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An opioid named Squirrel

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posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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Drugs are bad. M'kay?

Overdose deaths are bad. They are terrible. Drug abuse devastates people, families, people lose jobs, their families, their lives.

This is not new.


But for some reason, I'm seeing a big push about this now.

WHY?


I put this in the 'Pit because I think we're being played. This isn't a kind thread to Trump because I want to know why we're being distracted. And I think it is a distraction.

I see politicians talking a lot, probably calling for a raise in taxes to "fight the opioid crisis".

But I don't think it'll make a difference until people want to get off whatever they're on.

Drug problems are a serious issue, but this isn't new.

As the above chart shows, it's been going on for quite some time.

So I see this as a "squirrel" moment to distract us from something else.

Have to go out for a bit, but please comment if you so choose so. I think I've already laid out my opinion fairly well, but would like to hear yours.




posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy


I have to agree with you. Stopping the fentanyl from coming in from China would be a good thing IMO, but yea something is going on.....Guess we will have to wait for the solutions and follow the money. Bain Capital made a big investment in methadone clinics awhile back, sooooooooooooooooo......



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I agree, something is way off.

Sandy hook files, check.

Jfk files, check.

Paddock conspiracy, check.


Something (other then my upper lip) stinks.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

The rise is interesting, but I'm not so sure your on the right path with this. This may be due to more of a social issue. Granted, government action and inaction may play a role, but I'm not seeing it as a distraction from anything else.

People get started on the path to addiction because they feel bad and they are self medicating to feel better. The key is in what's making more people go down this path?

Over the last ten years we've seen less and less of the working age people in the country actually working and for so long they have fallen off the unemployment roles. They are still there though. Add to that young people who are having trouble getting started out of the gate who also are not really part of the statistic, but still there all the same. No reason to get out of bed in the morning, no goals, no real future in sight. Nothing but free time on their hands.

Older people have no route to get back into the workforce and often give up.

It's a perfect storm for addiction levels to rise. I think that may be closer to the truth than thinking somehow it's a distraction. I think it's more of a case of a problem that can no longer be ignored.

You might recall as the wall came down on the former USSR, one of the problems they were facing was alcoholism running rampant in their population for much the same reason.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

In my city - Thunder Bay Ont, we have 6 maybe 7 opioid dispensing clinics- methadone, and suboxone.
We have less than 90K people living here.
Every Main Street here has a methadone clinic on it.
The doctors here were told to push oxy's by pharma.
So they did. In its wake is left a city that deals with an overdose every 6 hours.
Every 6 hours for a city under 100k population! It's sickening.
You see these people walking around like the dead.
Literally Laying in the streets waiting for the clinic opens to get their fix.

Myself, I'm on suboxone. And have been for the past 4 years or so now.
I got myself addicted to pain killers that I was prescribed by my family dr.

The new fad here is fentanyl.
Everything is all about fentanyl now.
The deals are even pressing the stuff to look like oxys to sell.
In Canada there was an over dose death every 6-8 hours on fentanyl alone.
The Opioid addiction started with Purdue pharma. Claiming their pills were not addictive, so naturally doctors would prescribe them like candy....and get major kick backs for doing so.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:25 PM
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Prescription opioid addiction solution begins and ends with doctors and pharmacists management of the prescription drugs.

It doesn't need to get any more complicated than that.

They hand this # out like Halloween candy with unlimited supplies.


+6 more 
posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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The timing falls exactly with returning vets from Afghanistan and Iraq.
We protect the poppy fields ensuring a steady flow of heroin to the West.
Wounded vets come back hooked on pain meds.
The Feds have created a perfect storm of pain and drugs.

In my state doctors are being forced by regulators to reduce every pain patient's medications.
I know this as fact.
They will be reviewed by a board and if they find them guilty of over-prescribing they lose their license to practice.
My doctor is scared ____less, I've known him for 8 years.
edit on 26-10-2017 by Asktheanimals because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I have a friend who was painting his home and fell off the ladder landing face first on the concrete driveway, and because of such is in a state of chronic pain from the broken neck and back he suffered.
He has been on pain killers for YEARS now.
Just this year he had to sign a waiver and submit to random drug tests to be able to be prescribed pain meds for his neck and back pain.
To me it looks like another avenue for the govt to control people.
www.drugabuse.gov...
The link is to sample patient "agreements".



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: ausername

It's far more complicated than just that. The addicts play a role in becoming addicted in the first place and to shift blame off of them is just not honest. Blaming it on everyone else is called denial and it's one of the phases of addiction that is well known.

Opioids are not that easy to get for starters. People start out by lying to a doctor when they discover they like them. They go doctor shopping and do things like study up on what symptoms they have to fake or exaggerate to get them. When that no longer works they go to the streets for their fix.

All addicts until they hit bottom and are ready to deal with their addiction, blame it on others.

Some doctors may share blame, but for the most part doctors are just trying to help people in pain.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

First off, i'm neither white nor black, but I think it is a race issue. White kids are dying. A lot of white kids. Sure some blacks kids too, but a lot of white kids in numbers that have never been seen before. The numbers are growing to a point where some morgues can't hold all the bodies and have to get refrigerated trucks. Maybe some of the numbers have hit people in high places and their families.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Blaine91555

Over a year ago I had surgery, and obviously needed pain meds, opioid of course. I was given a strong one, after weeks I didn't think I needed them anymore, and flushed them. I had refills, and twice after that the doctor's office called to ask if I needed more refills.

It seemed to me, and I might be wrong, like they wanted me to get addicted to it.

I think the pharmaceutical companies use incentives somehow to do this in many cases.

imo



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:51 PM
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we won that war on drugs yet? le sigh

Squirrel ... I approve



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:55 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Evil big pharma and another route to socialize medicine? They may not be able to directly control the doctors, but maybe they can use this as a wedge to take control of pharma.
edit on 26-10-2017 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: ausername

I've never had that happen, and aside from when I had migraine prescriptions, I've never received a pain prescription with a refill.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

I'm completely convinced there is something obscure going on. Like with so many things, they use people's emotions and "good intentions" to motivate things.

Legitimate patients, such as myself and my now deceased father, have found it more and more difficult (significantly) to receive proper pain management.

Yet, it seems "illicit" use is going strong as ever. A part of me thinks that the idea is to get legitimate and not-so-legitimate patients to turn to the black market, perhaps even heroin. But, I don't think that completely adds up either.

What I do know is that people have continued to cheer on and support measures that hit patients in severe pain more than anyone else. Many still seem to be operating under assumptions formed years ago as well (like doctors "handing out meds like candy"), rather than an accurate assessment of the current situation.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

Considering this is a self correcting problem, I share your confusion as to why now and why such a massive push.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: Blaine91555
a reply to: DBCowboy

The rise is interesting, but I'm not so sure your on the right path with this. This may be due to more of a social issue. Granted, government action and inaction may play a role, but I'm not seeing it as a distraction from anything else.

The problem is that heroin is a cheap high combined with the fact we use opioids as a legal pain killer in our health care system making people already introduce or susceptible to becoming addicted.



People get started on the path to addiction because they feel bad and they are self medicating to feel better. The key is in what's making more people go down this path?

Disagree. Obviously some people get into it to self medicate or in a newer train of thought - deal with past trauma experiences; however, a majority don’t. The issue right now is that heroin costs a fraction of what weed does. So it’s cheap and highly addictive. So addictive to the point that the anti-od drugs are actually given away to new customers by the dealers. The reason being once you start you are going to be hooked and you don’t want your consumer base to die off right away. Also, you never fully recover from the addiction. It’s a battle everyday.



Over the last ten years we've seen less and less of the working age people in the country actually working and for so long they have fallen off the unemployment roles. They are still there though. Add to that young people who are having trouble getting started out of the gate who also are not really part of the statistic, but still there all the same. No reason to get out of bed in the morning, no goals, no real future in sight. Nothing but free time on their hands.

Heroin addiction is hitting every socio-economic level. Especially high risk populations



It's a perfect storm for addiction levels to rise. I think that may be closer to the truth than thinking somehow it's a distraction. I think it's more of a case of a problem that can no longer be ignored.

I agree to some extent here. Heroin is already a major issue.


You might recall as the wall came down on the former USSR, one of the problems they were facing was alcoholism running rampant in their population for much the same reason.

A better example would be the crack epidemic from the 80s only heroin dealers aren’t targeting low income minority based communities and clientele. Alcohol in many cases takes a much longer time to form dependacy even in those with predisposition towards it. Opioid addiction is a whole different beast.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:05 PM
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a reply to: ausername

That may be true in some cases, but mostly I think it's just doctors trying to help those in pain.

I'd imagine in many cases it starts with someone who has a genuine need, who after the need is gone keep finding ways to get them.

I was on low dosage pain med's for two years a few years back. I followed the instructions and never did get hooked on them and to be honest I don't experience the euphoria others seem to so quitting was as easy as telling my doctor I don't want them anymore and I stopped. Having never abused them, I did not have any withdrawal. Some can do that, but for others they seem to be easily hooked for whatever reason.

I think this is more complex than just placing blame on the medical community. People self medicate when the medication is not needed for a reason; they feel bad.

More to the topic of the OP. Like all issues in the limelight, politicians jump on it for votes. The end result will likely be that those who truly need them will no longer be able to get them by legal means and as always the innocent get punished for the actions of the guilty. The baby will be thrown out with the bathwater.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:06 PM
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originally posted by: burdman30ott6
a reply to: DBCowboy

Considering this is a self correcting problem, I share your confusion as to why now and why such a massive push.


Because it isn’t just affecting the low income communities. Heroin addiction is hitting the suburbs hard. Heroin is replacing weed as the starter drug of choice because it is so damn cheap.



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

As long as it isnt named crocodile.





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