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End of another era-New requirements for Boneyard tours

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posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:38 PM
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For years the Pima Air and Space Museum has offered bus tours of the Boneyard, located next door. When you purchase your ticket for the museum, you had the option of adding the bus tour to the ticket price. Then it was simply a matter of going out at the appointed time, showing a government ID, and boarding the bus.

The bus tours will continue, but starting on November 1st, all tours become reserved. You will need to make a reservation 10 days ahead of your visit, and can make them up to 90 days ahead. Due to new security requirements, the base will now run a basic background check on anyone reserving a seat on the bus, and granting a temporary security clearance for the tour.

The tour is well worth the work, and I encourage anyone going to Pima to put in the effort. There is a lot of history that you get to see. You don't go through the entire Boneyard, but you get to see a lot, and they have many old aircraft sitting there.
edit on 10/19/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:42 PM
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Just curious but what if you are a foreign national ? You mention before you have to show a government ID? Not that I plan to visit any time soon how I'd love to be able to walk around there any on my own and getting to sit in planes .. wishful thinking



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: ThePeaceMaker

They use your passport. US residents can use their driver license number, or other ID number. Foreign nationals have to use their passport number.

You stay on the bus in the Boneyard, but you can walk around right up to an impressive array of aircraft at the museum itself.
edit on 10/19/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:52 PM
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Awwww... I loved spur of the moment tours there. Oh well... the quest to penny pinch impacts fun, again.

Update appreciated as relatives are due soon and that is a common destination.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 05:54 PM
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Would be great to visit those place.

Ive probably watched 100s of US Movies, where these Aircraft Storage yards have been featured, from "My Science Project" in the 80s, to "Con air" with Cage, to the remake of "Vanishing Point" with Viggo, usually entails a car chase/smashup/ shootem up, around these old and not so old planes.

Can anyone explain.......Why does the US have seemingly, so many of these Aircraft graveyards?
Imagine how much all that scrap aluminium etc is worth?
Just seems a waste of resources, or is there an ultimate purpose?
Thx.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: gort51

Parts and spares. A great example is the Barksdale B-52 fire a few years ago, and the C-5 nose gear problem more recently.

A few years ago, there was a cockpit fire on a B-52 while they were on the ground at Barksdale. The aircraft was written off due to the amount of damage and cost to fix it. Under certain treaties, we're supposed to have a certain number of B-52s active. To meet that treaty, they went to the Boneyard and dug out Ghost Rider. She had been sitting stored for about 7 years and was one of the younger aircraft stored. It took about two months to return her to flying status. She was then flown to Barksdale where she had certain required equipment moved from the damaged aircraft, to her. Then she underwent a 19 month Depot upgrade and is now at Minot flying missions.

More recently, they had two C-5s in 90 days land with the nose gear retracted. After the problem was found, it turned out to be a part that isn't produced anymore. So to limit the damage to their spares stock, they went t to the Boneyard and pulled as many of the parts off aircraft stored there as they could. Then used the ones in spares stocks to cover the difference.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: gort51

They are a hang over from the cold war, Russia also had or has them as part of the arms treatise meant to prevent either side having too many asset's and so they had to be visible from space and could be monitored by satellite, I wonder if any of them were dummy's.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: LABTECH767


This is the only military yard in the US. All the others are civilian that serve the same purpose. They're required to keep the aircraft in AMARG until the last one flying anywhere else in the world is retired. That way, regardless of the operator, parts are available.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:05 PM
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Thanks for the information guys. Makes sense now. Cheers.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:07 PM
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a reply to: gort51

Many civilian boneyards hold aircraft in limbo. That is tax issues, lawsuits, etc. That is in addition to the usual reasons like spares, excess inventory, etc.




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