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Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms

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posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 01:53 PM
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A lot people are critical of the ACA but I don't think it's a bad bill. Yes, it raises taxes on the rich to help pay for a new social program for the poor. But having affordable health care saves money rather than people going to the emergency room for healthcare. Here's a new study on how people get healthcare in this county:

Nearly half of US medical care comes from emergency rooms



Nearly half of all US medical care is delivered by emergency departments, according to a new study. In recent years, the percentage of care delivered by emergency departments has grown. The paper highlights the major role played by emergency rooms in US health care.


The problem with getting healthcare through the emergency room is this is bad for several reasons. First, it's probably the most expense way to get healthcare in this country. I believe there is Pentagon level corruption going on here. The people who own the hospitals also own the healthcare insurance providers. So it is in the owner of the hospitals best interests to charge as much as possible. The insurance company just pasts the rising costs to the consumer. It's a never ending cycle of raising costs which continues to drive up the costs of healthcare premiums.

And second, the Emergency room is full of people who really should be getting basic healthcare from somewhere else a lot cheaper. People with real emergencies have to wait forever to get treated.

I have heard many people complain that the ACA is driving up rates. In my life experience since 1995 healthcare premiums have been rising 20% per year on average. Every five years my policy doubles in price. This was happening before ACA. And it is still happening today after the ACA went into effect. The ACA really did nothing to address the rising cost of healthcare premiums. I think the only way the rising cost of healthcare premiums will ever get under control is by the government taking drastic actions.

Now people who are freeloaders hate the ACA. Because now if you do not have healthcare insurance you have to pay a penalty on your taxes. Well, too bad for you! People going to the emergency room getting free healthcare are free loaders. Nothing is for free. Why should people who pay premiums have to cover the costs of freeloaders. Someone saying ACA made their healthcare costs goes up make me think of the time I heard someone from a red state say a "flat tax" is not fair because their taxes would go up!

The ACA also stops companies from dropping people with pre-existing conditions. If you have one, then you are in favor of the ACA. It's like my right wing neighbor across the street. He's an ultra conservative until his daughter turned out to be lesbian and now he's practically voting Democrat. And besides, Republicans should love the ACA because it is the Republican plan from the 90s.

At some point something has to be done about the rising cost of healthcare. I think the current levels of corruption are so over the top the government should just take over all of it. Get it sorted out with standards. And then sell of the pieces one at time with rules making sure people who own the healthcare administration companies do not have conflicting interest with healthcare delivery. We need open and free markets to wring out inefficiencies. With dual ownership of administration and delivery we just have way too many cartels and monopolies in this country gouging the consumer.

I like Bernie Sander's plan. Just change one line in Medicare making it available to 55 and over. At least a segment of the population will have good coverage. Of course, children's healthcare is important if you value such things over defense spending.


edit on 23-10-2017 by dfnj2015 because: (no reason given)



+15 more 
posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

You shoulda left the ACA commentary out. I've had my health care triple in cost. Im not rich. So ACA doesn't "tax the rich" to help the middle class. ACA pays for the poor on the backs of the middle class. The rich are unaffected, and the middle class are now poor. That is why ACA is a "bad bill".

More on topic, however...it would seem that if we could address the fact that a doctors office visit has gone from around $50 in 2000 to almost $200 today, before you have any kind of treatment provided, we could help the ER problem.

Its all simple math. The ER bill won't have to be paid...the doctor, on the other hand, won't see you without payment up front. And $150-$200....that is half a weeks work just to pay for 15 minutes to see a doctor?



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I don't know what healthcare you have but my deductible for going to the hospital is MUCH higher than going to a normal doctor.

The way insurance works is you have to have the biggest pools possible to keep the costs down for the everyone.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Huh, guess that makes me rich! Can't wait to inform my boss!!



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

One reason for increased ER visits has certainly been an overall reduction in doctors in many communities since the ACA started. We had a number of docs here that either retired or simply stopped accepting any insurance.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

Non insured payments is what im referring to.

If i have no insurance and am ill, i have 2 options:

- emergency room through a county hospital. The cost is outrageous (around $350 starting, just for a triage and a seat), but won't have to be paid right then, meaning its effectively free (yet shoddy) healthcare.

- a physician. Cost is between $150-$200, and has to be paid before I can see him

The ER is "the doctor" for people who cannot afford healthcare insurance.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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a reply to: dfnj2015

I wish more people would attempt to understand this. Preventative care is so so so so so so much cheaper than emergency care. This is literally true for anything in existence. Especially your health though.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:09 PM
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Too many people go to the emergency room for non threatening illnesses. I have been hearing a lot of people going there for the flu, mostly the kids of people the age of my daughters. They won't just wait a day and go to the doctor or to the outpatient clinic, both of which are way cheaper. This also causes problems with real emergencies.

I think we need to expand the outpatient clinics to keep costs down. Also, regular doctors seem to be three days out, why is that? I think it is because they are having people come in for yearly and bi-yearly exams and scheduling a lot more appointments than necessary. I know they have to support their workers and pay their insurances, but too much is too much.

I have always been told to come back in a week to follow up when I went in there. There is no way I would go back if I was better, I didn't even make an appointment before leaving, saying I needed to check my schedule and I'd call. If I wasn't better, I would go back. That was rare. But evidently from what I hear, lots of people go back even if they are better, then that books up the doctor and nobody can get in if they have the flu.

The best place to catch something is at the doctors, I do not go unless I have a real need.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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It's getting hard to find primary-care doctors. These days most doctors specialize. I've heard that it's mostly because the cost of a medical education is so astronomically high, it almost doesn't pay to be a general practitioner.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: dfnj2015
The ER is "the doctor" for people who cannot afford healthcare insurance.

This is why we need universal healthcare. This is not a fiscally sustainable health care treatment option for our society.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: dfnj2015

I wish more people would attempt to understand this. Preventative care is so so so so so so much cheaper than emergency care. This is literally true for anything in existence. Especially your health though.


But preventive care is making it impossible for sick people to get an appointment with their doctor when they are sick. You need to wait so long you go to the outpatient clinic or emergency room. A doctor can only see so many people in a day, scheduling appointments when someone is not sick can make it so there is a wait for sick people.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:12 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

Doctor schedules are swamped these days. It's not unheard of for a doctor's schedule to be scheduled months in advance. There is a reason why that poor doctor on UA had to be dragged off the plane. Missing those appointments probably would have sent those patients' care into wack.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

That's an issue with a lack of doctors. There should be no reason we are discouraging preventative care.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

If someone making 38% more than minimum wage has to work half of a work week just to get 15 minutes with a doctor...its not too hard to see where the problem lies.

It would be ludicrous if I had to work a full 8 hours to pay for a doctors appointment...to have to put in 20 hours of work, just so the doctor can get their cut (and then offshore the cash back to India, further eroding our economy and available cash flow)...its criminal.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

You forget. As far as most people who want what things like the ACA promise them are concerned, if you had what they felt they wanted or needed, then you were "rich" and not "middle class."

There are only two classes in this mindset: haves - like you and I were - and have nots - everyone who now profits at our expense and thinks it's all fair.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

I don't know about that. I do know some areas have bad doctor shortages. We never have an issue getting in to see either our GP or another doc in his office on short notice if we need it.



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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I just read and wrote papers on both of these subjects and those with Medicaid and Obamacare, even after getting insurance still don't got to the doctor only the emergency room.
On just expanding Medicare to 55 and older, it'd be too expensive. Currently the avg Medicare patient only plays 70k into the program throughout their lifetime but uses over 190k in services
edit on 23-10-2017 by avgguy because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:20 PM
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As a person who literally as of friday spent his night in the emergency room, I can tell you this -- it's really not all that expensive for most people. They gave me 88% off. Turns out it's cheaper to just use the E.R. than to pay monthly/annuals, especially when I only need to go in once every ten years or so.

Oh and yeah, when I had ACA [cuz I had it for a short time] I tried to use it and couldn't for 90 days. The only doctor that accepted it in my area was booked for 3 solid months. I'd have been not sick anymore, or dead by the time I saw the doc. A whole lot of good ACA did me, eh?
edit on 23-10-2017 by SRPrime because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:22 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Krazysh0t

If someone making 38% more than minimum wage has to work half of a work week just to get 15 minutes with a doctor...its not too hard to see where the problem lies.

It would be ludicrous if I had to work a full 8 hours to pay for a doctors appointment...to have to put in 20 hours of work, just so the doctor can get their cut (and then offshore the cash back to India, further eroding our economy and available cash flow)...its criminal.


It might seem like a daft question from a Brit but when you say it costs to see the doctor is it a set fee or is it less or more depending?

To clarify I had some blood tests at the doctors but I called the NHS hotline and discussed my symptoms and then they booked an apointment at the doctors but with a nurse who took the blood, she then sent them of for tests and I had a telephone conversation with the doctor when all the basic stuff was out of the way and he had all the info to hand.

Would this happen with you for a lesser fee as nurses and phonecalls cost less than a full doctor or is it a flat fee?



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: SRPrime

In 2007 I was in a car accident where the car flipped onto its roof and spun in a circle. I was hanging out the rear of the window and had my hand cut up all sorts of nasty and had to get a skin graft. I spent a week in the hospital and had 2 surgeries on my hand before starting physical therapy. This was before I had health insurance. All told it cost me $30,000. Luckily I was able to get the money from a lawsuit, but still that ain't cheap...




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