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Camera opinions needed

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posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 11:23 AM
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The family is planning a trip to Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon for next summer. We usually use our smartphones for pictures but they are very limited for scenery shots.
Point and shoots just don't cut it either.
I want to be able to use a telescopic lense to reach out and touch someone.
Obviously this will be used for many years for family portrait type shots and future vacations.
I'm not looking to publish in national geographic so I don't want to spend $5k.

Anybody have some experience with cameras in the $500-$800 dollar range?
I have found a few kits online like a canon EOS 1200D and Nikon D3400 in that price range.

I have bought cameras in the past, mostly the point and shoot types with hundreds of functions and end up using about six of them so all the bells and whistles are a waste for me.

Any thoughts ATS?




posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I basically use still cameras to take video but the panasonic G7 is inexpensive, shoots 4k, beautiful low light capabilities and makes beautiful images.

I use my canon glass with adapters. Seldom use my Canon 60D...to heavy.



edit on 22-10-2017 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 11:38 AM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Just my opinion here but gained after years of experience..

Nikon's are my go too for Crime Scene and back when I did weddings and portrait photos... They are better at skin tones..

I use Canons for all outdoor and scenery as I find it better for greens and blues..

I have the T3i and love it. Not that expensive and very versatile.. The 70-300mm lens it great for zooming as well..

Have fun




posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22



Best camera I bought in july. Taken over 7000 pictures on one card. $800.00

Video too in high definition.


Edit: purchased on best buy, used my points. Knocked the price down to $360.00 .
Came with 2 lenses. 75-300 mm and a smaller lens.

edit on 22-10-2017 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 12:17 PM
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If you are getting a DSLR then make sure you know how to use it.

There is no point in my view in getting a DSLR if you are going to stick it into manual mode because then you have just spend hundreds of dollars on a glorified point and shoot camera. If you don't about proper exposure its pointless and it takes a while to learn it properly. You can still take really good photos with a point and shoot or even a phone. So first you need to ask if you really need the DSLR

Most kit lenses are pretty crap, your best bet it so get a trusty 35mm prime lense Imo, they are cheap, sharp and really good for learning. However if you buy a DSLR before you know it you will want more kit and that costs more money then you will be wanting editing software, then a decent computer to edit on. For a bit of reach that won't cost you thousands then a 55-300 lense could be a good option

Its something you need to really think about it.

the D3400 is a good camera, but I am a Nikon guy, never used a cannon.
edit on 22-10-2017 by OtherSideOfTheCoin because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22


Anybody have some experience with cameras in the $500-$800 dollar range?


As for a DSLR: I have a Canon 60D. While not a full-frame sensor like the 5D, it takes exceptional photos, as well as HD video, and accepts a wide variety of Canon's EF lenses. It's almost identical to the 7D, which had an additional processor.

I bought mine mainly for its video capability with manual controls, but it's an awesome camera for the price I paid, which was around 7-800 at the time.



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 12:43 PM
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Canon. I used mine in Alaska ALOT....
edit on 22-10-2017 by Plotus because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 01:47 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22

The family is planning a trip to Yellowstone and the Grand Canyon for next summer. We usually use our smartphones for pictures but they are very limited for scenery shots.
Point and shoots just don't cut it either.
I want to be able to use a telescopic lense to reach out and touch someone.
Obviously this will be used for many years for family portrait type shots and future vacations.
I'm not looking to publish in national geographic so I don't want to spend $5k.

Anybody have some experience with cameras in the $500-$800 dollar range?
I have found a few kits online like a canon EOS 1200D and Nikon D3400 in that price range.

I have bought cameras in the past, mostly the point and shoot types with hundreds of functions and end up using about six of them so all the bells and whistles are a waste for me.

Any thoughts ATS?

First you should know what you plan on shooting, landscapes, people, bugs, plants, or wildlife. People usually want to shoot whatever it is that is in front of them, I know I do. =)

My first digital camera was a Nikon 990 back in around 1999, I was a Canon 35mm user before that though, I held no real allegiance to Canon, although, they are the ones that broke the $1,000 DSLR price so 'normal' people could afford a good digital camera. So, I went with Canon again and I don't have any regrets. I will say that now days almost any brand will give very good results, the thing is to know what lens to get, lenses can cost quite a bit if you get serious.

I mainly shoot wildlife, I get exercise and enjoy being out looking for surprises, I'm in Texas so we don't get some of the cooler critters that those up north might. To shoot wildlife and if one is fairly serious it takes a good lens, if you have a fairly decent camera and put a good lens on you can get some really excellent results.
My first DSLR Canon was a 450D (XSi), it cost me around $1,000 and I bought a Canon 100-400mm L zoom lens that sold new for about $1,600. or so, that gave me the reach to shoot birds AND stuff that was far and near. A zoom lens is what I would definitely recommend for your first lens, you can also buy a Canon wide-angle zoom for under $100. too that will do you a lot of good. I had the Canon 18-55mm kit lens, I have had several of them in the past years and I actually liked them so much that I still use that same lens although the newest version. Some kit lenses are really crap, some are not.
For instance, a Canon 50mm f/1.8 kit lens known for its quality even though they are a cheap-o lens. Perfect for starting out.
Personally, I would go for the Canon 55-250mm zoom lens to go with that 50mm, this is a really good quality kit lens that can get some good shots.
Of course, later on as you get a good feel for your equipment you will read about and hear about other lenses and cameras, but then you will have more knowledge about DSLR's and you won't have to ask, you can choose what you feel is best for you. Almost ALL photographers go through this, its just a part of growing.

You can buy used equipment on Craigslist, or on a camera forum, I do both, I rarely buy new. The reason is that some stuff costs more than the average person wants to spend.
My first camera the 450D I had the 55-250mm lens and I used that almost exclusively, then I realized that it wasn't enough reach and I could not get the wildlife that I was after the way I had pictured. New they cost a total of $1,150 or so, not including tax. That was then though...
Now you can buy that same camera (not that I would) for $250. and the lens for $100.-$150., some people try to sell that lens for more than it is worth, the market is flooded with 'em.
So for cheap you could go that route.
Personally, (see the link below) I'd go to a forum and join so you can see what others use and do with their equipment, looking at their EXIF (camera information) you will be able to tell what camera they used for that shot, what lens, what settings they used, etc. It's a very good way to learn, then as you get more familiar with things in general you can go and seek out places like YouTube and any other places online that will further your hobby.

As what was said earlier the Canon T2i on up with get you very good results, the T2i allowed me to get some really good results on a budget. I paired that with my Canon 100-400mm zoom lens and got what I was after finally, close-us of birds.
There's a lot more to it than that though, the T2i is not as fast with its 4 frames per second, so I went higher and higher until I go cameras that would. The ones I have now are 10 frames per second which is not the fastest, but it works well enough for me. (These camera are in the thousands though)

Look over this forum and see if you like it, it used to be a Canon only forum but a couple of years ago they are now any brand. This is a really good forum and you can find out anything that you need. You will also be able to BUY used stuff that you can afford from someone that others trust. They have a way to see all of the stuff they have bought/sold, plus you can see how long they have been an (active) member. I trust this place as much or more than any other place including e-Bay, Craigslist, etc.

photography-on-the.net...

Here's some that I have or have had, I have also bought and sold used cameras for fun, so the lest below is only a portion of the ones that I had, but these are the ones that I use right now.

To show you how much you can save buying used, I bought a Canon 1DmkIV that sold new for $5,000. for $3,600. used, it didn't have hardly any clicks on it either.
I bought a Canon 5DmkII that sold for $3,600. new and got it used (hardly any clicks) for $1,800.
The lens I bought for the Canon 1dmkIV cost $10,000. new and I got it used for $6,800., it was owned by a pilot that liked to take shots of big jets and he rarely if ever used it, so I got a deal.
I doubt that you will want to jump in like this, but by this time I knew what I wanted, so I splurged.
For $2,000. I replaced my 1DmkIV with the Canon 7DmkII, it does essentially the same, and the 7DmkII's way lighter, andhas newer technology.

CAMERAS
Own:
Canon EOS 7D Mark II
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
Canon EOS 1D Mark IV

Previously owned:
Canon EOS Rebel XS / EOS 1000D / Kiss F
Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi / EOS 400D / Kiss Digital X
Canon EOS Digital Rebel XSi / EOS 450D / Kiss X2
Canon EOS 550D / EOS Rebel T2i / EOS Kiss X4

LENSES
Own:
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM
Samyang 14mm f/2.8 ED AS IF UMC
Tamron SP 150-600mm F/5-6.3 Di VC USD
Canon EF 100mm f/2.8 Macro USM
Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS USM
Canon EF 28-105mm f/4-5.6 USM

Previously owned:
Canon EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM
Canon EF 50mm f/1.8
Canon EF-S 55-250mm f/4-5.6 IS
Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6

FLASHES
Own:
Canon Speedlite 430EX II

Here's some links that should be of some help...

This is a really cool place, it allows you to compare side-by-side two cameras. If you want to compare a Canon 7Dmkii alongside of a Canon T6i it will show all you need to know. (It's down right now so I don't know what that means, hopefully that is only temporary)
snapsort.com...

Use this to compare the sizes of the cameras, it may not sound like it, but it can be really helpful...
camerasize.com...,154

Here's another comparison site...
www.dpreview.com...



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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If you want to see any examples let me know and I let you see.
You can just type in any camera or lens on Google Images and see what they can so though.



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: OtherSideOfTheCoin

That's why I'm looking for a camera now. I will have time to figure out what all the buttons do and when to push them.
I have a daughter in high school sports and figure I will use it for that as well.



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 05:18 PM
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I've been shooting photos since 1959 and I suggest a Nikon, the kit lenses and pick yourself up an aftermarket lens for all around shooting. Just keep on shooting, studying your results and improving. It can become a lifetime hobby. My best,



posted on Oct, 22 2017 @ 05:21 PM
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originally posted by: airforce47
I've been shooting photos since 1959 and I suggest a Nikon, the kit lenses and pick yourself up an aftermarket lens for all around shooting. Just keep on shooting, studying your results and improving. It can become a lifetime hobby. My best,


Have you always used Nikon?

And why do you prefer Nikon?



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

I recently bought the Nikon D7200 for a trip to Ireland and Scotland and love it. I opted to purchase a Tamron 18-200 mm lens so I wouldn't have to keep switching my kit lenses back and forth. I was able to frame every shot I wanted with that lens. I thought I might regret not getting the 18-300 mm but so far that has not been the case. I have an old Nikon D40x and will keep it as a back up. I looked at the D3400 as well and nearly bought it instead. The 7200 offered me just enough extras over the 3400 to make up for the additional weight (the 7200 is fairly heavy).

I looked at the mirrorless cameras as well but none of them really tripped my trigger. My friend has one (forget the brand) and is very happy with it. I have friends with both Nikon and Cannon. They let me shoot them both and I preferred the Nikon's sharpness. The Cannon had better color (it seemed) but the Nikon had better sharpness. With my skill set its easier to fix color than sharpness in post production. I shoot a variety of subjects (like most of us) but my favorites are architecture and landscape. I am also into dog sports so I shoot a lot of fast moving subjects both indoors and out. So far my Nikon D7200 has not disappointed. The 3400 is a very nice camera for the price. I bought my 7200 from a website called KEH. It was slightly used but there was not a scratch on it, looked brand new. Saved a bunch of money (though it took more than 15 minutes).

Enjoy!



posted on Oct, 23 2017 @ 03:41 PM
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a reply to: Bluntone22

Hi, see how many pixels will be suitable for you as far as what final output will be. For example, and since i know video more than photo terms, HD or 4K? Most likely 4K is not necessary, can your system edit 4K? It is not easy throwing those files around and editing them for color correction etc. You may not have a 4K display so is 4K something you want or need? That carries over to the photo part as well. How will you display the images? Will the pixel size capability print the way you want or show up good enough on your flat screen?

The reason i mention that is newer stuff go for selling point terms like 4K etc. but the low to medium end deliver only mediocre results at high resolution whereas a generation or so behind may be the better option and so what if it cannot do 4K?

In that regard you can also look at used. I think a way to determine use is by the number of shutter clicks...oh, ok here it is - www.howtogeek.com... Basically you are concerned with the camera body since you are looking for a non-fixed lens camera. That said, if i were buying a camera today i would look at a mirrorless camera.




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