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Einstein’s theory of happiness sold for $1.5m

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posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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The Nobel Prize-winning German-born physicist gave the notes to a courier in Tokyo in 1922 instead of a tip.

He told the messenger that if he was lucky, the notes would become valuable.

Einstein devoted his life to science but suggested in the notes that achieving a long-dreamt-of goal did not necessarily guarantee happiness.

When the courier came to his room to make a delivery, the physicist did not have any money to reward him.

He had at the time just heard that he had won the Nobel Prize for physics and was in Japan on a lecture tour.

Instead, he handed the messenger a signed note - using stationary of the Imperial Hotel Tokyo - with one sentence, written in German: "A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it."

A second note written at the same time simply reads: "Where there's a will, there's a way." It sold for $240,000, Winner's auction house said.

The first thing that came to my mind was, "I wish I had a million bucks spare to splurge on 2 pieces of paper".

Einstein was pretty great at making predictions, but did he really have the foresight to know his notes would one day be worth a LOT? Probably not, but still pretty cool nonetheless. Two very simple, yet profound sentiments that still resonates today, and probably more relevant than ever. So I guess this can serve as a positive reminder for those that need it.

Ignoring the colossal price tag, these are some pretty cool collectors items.



Some more quotable's from Einstein

We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.

The true sign of intelligence is not knowledge but imagination.

We still do not know one thousandth of one percent of what nature has revealed to us.

When you are courting a nice girl an hour seems like a second. When you sit on a red-hot cinder a second seems like an hour. That's relativity.


I must say, this Einstein guy was a pretty wise fellow.





posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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Here's another quote:

"Great spirits have always encountered violent opposition from mediocre minds."

I used to have that on a poster somewhere.

-dex



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:34 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986

"A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it."

Sounds like he got that from a fortune cookie.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986

No one's perfect but Einstein was pretty awesome man.

You know what this thread tells me?
That there is a ton of money to be made out there on the most simplest of things, all we gotta do is open our mind to the limitless business opportunities. Just imagine...



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
I must say, this Einstein guy was a pretty wise fellow.

Sure. Ask his illegitimate daughter.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:48 PM
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originally posted by: muzzleflash
You know what this thread tells me?
That there is a ton of money to be made out there on the most simplest of things, all we gotta do is open our mind to the limitless business opportunities. Just imagine...

Like all "collectibles," you just have to find a bigger idiot then yourself who will give you more money for the thing than you paid for it.

Personally, I think ideas aren't worth more just because they're on a piece of paper.
edit on 24-10-2017 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:51 PM
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1.5m on a piece of paper you will show your other rich pals? good for you European Bernie Madoff



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:54 PM
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originally posted by: Indigent
1.5m on a piece of paper you will show your other rich pals? good for you European Bernie Madoff

This was apparently Einstein's way of tipping people? What a cheapskate. I read somewhere that toward the end of his life Pablo Picasso would do that, too. Just scribble on a napkin whenever he wanted to pay for something. I don't think I could get away with it.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 04:57 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: Indigent
1.5m on a piece of paper you will show your other rich pals? good for you European Bernie Madoff

This was apparently Einstein's way of tipping people? What a cheapskate. I read somewhere that toward the end of his life Pablo Picasso would do that, too. Just scribble on a napkin whenever he wanted to pay for something. I don't think I could get away with it.


You're right.
Picasso did the same thing. A scrawl on a napkin would allow the owner to pay off the mortgage on his restaurant.
edit on 24-10-2017 by IAMTAT because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:05 PM
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originally posted by: IAMTAT
a reply to: knowledgehunter0986

"A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it."

Sounds like he got that from a fortune cookie.


Well he did just make somebody a fortune.




posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:07 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

I take it you are not very fond of the man.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:12 PM
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Im sensing some jealousy in this thread from people whom are perhaps bitter about about this theory.


Cool story. And hey this beats a couple dollars for a tip as does getting to pay off ones restaraunt mortgage.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: muzzleflash
You know what this thread tells me?
That there is a ton of money to be made out there on the most simplest of things, all we gotta do is open our mind to the limitless business opportunities. Just imagine...

Like all "collectibles," you just have to find a bigger idiot then yourself who will give you more money for the thing than you paid for it.

Personally, I think ideas aren't worth more just because they're on a piece of paper.


I agree.

But no one's forcing you to buy everything on the market either.
Buy what you wanna buy, but understand that others will buy what they wanna buy too.
Different people buy different things. Some people like to build their own museums.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift


Personally, I think ideas aren't worth more just because they're on a piece of paper.


Also you gotta think of this from the rational perspective.

If I want to make $$$ quickly and improve my life, it doesn't matter what I think things are worth.
It only matters what the market thinks they are worth, because that's who will be paying me.

My own opinions and likes / dislikes have no real place in the equation.
If I wanna make $$$, what matters are the opinions and likes/dislikes of the guy holding a wad of $$$.
My job is to convince him to hand me that $$$ legitimately.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
I take it you are not very fond of the man.

I'm not all that thrilled with the way he has been deified over time. He was a reasonably smart guy in his particular area of expertise. I don't think this means anybody should pay a quarter million dollars to buy a piece of paper where he scribbled, "Waste not, want not."
edit on 24-10-2017 by Blue Shift because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: knowledgehunter0986




"A calm and humble life will bring more happiness than the pursuit of success and the constant restlessness that comes with it."


I think you mean Einstein's clichés sold for 1.5 million.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

"Value" is pretty subjective. One man's trash is another man's treasure.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: muzzleflash
My job is to convince him to hand me that $$$ legitimately.

Agreed. That's why the Internet has pretty much killed the small collectibles market. If somebody really wants an old Einstein shoelace and is willing to pay millions for it, they can find it on the Internet and buy it. They win. End of the line. Anybody who isn't going to spend the millions for it but still might want it is SOL.



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Lol, I agree. But hey, there have been worse purchases I'm sure.

edit on 24-10-2017 by knowledgehunter0986 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2017 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: knowledgehunter0986
"Value" is pretty subjective. One man's trash is another man's treasure.

But we're talking about monetary value here, and that is definitely NOT subjective. There is an actual number associated with it. My worship of Einstein isn't going to help me buy that little piece of paper with his grocery list on it.



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