I forgot they will have to have a leader a vice leader a section leader an crop leader and on and on and on. Then they will hire illegals to do all the physical labor.




posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: starwarsisreal

I am a long time gardener and I tend to lean more toward the European style of row houses and long private gardens. Just like cooking, everyone has their own style and methods of gardening. We already know people can't agree on anything. So if you have some people that want organic, and others that are serious about bug control there will be issues. Growing food is a serious undertaking that most people really can't comprehend the work until they have done it for years. I'm not talking about a cute herb garden on the porch, i'm talking about actually growing enough to feed your family. Also in communal gardens who gets the best fruit/veggies? I just think about visiting the community pool, people are such jerks, they put their towel on a chair and then don't use it the whole day. My guess is that communal farming would be similar.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 11:06 AM
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stop hating on well to do people



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767
How very perceptive. But you didn't take your explanation to it's logical step. Oh, quite rightly it is a commune and, and, the idea behind this collective, no, no, a selective collective, is as the name suggests COMMUNISTIC.
Yes you read that right this method is communism in it's whole working. Tell them that and stand back and watch their back flips to tell you different.



posted on Oct, 31 2017 @ 12:40 PM
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"Developers in Palm Springs, California, are transforming an 18-hole golf course into a 70-acre olive-tree grove, The Register reported. It will serve as the epicenter of a new 300-acre agrihood called Miralon, which is scheduled to break ground later this year and eventually include dog parks, exercise stations, fire pits, and over six miles of hiking paths formerly used for golf carts."

Palm springs has more golf courses than people that actually live in the city. If they turned half of the golf courses into farms they could probably feed Southern California for free.




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