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BREAKING: Puerto Rican Secretary Of State Blows Whistle On Hurricane Relief Fraud, Finds Unopened US

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posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 01:48 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
However, although it is my assertion that everyone who can help, should be able to, it is my understanding that Puerto Rico is, for all intents and purposes, a US held territory, even if it is not actually a state in and of itself, and should be deserving of at least as much help as arrived on the mainland, when Florida and Houston took their respective kickings, from the fury of nature. No doubt their were problems there too, issues cropping up with this thing and that, but not MASS STARVATION!

Again, you are implying that the only difference here is the speed and amount of aid provided by the federal government.

The federal government didn't tell PR to allow their electrical grid to dilapidate to the point of complete failure. And with that failure, it's not like local power companies from 20 surrounding states can just drive their trucks and supplies along federal highways to get to the damaged spots to help repair them.

As for your repeated complaints about the Jones Act waiver and the timeframe for which it happened:

What will Jones Act waiver mean for the delivery of goods to people in Puerto Rico?

Even as vessels arrive, though, the island faces additional challenges in getting the goods on shore. U.S. shipping company Crowley, whose vessels already comply with Jones Act regulations and regularly deliver cargo to Puerto Rico, reported that they deployed additional vessels to hasten the delivery of goods. They also dispatched 50 relief trucks to deliver supplies around the island, because on-island distribution is at the heart of the supply shortage.

CNN reported that goods entering Puerto Rico are piling up at the ports, and the island’s damaged infrastructure is to blame. Fuel shortages, damaged roads and debris are preventing truckers from showing up to work, so ships carrying supplies are waiting to enter the port of San Juan, and more are on standby in the U.S. These ships are waiting to deliver goods to people in need. Yennifer Alvarez, spokeswoman for Puerto Rico’s governor, said as many as 9,500 containers of supplies are sitting at the port of San Juan.

The Maritime Labor Allowance said in a statement that, “there are currently 15 U.S.-flag ships and U.S.-flag oceangoing tug/barge combinations regularly serving Puerto Rico. These vessels alone are now bringing in more supplies than can be distributed ashore,” adding that they support a Jones Act waiver in emergencies where there is a shortage of vessels.

If there becomes a shortage of U.S. flagged vessels, companies can now draw from a larger pool of vessels to help ship goods to Puerto Rico.

PBS.org

Please note the bolded section that states that just the U.S. vessels alone were already bringing in more than the ports could distribute--the Jones Act opens up ports to non-U.S. vessels. So, you can complain about the length of time that it took to waive the Jones Act (again), but distribution was the problem, not the lack of aid and supplies.

Complaining about the timeframe of waiving the Jones Act is a glaringly obvious red herring.



That is true, and if you read my posts on the topic, I did not say that the islanders should be sent flat screen TVs and XBox Ones, nor did I suggest that their houses should already have been fully rebuilt or any other such nonsense... the most important thing is that people are at least FED correctly and in the proper amounts. You can get by without a whole host of the trappings of modern life, as long as your belly is full. If it is not, then your odds of contracting a disease or succumbing to the elements in some way, increase drastically.

If you re-read my comment, I never mentioned TVs or anything of the sort, either. You can't pretend that I put words in your mouth in the same paragraph that you put words in mine. My comment about 100% comfort level was about food (and water), which I had mistakenly assumed would be readily apparent, since that's all that I was discussing.


As it is, no, I specifically have done not a damned thing about Puerto Rico ... If I had something to give, I would have done it on the 29th of last month.

You know, not all efforts have to be monetary. You can be a local collection point for donations, like I am, and then have a charity collecting for PR pick it up and ship it out, all at no cost to you. That's what we've done that has cost us nothing. I don't know if that's something that you could do in your area--maybe it's not.

But a lack of money is no excuse for doing absolutely nothing (other than "correcting" people online)--and blaming the Jones Act is a cop-out...but a convenient way to bitch about Trump, I suppose.



It would appear as if you do not wish to find solutions either...

Your interpretation, not my reality. Of course, it's not my job to find solutions, even though I am being part of a solution. It's better than "do[ing] not a damn thing" while complaining about Trump taking longer than you think is appropriate on one part of the issue.



The answer absolutely IS for the Federal Government to maintain a high standard of nutrition for everyone on that island ... The assistance provided by the US government ... should come as standard, like holding open the door for others. Common courtesy.

We agree on the moral part of the issue, but we will agree to disagree as to the extent that the obligation of 100% nutrional supplementation of PR citizens falls completely on the federal government.



I would be very interested in the results of his or her researches on the matter.

If I think about it, I'll do a thread on what he says, if it's substantial enough. If not, I'll try to PM you about what he says.




posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: VoxVirtus
a reply to: ElectricUniverse

So food wrapped and stored in plastic, and water in plastic jugs are no longer usable if they get a little wet?

Exactly one of my first thoughts.

I've eaten my fair share of MREs during my (15 years ago) military career, and even then, they were packaged in boxes of individually wrapped, very thick sealed plastic pouches, with every single content inside also sealed in its own packaging within, down to the salt, pepper, and hot sauce.

Sitting out in the rain or even in standing water would not render the internal contents inedible, and I have a very, very hard time believing that they were expired MREs. Even if they were sitting out in 100 degrees for a few days or weeks, it would not render them inedible or dangerous at all for consumption.

So, unless these boxes of MREs were damaged to where packaging was likely to be punctured through all of those layers, there is no reason that they should be going to waste, even if some of them are nasty AF.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

That's great. Let's make little kids and toddlers soldier on with wet cold meals.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 02:18 PM
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originally posted by: MOMof3
a reply to: SlapMonkey

That's great. Let's make little kids and toddlers soldier on with wet cold meals.

Never had the pleasure of munching down an MRE, have you?

(Pro tip: They all have water-activated heaters that heat up the food)

Regardless, a hot meal is a luxury that often cannot be afforded in times of crisis and limited resources...even for little kids and toddlers.

When is enough going to be enough? The U.S. is doing its part to get supplies there that end up trapped at the docks and not being distributed (due to many variables, most of which are not the fault of the federal government). Then when we do get them food, people complain about the quality or state of the food instead of understanding that it's a great thing that they even have food.

I have been in situations where I had to live off of MREs for days at a time, most of the time without the luxury of heating them up. Guess what? I survived, and actually still enjoyed the food because I needed it and it was there.

I guarantee you that the vast majority of people are enjoying the food that they receive because they need it and it's there for them (when it can get distributed out). Whether or not they can heat it up in a crisis situation will not even be a concern for the vast majority of people--but, I guess, if you're just typing on the internet, it becomes an issue to complain about.

Let's not reduce this discussion to appeals-to-emotion logical fallacies and what-about-the-children emotional complaints, because if you have an MRE in your hand, even if the outside of it is covered in mud and who know what else, the inside contents will be perfectly fine...and if they want it heated up, they can put the main course in the heater pouch, add some unclean water, and the food inside will still be perfectly fine...and hot.

Again--never seen an MRE or eaten one, have you?



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

The Jone Act exemption already expired on October 8th for Puerto Rico. Trump refused to extend it.
edit on 19-10-2017 by jrod because: Add date



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 02:57 PM
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a reply to: jrod

I understand that--and the point of my entire post is that it's an unnecessary thing to do and it was unnecessary at the time that he did it. It's part of the quote from the PBS link that I cited in the comment to which you replied.

Now, I have yet to see ANY evidence that an extension would be doing anything beneficial over what is being provided by U.S.-flagged vessels...at least, anything verifiable. Sure, it's a nice political move to do so, but if it's unnecessary, why do it? Obviously, it can be done pretty easily, so if it's shown that it's necessary in the future, then it can be done with relative ease.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 03:37 PM
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originally posted by: Sillyolme
a reply to: ElectricUniverse

It was probably a dumpster full of rotting food that was purchased before the hurricane that was spoiled due to no electricity no refrigeration. Someone claiming it's aid being discarded.
Why would they throw good food away?



MREs are good for 20 years and the boxes are labled as MREs.

the only trouble they might have with MREs is getting them open as the plastic bags the MRE meals is very hard to open without a knife.
the funnest thing i ever watched when i was in the navy was marines in training trying to open MRE meals without any knives or other ways to cut open the meals.
two rocks was not very effective in opening the meal packs.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: ANNED




MREs are good for 20 years and the boxes are labled as MREs.


shelf life for MRE's is tempature dependent, from 1 month at 120 degress F to 7years at 60 degrees F according to the USDA.

Is an MRE shelf stable? Yes. MRE's are shelf stable because they have been commercially sterilized by heat in a sealed container to destroy bacteria that can make it unsafe or spoil the food. Like food in metal cans, MRE's can be kept for a long time, but not indefinitely. The shelf life is highly related to the storage temperature. For example, if stored at 120 °F (a temperature that could be encountered on desert battlefields), the MRE should be used within a month. Stored at 60 °F, an MRE can last 7 years or more.
Shelf -Stable Food Safety


the wiki says,

Shelf life is often specified in conjunction with a specific product, package, and distribution system. For example, an MRE field ration is designed to have a shelf life of three years at 80 °F (27 °C) and six months at 100 °F (38 °C).[16]
Shelf Life


i've looked for a official U.S. military answer but can't find one.
when i was in the Corps, i seem to remember that it was one month at 120 and 5yrs at 60, but that's been many many moons ago.

to be on the safest side i would go with the expiration date printed on the box and how long they have been stored above 60 degrees even if left outside at night but using daytime temps.


edit on 19-10-2017 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:24 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Not arguing there are no problems.

However, in the video/picture link, the dumpster is most likely not a dumpster.

It's the back of a M872 trailer. Very commonly used with the M915. If supplies are being moved around PR by the military, this combination is what would be used most of the time.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

I always thought they were pretty decent, especially the thick bread with jalapeno cheese spread = yum. The chili-mac was always my favorite entrée, and the hexamine-something heaters did a great job heating everything up.

I have to agree with you here, if you are hungry even cold or wet food is better than remaining hungry.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 05:11 PM
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originally posted by: FamCore
a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Who benefits from throwing away invaluable food supplies like this in a time of crisis? Could it have been a mistake? Or willful negligence?

If this was done knowingly, it's nothing short of criminal.


Now, now..don't go asking intelligent questions, just go along with the fake news narrative.

The card-board boxed supplies were left at the port exposed to rain and rats due to the Trump Administration thinking they could stack some boxes on shore and call it a day despite their being no fuel for transport, few roads passable, no electricity and no tarps.

No one benefits from the wasted supplies. It is pure incompetence of this administration. They finally had to hand over relief operations to the military.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 05:15 PM
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originally posted by: ABNARTY
a reply to: ElectricUniverse


It's the back of a M872 trailer. Very commonly used with the M915. If supplies are being moved around PR by the military, this combination is what would be used most of the time.



Yes. Military.

FROM SEPTEMBER 29: U.S. military dispatches three-star general to Puerto Rico amid charges of supply snafus


thousands of containers of supplies are stuck at San Juan's port because of red tape, lack of drivers and a crippling power outage.

He cited problems getting supplies and aid to residents: 12 of the 29 bridges that have been assessed are closed; another 65 are damaged.

Cornelio also said the number of open gas stations has increased from about 400 to 676.

Although some fuel, water and medicine is trickling into the interior of the island, local and state officials said the response has been too little, too late.



In Washington, Homeland Security Adviser Tom Bossert pushed back Thursday on reports that the federal response has been slow, blaming "misreporting."

www.usatoday.com...



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:02 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

not the first time. Haiti still hasn't got it's relief $$$ from a decade ago. lol.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: MOMof3
a reply to: SlapMonkey

That's great. Let's make little kids and toddlers soldier on with wet cold meals.


And you would rather people starve than eating MREs?...

MREs might not be that great in taste but they feed people.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: nataylor

Right at the beginning of the video I linked to. “In a garbage dump truck, we found pallets full of meals ready to be distributed at one time, but now all spoiled.”


The link can make that claim, but it is not what is said by Marin. I have also watched the Spanish videos and nowhere is it said "the food is in a garbage truck". Not to mention the fact that how do you put inside a garbage truck full pallets with food standing with the pallet on the bottom, and how do you take those pallets out of a garbage truck without the pallets of food falling on their side and breaking?



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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a reply to: ElectricUniverse

Since we are pretending that I have a say in this tragedy, I would have community kitchens by now. Until there is power and grocery stores opened.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 09:26 PM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
The link can make that claim, but it is not what is said by Marin.

It's a video of him saying that word for word (in english) during an interview.

You could have at least watched it before dismissing it.



posted on Oct, 19 2017 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse

The link can make that claim, but it is not what is said by Marin. I have also watched the Spanish videos and nowhere is it said "the food is in a garbage truck". Not to mention the fact that how do you put inside a garbage truck full pallets with food standing with the pallet on the bottom, and how do you take those pallets out of a garbage truck without the pallets of food falling on their side and breaking?


So you completely ignored that i wrote in that post you quoted.


originally posted by: ElectricUniverse

The link can make that claim, but it is not what is said by Marin. I have also watched the Spanish videos and nowhere is it said "the food is in a garbage truck". Not to mention the fact that how do you put inside a garbage truck full pallets with food standing with the pallet on the bottom, and how do you take those pallets out of a garbage truck without the pallets of food falling on their side and breaking?


I see now that the twitter video he does say "garbage dump truck" but when he talks in his native language, Spanish, he doesn't say that.



posted on Oct, 20 2017 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey

I always wanted the chicken chunks and beef stew so i could get the hot sauce. Blueberry cobbler really sux. But 5 mres you can easily survive a week. However many civilians would not beaware of this and eat everything at once. And in a survival situation you get matches sugar salt . Considering what they have i dont understand the complaints



posted on Oct, 20 2017 @ 01:25 AM
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originally posted by: ElectricUniverse
I see now that the twitter video he does say "garbage dump truck" but when he talks in his native language, Spanish, he doesn't say that.

That is true but the article does say dumpster.

What he actually says is "tirada" which means that it is thrown out but was it really thrown out? People here have chimed in and said that those packages should be fine if all that happened was that some water soaked the boxes they came in.

That also doesn't look like a dumpster or any kind of garbage receptacle. I wouldn't put it past those in charge of handing things out to create a bit of demand and make a little money here and there. In the words of Barzini "After all we are not Communists".

Any way you slice it, the article in the OP was not accurate.



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