It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

how long would it take you to run 238 miles?

page: 2
10
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: TinySickTears
a reply to: ketsuko

im no expert but i dont think anyone needs to eat # like nachos and candy to survive(or the stuff in it)
could be wrong. ive been wrong 2 other times


It's about the types of stuff in them and what the body uses to optimize performance. Some people really are super users of sugar and empty carbs.




posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

There are a couple of 30 for 30 episodes that are decent and touch on or are about doping. If I recall correctly, "Slaying the Badger" and "9.79". They may or may not still be up on Netflix. If interested. I haven't watched Icarus, but I've just started it.



ETA:

"Slaying the Badger"

Before Lance Armstrong, there was Greg LeMond, who is now the first and only American to win the Tour de France. In this engrossing documentary, LeMond looks back at the pivotal 1986 Tour and his increasingly vicious rivalry with friend, teammate and mentor Bernard Hinault. The reigning Tour champion and brutal competitor known as "The Badger," Hinault "promised" to help LeMond to his first victory, in return for LeMond supporting him in the previous year. But in a sport that purports to reward teamwork, it's really every man for himself.

www.espn.com...

"9.79"

In the history of the Olympics, there's never been a controversy quite like what ensued over the 100 meter race at Seoul in 1988. The match brought together Carl Lewis (USA) and Ben Johnson (Canada) who had been fierce competitors. Lewis was known as a savvy careerist who became an American hero at the previous Los Angeles Olympics. Johnson was his chief rival, considered an underdog due to his recovery from a pulled hamstring. In less than 10 seconds, Johnson edged out in front of Lewis to win the Seoul race. But that wasn't the end. Three days later, in a reversal of fortune, the Olympic committee announced that Johnson had failed a drug test, losing his medal to Lewis in disgrace. A mystery still shrouds the race. Was Johnson exceptional in his drug usage or merely the fall guy for a widespread practice? Six of the eight finalists in the 1988 race have since been implicated for drugs -- although some still deny any wrongdoing. Filmmaker Daniel Gordon, digs into the controversy, conducting extensive interviews with Lewis and Johnson as well as their competitors, coaches and Olympic insiders. He uncovers layers of intrigue, deception and favoritism that change our perception of the way this story has previously been told.

The Seoul race wound up being the world's wake-up call to drugs in sports. Now the problem runs rampant throughout professional and amateur athletics. As drug-testing gets more sophisticated, so do means of evading it. This powerful story forces us to question what we expect from our athletes as they pursue records in the name of national pride. This story from the past is vital to understanding the future of sports.

www.espn.com...

edit on 10-24-2017 by WakeUpBeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:35 PM
link   
a reply to: WakeUpBeer

Icarus will blow your hair back, man. I lost track of how many times I said something to the effect of "holy #" or "unbelievable" when I watched it.

I'll give those episodes a look, thanks for the info!



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6
I'll give those episodes a look, thanks for the info!


Likewise!



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:46 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

I had a friend who was attempting to summit McKinley at the same time this guy set his record...
www.climbing.com...
He said there was radio chatter from the rangers stationed at 1-2 mile intervals lower on the mountain. The first guy radioed that he thought he just saw a climber sprinting up the mountain, the other rangers made fun of him "been drinking?" "Do we need to spell you long enough to go to the eye doctor?" etc. Then about 30 minutes later the next ranger spotted the sprinter and the jokes stopped. For a point of reference, my friend is not a world class mountaineer, but he's climbed more than a few of them and it took him and his equally experienced climbing partner 18 days to make the ascent.

Some people are amazing.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 06:59 PM
link   
238 miles?

It would depend greatly on the size of the dog that is chasing me.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 07:37 PM
link   
Let's see, the word that bothers me is Run. I might be able to walk a hundred and fifty miles during a year.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 08:42 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

238 days, give or take.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 09:59 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

238 miles, I can't even run 238 feet!



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 10:24 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

I would die out of pure exhaustion after 4 miles.
What's sad, is a majority of it would be done walking it.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 10:25 PM
link   
a reply to: TinySickTears

I can run 27km in 2hr and 23 mins..... I could do the math, but 238 MILES! sounds #ing insane



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 11:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: mamabeth
a reply to: TinySickTears

238 miles, I can't even run 238 feet!


I'm completely with you on this. I never could run, I ran track and the doctors told my parents I had to quit after I had an incident. I have tachycardia. I can work eighty hours a week on construction, I can walk five miles no problem, but I cannot run very far.



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 06:44 AM
link   
Totally dependent on If I'm being chased by human or non-human......aint no way I'm running 238 miles unless I'm being chased.



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 06:59 AM
link   
Forever..



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 07:56 AM
link   
We have the South Downs challenge here in England. It is 100km (about 60 miles) and set up by a team of Gurkhas in the early 1980's. They have the record for 9 hours 27 minutes. If you scale that up to the length of this race, it would be 39 and a bit hours to complete.

I do believe it to be a fair comparison also as the Gurkhas did the South Downs Challenge with full military backpacks (which you would not have on this race).



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 10:30 AM
link   
a reply to: Aeshma
You do the math.You ran 27 kilometers , that's about 17 miles, in 2 hours 23 mins. That's average about 7 mph.
Now she "ran" 238 miles in 58 hours. that works out at around just over 4 mph. I would call that jogging.
But run or jog it's still amazing just for the stamina aspect.



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 02:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

Well worth the watch. I'm not sure how I missed that one.

Three words...

Sneaky *@#$^! Russsians!



edit on 10-25-2017 by WakeUpBeer because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 25 2017 @ 03:55 PM
link   
a reply to: crayzeed

I did the math as well, I was simply stating that i could do the math to figure out how long it would take me.... also that would be assuming i could run that long. I can't imagine running a distance greater than a marathon.... I mean 27 is a remarkable achievement for myself how ever it pales in comparison to ultra runners.

I did not mean to take away from the remarkable feat of stamina of this tremendous athlete. I respect runners to no end. It's as much a physical battle as it is mental, and I will tell you this 5, 10, 15 km is nothing if you can do it you can do it... once you start running a half a marathon and longer than that it's not just have you physically trained it's have you mentally trained. No matter how hard I have trained or how many km's i put in in the week i can't seem to push myself farther than that 21-27 mark. 27 is the farthest i have run, but it's not the only time i've run that distance. It's always my mind that stands in my way.

This athlete is truly super human and has my highest respect. Our bodies are amazing if we take care of them and understand our limits can be changed if done over time, while taking care of our whole system.
edit on PMAmerica/Chicago340410pm by Aeshma because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2017 @ 09:42 AM
link   
a reply to: Aeshma
Sorry if I seemed a bit terse, I don't mean to. I think I should have said not you Aeshma but everyone in general. And I also do not take away from her achievement as I would be lucky to run a mile not any great distance.




top topics



 
10
<< 1   >>

log in

join