It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

An opioid named Squirrel

page: 3
28
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:05 PM
link   

originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: angeldoll

i dont care what people post as far as articles and stats as to how bad it is.
it is getting better. i know this for a fact.
i am 40 in march and i have been on some opiate(prescribed or recreation) since i was 21. i have talked about this before. it is disgusting but i bet i have taken 20,000 pills(just opiates) in my life.
from recreation only to prescribed only to prescribed and a little extra on the side.

gone are the days when you can go to the er and get a script of 90 and then go to another doc and get a script then go to the dentist while you hit different pharmacies.
not happening
gone are the days of partial fills. electronic scripts. refills.
the er will give you 3 pills i think now

random pill counts
random drug tests

plus as of the first of the year the laws all changed.
'they'(whoever they are) have stipulated that a person should be in a range based on what their diagnosis is.

i know this because i was taking 120 milligrams of prescribed roxicodone a day.

well as of the first based on my diagnosis i am allowed to have 30 milligrams of hydrocodone a day. i keep myself at 20 but i am allowed 30

my doc used to write scripts for ativan for me too. as of the first she can not do that anymore

the problem is getting better because it is forced but there is still a problem
we keep hearing about the illicit fentanyl from the middle east and yes it does happen but the big problem is people selling their prescriptions and people getting pills sent in or bringing them in from another country.

it is not as hard as you think.
they show up right to your door via usps.

thanks mr postman


I agree. It is a lot better now than it was. It just occurred to me that at my height of using 6-7 years ago I was going through 3 people's entire script every month. Sitting where I am now, that seems insane to me.

It's not really possible to have a habit like that with pharms these days, unless you have a prescription or are insanely rich. Which is why heroin is such a huge thing now.

I've always thought if people want to get really conspiracy minded about the influx of fentanyl and the problem it's causing in our country, then why is no one talking about the Chinese problem? The majority of illegal fentanyl coming into our country is made in Chinese labs. And these aren't hidden out in the woods meth lab type labs.

These are gigantic, well established labs that couldn't hide from the Chinese government. What if there's a behind the scenes global conspiracy to destabilize America between our enemies? Russia to use their propaganda techniques to make us distrust each other, and China to flood us with cheap highly potent opioids? I'm just letting my mind wander down the rabbit hole, but still...

And in response to the last part of your post:

"I like the Fed Ex driver. Because he's a drug dealer, and he don't even know it."- Mitch Hedburg





posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:05 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

Recreational drug us vs addiction.


Take a look at the following characteristics of a recreational user and see if you fit the in this category.

A recreational drug user can easily say no to situations where drugs are offered to him. This is primarily because he or she sees the use of drugs and alcohol as potential problems that could ruin his life.
A recreational user generally has good relationships with family, friends and coworkers who are primarily non-users. He or she enjoys these relationships.
A recreational drug user doesn’t depend on the drug for personal power, such as he would never think of taking them for gaining extra confidence, for libido power or for hope.
They also rarely think about drugs and the next high during the day.
A casual substance user is wise with money, thinking twice about using hard-earned cash for drugs when other expenses are calling for the funds.


Drug users could find themselves in the situation where they have become an addicted user. Here are the characteristics of this type of user:

At this point, there’s been plenty of time to see that using drugs may be (falsely) connected with the illusion of more power in personal relationships, extra libido power or makes them in some way feel they are more joyful or have more hope.
An addicted drug user has a much more difficult time saying no to situations when they are offered drugs.
They are now more involved in new relationships with other users and are forsaking their non-drug user friends. Relationships are chaotic, both the new ones and the old ones.
An addict will have relationships that are going downhill fast, as arguments always seem to play a central role in the relationships.
An addict will choose to buy drugs at all costs.
Drugs and the next high are thought about all day long.


Not the source I was looking for but it's a good one I think.

A recreational user will not spend their cable bill money on drugs or booze. They don't spend their days waiting for their next high. They don't go to a bar or look for their dealer every Saturday night because they worked all week just to pay for the weekend. They don't drive an old junker because instead of making car payments, they spend their money partying.

I'm not a prude, but I have lost one wife and a few friends to addiction and know exactly what it is. There is nothing wrong with a drink or a high now and then and most people know that, but some simply can't control it. The next drink, the next high is the main goal.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Blaine91555

if you take pills without a prescription because you like the buzz then you are doing it for recreation.
that leads to a person becoming addicted

fact



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:08 PM
link   

originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Blaine91555

I think there were the segment who started out on unemployment after the last economic crash, and when unemployment went out a certain segment of them shopped for disability. Disability is likely to come with some sort of pain diagnosis which also comes with drugs.

One of the pitfalls of long-term unemployment is depression, and I think some of those who took the disability route also had some of those psychological issues and used their pain meds to self-medicate.

But I don't think that is nearly all of the problem we see or where it all got started.


Exactly my initial point. It's no accident use went up at the same time as the recession was upon us.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:10 PM
link   

originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: angeldoll

i dont care what people post as far as articles and stats as to how bad it is.
it is getting better. i know this for a fact.
i am 40 in march and i have been on some opiate(prescribed or recreation) since i was 21. i have talked about this before. it is disgusting but i bet i have taken 20,000 pills(just opiates) in my life.
from recreation only to prescribed only to prescribed and a little extra on the side.

gone are the days when you can go to the er and get a script of 90 and then go to another doc and get a script then go to the dentist while you hit different pharmacies.
not happening
gone are the days of partial fills. electronic scripts. refills.
the er will give you 3 pills i think now

random pill counts
random drug tests

plus as of the first of the year the laws all changed.
'they'(whoever they are) have stipulated that a person should be in a range based on what their diagnosis is.

i know this because i was taking 120 milligrams of prescribed roxicodone a day.

well as of the first based on my diagnosis i am allowed to have 30 milligrams of hydrocodone a day. i keep myself at 20 but i am allowed 30

my doc used to write scripts for ativan for me too. as of the first she can not do that anymore

the problem is getting better because it is forced but there is still a problem
we keep hearing about the illicit fentanyl from the middle east and yes it does happen but the big problem is people selling their prescriptions and people getting pills sent in or bringing them in from another country.

it is not as hard as you think.
they show up right to your door via usps.

thanks mr postman


Um, I don't think this is a good thing. Mr. Postman. No thanks.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:12 PM
link   
a reply to: underwerks

i think people either dont think about or dismiss how easy it is to get # sent right to your house.
yes illegal # comes from china and wherever else but the internet has given everyone a gateway an if you are so inclined it is very easy.

message boards are a doorway to this # and people dont even think about it

my wife posts on a couple craft boards. i post on a couple others
not really on this board cause we are all conspiracy theory freaks so we are not giving out our phone numbers and # but dude im telling you

my wife has made multiple friends on her boards and by extension me too.
we all talk on the phone. skype. letters.
some of these people live in california. some of these people live in europe. i have a buddy in south africa

ask and ye shall receive
read between the lines you now

you do not need to go to the silk road and do some bitcoin #

ask a friend
get a package
thanks internet



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:14 PM
link   

originally posted by: angeldoll

Um, I don't think this is a good thing. Mr. Postman. No thanks.


never said it was a good idea
just said it can happen and does happen far more than most people think
i said it was easy not a good idea

big difference

just trying to get all the facts out there since we are talking about it

in the news we hear illegal # from china. doctor shopping and such

we dont hear about people asking their friends to mail a package. i would go so far as to say that that is a bigger factor in people getting hooked on # than doctor shopping or china.

i have no proof of this. just a feeling



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:15 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

What I posted was the definition as it applies to addiction.


A recreational drug user can easily say no to situations where drugs are offered to him. This is primarily because he or she sees the use of drugs and alcohol as potential problems that could ruin his life.

A recreational user generally has good relationships with family, friends and coworkers who are primarily non-users. He or she enjoys these relationships.

A recreational drug user doesn’t depend on the drug for personal power, such as he would never think of taking them for gaining extra confidence, for libido power or for hope.

They also rarely think about drugs and the next high during the day.

A casual substance user is wise with money, thinking twice about using hard-earned cash for drugs when other expenses are calling for the funds.


That matches my definition and jives with personal experience having had a marriage destroyed by it and having seen close friends kill themselves with it.

The problem is that people remain oblivious to their own addiction until they hit bottom.

More to the topic here though, addiction also comes from people trying to feel better. I don't mean fight pain, they emotionally feel bad or depressed and are trying to deal with it by self medicating. Financial circumstances can lead to it and hard economic times are a part of that.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: Blaine91555

More to the topic here though, addiction also comes from people trying to feel better. I don't mean fight pain, they emotionally feel bad or depressed and are trying to deal with it by self medicating. Financial circumstances can lead to it and hard economic times are a part of that.


oh 100% agree but lets be fair. it is not just opiates
people will self medicate with whatever they can get their hands on

i think we are on the same page with recreation vs addiction we are just not communicating it right
not everyone is an addict
some people take pills for recreation
some people that take them for recreation get addicted

some people take them for recreation and never get addicted
some people dont take them for recreation and get addicted

do you agree with any of that?



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: angeldoll
The "government" needs to keep their butts out of medicine


Except when it comes time to pay the bill, right?



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:01 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

Yeah, we are pretty much on the same page.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:12 PM
link   
it sounds cold and heartless, but we can blame the user's inability to deal with pain and pain medication as the leading cause of the opioid epidemic. I don't believe the government should intervene here.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:19 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

Your chart shows the rate of opiate related deaths tripling from 2000 to 2014. I can tell you that in my neck of the woods, it's gotten really bad.

In fact, in my own family (well my wife's) we had a death the year before last from an opiate OD. Earlier this year, a friend of mine of about 25 years overdosed and was discovered dead about two days later in his apartment.

He came from a very affluent family. Was a business owner pulling down in the mid six figures. Recently engaged. The last post of his on FB was him behind the wheel of a new Benz. By all outward signs, he was successful. But a couple years back he f'd up his foot and ankle, had a botched surgery that required two additional surgeries to repair. Then he was in chronic pain with pins in his foot and ended up developing a pill habit that he did a pretty good job of concealing.

Now he's dead.

Opiate addiction is a serious problem imo.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:35 PM
link   
Well.

What an interesting and varied group of replies.

Thanks all for your thoughts on the subject.




posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
it sounds cold and heartless, but we can blame the user's inability to deal with pain and pain medication as the leading cause of the opioid epidemic. I don't believe the government should intervene here.


not cold or heartless. just ignorant
some people can not manage their pain and/or meds. sure

others deal with extreme pain all the time and people that have never experienced chronic, extreme 24 hour pain can not begin to know what it is like. its just not possible.
imo you are right and wrong. it is not a simple issue and people not coping with extreme pain is nothing new.

people have been trying to manage their pain with pills since there have been pills. when there were no opiates it was lemons. before lemons it was booze. before booze it was laudanum. before laudanum it was opium. before that it was some other #.
as long as there has been pain there have been people struggling to manage it. some people succeed and some people fail.
just cause you can deal with this or that type of pain does not another can



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: burdman30ott6

originally posted by: angeldoll
The "government" needs to keep their butts out of medicine


Except when it comes time to pay the bill, right?


Absolutely. I said "medicine", not "accounts payable".



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:50 PM
link   

originally posted by: underwerks

"I like the Fed Ex driver. Because he's a drug dealer, and he don't even know it."- Mitch Hedburg



i didnt catch that the first time but he is right.
people would flip out if they knew how much # was in transit every day



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:56 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

You are absolutely right saying it's not a simple issue.

Where the real conspiracy comes in regards to the government is in not recognizing it's a mental health issue and not an issue of morality, by criminalizing behavior for which jail is the exact wrong answer for way too many years.

The addiction is a cry for help all too often that goes unheeded. Punishing people for something that has grown beyond their ability to control does not help them or fix anything.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:57 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy


Why now? Because sooner rather than later the POTUS will get in front of a camera (or type away at a keyboard hooked up w/Twitter™) that the U.S. will increase the monies stashed away and use it in Afghanistan... Too many folks are dying off using the crappy Fentanyl™ so the ones making $$$ in Afghanistan want more $$$ going their way.

Remember back when a guy who couldn't fly a Cessna™ took the controls of a commercial airliner and flew it into the Pentagon, the guys w/the indestructible passports, everything else blows up, I mean every thing, except the passports.
2001 it was, anyways, back then Afghanistan produced 7% of the world's opium, now it is closer to 90%, who woulda thunk that opium grew better w/gun powder??



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 05:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Blaine91555

That's true.

Telling people, forcing people not to indulge in an addiction will not solve the addiction.




top topics



 
28
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join