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Risk of 'ecological Armageddon' as number of flying insects plunges

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posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:19 AM
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news.sky.com...

Why do these Scientists never say what the real problem is which is over-population and industrialism on a global scale??

Not saying 'pesticides' have nothing to do with it but it's also obvious about the other 2 I just mentioned but every time I see a report on 'Insects' declining, they never mention it.

Are they instructed not to mention it?

Or what?

their are bodies out there who want this to happen and have been for a long time. I've said it before that they are trying to change our atmosphere and possibly trying to kill us off... as to who the 'they' are.. well, I have my theory of it being aliens... the malevolent ones.

some of the story:



The number of flying insects has dropped by up to 75% in less than 30 years, provoking the risk of an "ecological Armageddon", scientists have said. Research stretching over 63 protected areas in Germany and dating back to 1989 provides a frightening view of ecological change - with implications across the globe. It showed an average annual decline of 76% over the course of the study, and as much as 82% in mid-summer. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal Plos One and warned the "loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardise ecosystem services."




posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Actually just read another report on 'Parrots' dying out in Tasmania and in that report it is mentioned that deforestation and Industrialism is the problem along with Marsupials eating them but thankfully nest boxes are being put in place.



Much of the drop is thanks to humans. In recent years deforestation has seriously depleted Tasmania's ancient forests, slashing the birds' habitat and making them more likely to come face-to-face with a sugar glider. "In areas where deforestation is worse, the likelihood of being eaten by a sugar glider is higher," Dr Stojanovic said. "Habitat is the most important issue and it's still being lost by industrial forestry."



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Seems that the good ones are in decline ( Bees )

Whilst the nasty ones are constant ( mozzies, fire ants, termites etc. )

The gods must hate us ...



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 06:37 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Problem is situation should be better in Europe. Really lot was done in environment protection past 30 years while population and forest/fields ratio is stable.

What changed? Agricultural methods and crops.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:06 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

One of the precursors to Nibirus arrival.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Problem is situation should be better in Europe. Really lot was done in environment protection past 30 years while population and forest/fields ratio is stable.

What changed? Agricultural methods and crops.


What changed?

Massive population increase and more buildings being built.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:33 AM
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originally posted by: TruthxIsxInxThexMist
news.sky.com...

Why do these Scientists never say what the real problem is which is over-population and industrialism on a global scale??

Not saying 'pesticides' have nothing to do with it but it's also obvious about the other 2 I just mentioned but every time I see a report on 'Insects' declining, they never mention it.

Are they instructed not to mention it?

Or what?

their are bodies out there who want this to happen and have been for a long time. I've said it before that they are trying to change our atmosphere and possibly trying to kill us off... as to who the 'they' are.. well, I have my theory of it being aliens... the malevolent ones.

some of the story:



The number of flying insects has dropped by up to 75% in less than 30 years, provoking the risk of an "ecological Armageddon", scientists have said. Research stretching over 63 protected areas in Germany and dating back to 1989 provides a frightening view of ecological change - with implications across the globe. It showed an average annual decline of 76% over the course of the study, and as much as 82% in mid-summer. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal Plos One and warned the "loss of insect diversity and abundance is expected to provoke cascading effects on food webs and to jeopardise ecosystem services."
I just killed a massive spider and it cheered me up somewhat, this house aint big enough for the two of us



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Yes. It's happening already. Wondering where all the birds went, too?

No doubt that neonicotinoids are killing birds, bees, scientists say



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:07 AM
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Based on my experience, I would believe that native plants and wildflowers are not being planted and that is limited the diversity of insects. A lot of plants that would naturally grow are considered weeds for the most part, but every plant has a number of insects that fully depend on them. People's yards are full of exotic plant species, farms plant mono-culture crops, and non-native plants compete with native ones where they grow. I'd say that is a big part of the reason for the decline, a non-diverse, non-native plant population along with the other stresses.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:18 AM
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originally posted by: MichiganSwampBuck
Based on my experience, I would believe that native plants and wildflowers are not being planted and that is limited the diversity of insects. A lot of plants that would naturally grow are considered weeds for the most part, but every plant has a number of insects that fully depend on them. People's yards are full of exotic plant species, farms plant mono-culture crops, and non-native plants compete with native ones where they grow. I'd say that is a big part of the reason for the decline, a non-diverse, non-native plant population along with the other stresses.


Most people are pouring concrete over their gardens which is a big problem.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:19 AM
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originally posted by: PublicOpinion
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Yes. It's happening already. Wondering where all the birds went, too?

No doubt that neonicotinoids are killing birds, bees, scientists say


Yep.. where I live the birds and bees are almost non-existant now wheras 30 years ago there were plenty



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:39 AM
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originally posted by: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

originally posted by: JanAmosComenius
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Problem is situation should be better in Europe. Really lot was done in environment protection past 30 years while population and forest/fields ratio is stable.

What changed? Agricultural methods and crops.


What changed?

Massive population increase and more buildings being built.


No, there is no massive population increase in Germany (or any other EU country) last 30 years. Lot of (especially heavy) industrial production went offshore etc. Stress on environment should be lower.

Main part of problem is probably in "bio" fuel production - in fact this "experiment" is ecological disaster at least in terms of agricultural soil degradation.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: Timely
a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Seems that the good ones are in decline ( Bees )

Whilst the nasty ones are constant ( mozzies, fire ants, termites etc. )

The gods must hate us ...


I wouldn't shed a tear over mosquitoes and yellow jackets/wasp dying out. Yeah, yeah, I know some other animal may feed on them in the food chain, but god I hate mosquitoes and yellow jackets with a passion.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

I live in the Hudson Valley of New York and spend a lot of time out of doors. The decline in insect populations is obvious here, and also of birds, in the last twenty years. We still have plenty, but not like I used to see. Late springtime here used to sound like every day in a certain region of Colombia I am familiar with, where the climate is spring-like all year -- a super abundance of bees, birds and butterflies. That is no longer the case. Not anywhere close.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 09:31 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Few people or even Mother Nature will miss the hordes of locusts/grasshoppers that used to devastate everything green in their path. That was Nature run amok. But you seem to blame humanity as the culprit, period. While that may be true in the larger sense, the decline is more due to the use of pesticides than the existence of humans.

At a deeper level, however we could blame the over abundance of the locusts/grasshoppers on the "modern" use of crop farming as supplying a ready and abundant food supply for those critters. But in the final analysis, then, humans are to blame...or, I would go back even further and cite the old adage of it is a "dog eat dog" world and humans, here at this place, seem to be top dog over all. In other words, this situation is the expected nature of things.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

All I can say is not in Texas. Theres lots of bugs everywhere.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

The lack of ecological diversity may destroy our species. We can only hope and pray the Chinese solve all our problems. Because solutions are not going to come out of the United States.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 10:03 AM
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It's not just cities though. I live in the scottish Highlands, and the number of insects around this summer collapsed. Usually there's swarms of all sorts of insects all through the summertime, adn this year? Virtually nothing, it was seriously weird being outside.

It was like being outside in the winter, just, nothing flying around or crawling around.

And I live in the middle of nowhere, very clean water and air, no pesticides.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 11:25 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

Over population is a total bloody myth. In the UK, for example, there is more space given over to golf courses and such, than there is to housing, by a solid margin I might add. This is both utterly ridiculous, and entirely typical of the rich and powerful to organise. We could have more farmland, and more housing than we have by HUGE margins, if our planning departments and our local and national governments, had not been co-opted by centre right econo-fascist scum. As it is though, we are hostage to a toxic paradigm at present, something I have been trying to work against my whole adult life.

Industrialisation however, does cause problems, big ones. Always has, always will, until someone stops it by way of making law which prohibits it (with strong enough penalties that the owners of companies would not dare to violate them, for fear of having their home repossessed from under them, their net worth liquidated and spread amongst the population, as well as being banged up for the rest of their natural lives in what you and I would call a bedsit, but they would call hell). Small industry which supports local economies, that is what we need here. Small companies, doing well enough to employ lots of staff, without having to grow to fill a gap in international markets. That would be nice, would it not?



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: TruthxIsxInxThexMist

It's kind of fitting though, 'insect Armaggedon'.

There are a myriad of reasons why this drop has occured.

Nearly all of them captured by comparison of

1. the average price of a house in SW1 (location of the Chemical Industries Association) is £4M and
2. the average price of a house in the 'North East Process Industry Cluster', where 1,400 chemical plants are is £185k.

Simply a 21 fold difference, suggesting perhaps no one who can afford to lives near chemical plants. I would guess this is a ratio found more or less the world over.

No easy answers I'm afraid, as sadly no one wants what we all seem to need.



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