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An opioid named Squirrel

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posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:14 PM
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a reply to: Cypress

I don't buy into the paranoid idea that the medical and pharmaceutical industry are out to get us first of all.

If you disagree that people do drugs and get addicted because they are self medicating because they don't feel good, I'll have to say you are wrong. You don't get addicted because you drink or do drugs for recreation, you do so because there is a hole in your life you are trying to fill. Depression, chronic pain and other things lead to it. Mostly its psychological reasons.

You are right that socioeconomic levels play no role, although the experience is different for a poor person than for a person of means.

It's no accident that the rise in the numbers coincides with the recent recession and the number of people who no longer work and have given up. It plays a major role in this IMO.




posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:17 PM
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You asked what the distractions are for .

It seems to me that the 500 pound gorilla no one is talking about is China launching the " Petro yuan " in a few months . The potential ramifications for our economy and national security are significant.
Yet the major news sources don't even mention it .



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:22 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

The percentage of the population addicted to drugs is the same as it was 200 years ago.

But politics. And Trump. And misdirection.




posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: ausername
Having never abused them, I did not have any withdrawal.


Would you mind expanding on this statement?

At a quick glance, it seems to suggest that withdrawals only occur with abuse. While a patient who takes them as directed shouldn't experience withdrawals, that is a result of never taking them long enough to build physical dependency or never having to abruptly cease taking the medications.

Physical dependency occurs with continued use alone, irrespective of abuse. Its probably also good to make a distinction between "dependency" and "addiction."



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
You don't get addicted because you drink or do drugs for recreation,


100% wrong

do you really think that statement is true?

people absolutely can and do get hooked cause they do them for recreation.

you must not have thought that one through



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:32 PM
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originally posted by: Serdgiam

At a quick glance, it seems to suggest that withdrawals only occur with abuse. While a patient who takes them as directed shouldn't experience withdrawals, that is a result of never taking them long enough to build physical dependency or never having to abruptly cease taking the medications.

Physical dependency occurs with continued use alone, irrespective of abuse. Its probably also good to make a distinction between "dependency" and "addiction."


if you count coming off pills as directed them you are right you will not go through the withdrawals.
first what is long enough?
having said that i will use myself as an example.
after i cut my finger off i was taking 4, 30 milligram roxicodone a day. after a month i was most definitely hooked so what is long enough?

now i dont take more than 20 milligrams a day of hydrocodone and there is no physical dependency.

in a perfect world when a person gets off pills they can ween themselves down and be fine but it does not always work that way.

have gone in to get my script filled before and the pharmacy did not have enough to fill and since they do not do partial fills anymore i was #ed. go in on a thursday and they tell you they cant fill you till monday.
i will tell you if you have been on anything higher than 20 milligrams a day for more than about 3 weeks you will be going through some mad #in withdrawals.

or what about when you go in to get your next script and they tell you all of a sudden you need a prior authorization? that happens.

my doc is only in the office 3 hours a day, 4 days a week. it takes time to get that authorization. now i am #ed.

there are so many variables that people do not think of.
by far the most important thing is to take them as prescribed and to ween off.
people dont always take them as prescribed.
some people take more cause they like to get looped out
some people are in #ing pain and you will do anything for relief.

imo people that have not been on opiates, dealing with traumatic injury or chronic injury, dealing with doctors and insurance should not even have an opinion on this issue because reading news articles and catching sound bites in the news dont tell you # about how it really is.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:34 PM
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The "government" needs to keep their butts out of medicine and doctor/patient relationships. First they freak out because people are in pain in hospitals, so they start handing out painkillers like m&m's. Then they freak out because of addictions, so they put doctors and patients in a bad spot, and tell folks too bad. No more.

So since many of them can't get their usual painkillers anymore, because big brother is watching the doctors, they turn to heroin and fentanyl.

Oxycodone got into trouble when they marketed it, because they knew how addictive it was, but neglected to mention it, until it was too late.

It's a mess. As per the actual topic, I'm not sure about this as a distraction. The candidates were all talking about this problem before the election.

Maybe fentanyl should only be for hospital use. But I do believe the government is responsible for a lot of this mess, because they over-reached into medicine.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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and one more thing about you dont get addicted cause you take the for recreation...

some people do prefer opiate buzzes to booze or grass.
i do
you dont really realize how hooked you are on them until you dont have it.

if youre scoring a couple 30's a day for #s and gigs and you do that for a few weeks straight then yeah. you are hooked

there was a dude that worked with me that used to #ing crush roxi's up in the bathroom and rail them off the toilet paper holder in the stall and then come out #in jacked with his eyes all pinned and go on about his day.
he went in there a few times a day to bump off.

so yeah it absolutely does happen.
including myself i can think of quite a lot of people that have gotten hooked on pills in doing them for recreation

so yeah



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

Perhaps your definition and mine are different on the word recreation?

People who binge are also considered addicts. There are lots of working addicts and alcoholics. They don't consider themselves addicts and say they use recreationally, but it's not true. It has negative consequences on their lives even if it's not as visible as the guy with "I can't lie I need a drink" sign.

People who party (binge) every weekend are addicts. People who stay sober long enough to get through work and then chug a bottle after getting home every night are addicted.

People don't get addicted on purpose and denial is a universal thing. People often don't realize as they rant about how their doctor cut them off from opioids and go doctor shopping, calling it finding a better doctor, that they are addicted. When they start getting angry because the doctor won't give them more or stronger doses and blame it on the doctor, they are addicted. When they drink a bottle of expensive wine every night in the same way a homeless person downs a bottle of cheap wine every day they are just as addicted.

There are many maintenance drinkers and drug users in full denial, who call others addicts and are blind to their own addiction.

We are not really disagreeing, just defining a word a bit differently I think.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Blaine is a pain.

Don't harsh my high bro.


(*This message brought to you by North Central Positronics)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: angeldoll

i dont care what people post as far as articles and stats as to how bad it is.
it is getting better. i know this for a fact.
i am 40 in march and i have been on some opiate(prescribed or recreation) since i was 21. i have talked about this before. it is disgusting but i bet i have taken 20,000 pills(just opiates) in my life.
from recreation only to prescribed only to prescribed and a little extra on the side.

gone are the days when you can go to the er and get a script of 90 and then go to another doc and get a script then go to the dentist while you hit different pharmacies.
not happening
gone are the days of partial fills. electronic scripts. refills.
the er will give you 3 pills i think now

random pill counts
random drug tests

plus as of the first of the year the laws all changed.
'they'(whoever they are) have stipulated that a person should be in a range based on what their diagnosis is.

i know this because i was taking 120 milligrams of prescribed roxicodone a day.

well as of the first based on my diagnosis i am allowed to have 30 milligrams of hydrocodone a day. i keep myself at 20 but i am allowed 30

my doc used to write scripts for ativan for me too. as of the first she can not do that anymore

the problem is getting better because it is forced but there is still a problem
we keep hearing about the illicit fentanyl from the middle east and yes it does happen but the big problem is people selling their prescriptions and people getting pills sent in or bringing them in from another country.

it is not as hard as you think.
they show up right to your door via usps.

thanks mr postman



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Beezer...I honestly don't know if you are trolling us or not...

How many opiates did you take before you typed up this deflection meant to hide the fact that your beloved military is partly to blame for this increase in overdose deaths among Americans?

Sure it's always been bad, but unless you live in bum fart Arkansas (I bet they have the problem too) people are dying due to Fentanyl on a daily basis! WTF were you thinking when you wrote this thread?

Why the push now???

Because people are dying at a never seen before alarming rate!!

Where is the link to those stats in your OP?

I am willing to bet that the rise in synthetic overdoses is through the roof compared to that graph. I will gladly admit I am wrong if proven so. I will try and get more accurate statistics as yours are obviously bunk.

Ignorance at it's finest....



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:49 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

i agree with a lot of what you said but the definition is not really up for debate is it?
how can it be?

if you dont have a prescription and you take the pills because you like the buzz then you take them for recreation. what other definition is there?

are you not reading the # i post though?
for the most part doctor shopping is gone.
why?

cause your family doc, dentist, er doc can not write scripts for this #.
you have to sign a contract. you have to use the same pharmacy. you have to get random pill counts. you have to get random drug tests.
of course it still happens but on a very small scale compared to what it used to be like


and lets just get it out there that people like to catch a #in buzz. always have and always will.
if people could legally buy marijuana and not have to worry about going to jail or losing their job you would see a #in drastic decrease in opiate use.
100% fact
i cant give you proof in articles and news links
i know what i know cause i have been around both for 20 years. it is not something i can prove. it is just something i know



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:50 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

I think there were the segment who started out on unemployment after the last economic crash, and when unemployment went out a certain segment of them shopped for disability. Disability is likely to come with some sort of pain diagnosis which also comes with drugs.

One of the pitfalls of long-term unemployment is depression, and I think some of those who took the disability route also had some of those psychological issues and used their pain meds to self-medicate.

But I don't think that is nearly all of the problem we see or where it all got started.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: Serdgiam

I took what was prescribed exactly as prescribed and when I decided to deal with pain in other ways and quit them, I had no withdrawal symptoms.

I did not keep asking for more pills or stronger ones and if I had I'd suspect I'd have become addicted. I took just enough to remain functional. The pain had reached the level I could not concentrate to work.

Oddly though I admit, I don't like how pain killers make me feel. There is no pleasant high or euphoria for me, but they do help with pain.

Last year I had multiple major surgeries, meaning the morphine button was there to use. I used it so little it was noticed and a couple of times a doctor commented on why did I not push that button more often. I explained I don't like how it makes me feel and got the that's very strange look in return. Perhaps I'm odd?

Maybe it's I don't have an addictive personality? I never got hooked on alcohol and drink rarely and not much when I do. I admit I partied to fit in when young and all that went with that in the late 60's and into the 70's. I outgrew it quickly though and lost my taste for it. I noticed so did most of my peers and the few who did not outgrow it ended up having major issues in their lives.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:53 PM
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a reply to: TinySickTears

"What is long enough to build physical dependency" will be partially affected by individual chemistry. But, generally I'd say that ~15mg of oxycodone/day for 7-10 days will be enough to establish enough dependency to experience some discomfort with abrupt cessation.

There are a few things that can help though, like ondansetron. Its actually all very interesting to me.

Anyway, with all the hurdles and brick walls that have been put up, and probably will continue to be put up, difficulties like you experienced are going to become more and more common in my opinion. And, as I'm sure you know, there is little (if any) empathy beyond "deal with it." And yet, it all will continue to have very little meaningful impact on illicit use.

I think most are simply accustomed to a normal healing cycle. I'm not sure anyone can truly understand the life-altering repercussions when that cycle doesn't happen, without first hand experience. Its a completely foreign concept to most, which should certainly be appreciated.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:54 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555

Oddly though I admit, I don't like how pain killers make me feel. There is no pleasant high or euphoria for me, but they do help with pain.



and that is a major reason why right there

see i think the buzz is awesome and prefer it to other stuff. couple that with a disc replacement at 21 and losing my finger in a saw 5 years ago and that is a rough spot to be in

good on you though man

it can be a monster



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: Serdgiam
a reply to: TinySickTears

"What is long enough to build physical dependency" will be partially affected by individual chemistry. But, generally I'd say that ~15mg of oxycodone/day for 7-10 days will be enough to establish enough dependency to experience some discomfort with abrupt cessation.

.


i say you are in the ballpark for most people
i take 20 milligrams hydrocodone every day and there is no physical dependency.

i will say this and i have said it before. while there is no physical dependency(meaning i can come off right now and not be sick and #ed up) it is still there because i do look forward to 7 am when i allow myself to take a pill. then i look forward to 12:30 when i allow myself the other.
after that i dont really think about it until the evening when the thought pops in my head that in x hours i can take a pill. there is a dependency there but it is not a physical thing. it is different.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

You and I must be similar on that score.

I only asked for pain meds once or twice after my C section, and they had to make my go back to lay down once I started walking around the hospital. They started to get suspicious, but it really only hurt when I got up or lay down and not any other time.

I told them I'd been an athlete, and they accepted that, but it made me wonder what other people consider true pain if they're used to people needing meds all the time. I think I used the meds they sent home with me once or twice post-op.

I don't understand how people get hooked on them. They really don't do much more than make me drowsy, assuming they even do that much because I've had so many early on that I'm tolerant to quite a few of them.
edit on 26-10-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 04:04 PM
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I'm just so grateful that we have fearless leaders in high levels of government that continue to go after and slander potheads




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