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Astroid from outside the solar system, or something else?

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posted on Oct, 28 2017 @ 01:27 PM
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The mass, a quarter mile (400 meters) in diameter, quickly stood out for scientists because of its extreme orbit, coming from the direction of the constellation Lyra
www.telegraph.co.uk...


Lyra !


Curious how the mystery object came closest to Earth before returning wence it came , pretty sure it's not a probe from Alpha Centauri , unless it is.

Perhaps it's a scout for the inbound Mystery Comet heading our way.

edit on 28-10-2017 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 28 2017 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: intrptr


The angle of its dangle. I blame math and space cloverleaf freeway off-ramps, personally.



posted on Oct, 28 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: intrptr


The angle of its dangle. I blame math and space cloverleaf freeway off-ramps, personally.



Haha, nice reference to "Hitch Hikers Guide".



posted on Oct, 29 2017 @ 01:37 AM
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originally posted by: gortex

The mass, a quarter mile (400 meters) in diameter, quickly stood out for scientists because of its extreme orbit, coming from the direction of the constellation Lyra
www.telegraph.co.uk...


Lyra !

Just Prot making his interstellar rounds.




posted on Oct, 30 2017 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: MuonToGluon

How about this alternative: set instruments embedded within a large, high tensile strength net, and set the net in the path of the high speed object. Then *BAM* object hits the net, which wraps around it and adheres to the object, carrying the sensor package out of the solar system with it.

The problems I see: need a really tough, resilient net material, and really resilient to impact / stress sensor package.

But why could that not work, instead of trying to get up to speed to intercept an object like this?



posted on Nov, 1 2017 @ 01:14 PM
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Intriguing that the SETI Institute has shown considerable interest in this hyperbolic object, provisionally classed as an asteroid. The website of the Allen Telescope Array had reported their intention to observe it in the radio range 1 to 3 GigaHertz on October 30th. Now, it reports that they will observe it again, tonight.

Asteroids are not known for radio emissions. It appears that they are considering the possibility that the mysterious object is something else, altogether. Please find a link to the website, below:

www.setiquest.info...



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 10:57 PM
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This little visitor has caused the International Astronomical Union to do something significant: they introduced a new series of small-body designations for interstellar objects. www.minorplanetcenter.net...

Visiting interstellar objects will be named using the letter I (capital "i"), for "Interstellar".



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: Somekindofwizard

This is a nostalgic topic for me. When I was an undergraduate in my physics department I wrote a paper (just for school, not published) on cometary dynamics. I did a simulation of orbital motion and slingshots, learning how to integrate ODE's numerically. I simulated a distribution of incoming comets from the Oort cloud, which come in nearly exactly parabolically and looked at how their course was altered by planets (I think only Jupiter & Saturn really mattered). There was a certain flux of them which were ejected in hyperbolic orbits, i.e. escape velocity outside the solar system.

The problem was "well, where are the ejected comets from the other star systems around us." At that time, and until very recently, no hyperbolic incoming comets have ever been observed. I made some crude estimates of star and comet density and how many were ejected from Earth and came to the conclusion that an interstellar comet should have been observed already but wasn't and presented it as an unsolved mystery.

And now we have one.


edit: well crap. It's an asteroid, not a comet, but anyways, we are probably seeing the exhaust of another planetary system's slingshot.
edit on 17-11-2017 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 02:19 AM
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originally posted by: Alien Abduct
a reply to: intrptr

My guess is it might have something to do with speed. Other than that I have no idea how they could tell. I would love for them to get a sample of that thing if it is in fact interstellar though!



Yes, it's very clear from good old Newtonian dynamics that the incoming object has a significant velocity "originally" when at the edge of the solar system. Elliptical = lower energy, the orbits close to us, known periodic comets. Parabolic (medium energy) = on the edge, must have started out from extremely far away (compared to our regular comets, from Oort cloud). Hyperbolic = highest initial kinetic energy, shot into our solar system with a noticable velocity at the edge of the Oort cloud.

The Oort cloud is composed of zillions of quiet comets, but the cloud moves with center of mass of the Sun, so it's almost as if the comets just 'fall' in from very far away. But an object on a clear hyperbolic orbit means it was spewn out from another star system, probably from a gravitational nudge from the other system's astroid belt or oort cloud, and slingshot through a massive planet (we've discovered many big gas giants).
edit on 17-11-2017 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 18 2017 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: mbkennel Thanks for that detailed explanation, that really helped to clear things up for me.



posted on Nov, 19 2017 @ 02:38 AM
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So, what have we learned about this "guest" in meanwhile?

The object, known to astronomers as 1I/2017 U1, measures 180 meters by 30 meters. In shape, the object resembles a fat cigar, half a city block long, and rotates on an axis about once every eight hours. It also has a reddish tinge and a low albedo. news.wisc.edu...

Abe S. Shinnosuke posted an artistic rendering and rotating animation of 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua) on Twitter
twitter.com...



That's one funky object, I've never seen an asteroid like that!
edit on 19-11-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)

edit on 19-11-2017 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



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