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29 states have legal pot. Jeff Sessions wants to stamp it out, and he's closer than you think

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posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:16 AM
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Strange I see this thread today. Yesterday as I was walking by one of the bigger legal dispensaries here in Seattle I noticed a sign out front saying 50% off the entire store. 50% ?!?

I've only seen that kind of deal in going out of business sales (of anything, not just cannabis). I walked in, and the store had completely changed the inside and it was empty feeling, all the intricate and expensive glassware that used to decorate the place was gone and there were sale stickers on everything. I couldn't help but think that maybe the owners know something?

It's one of the bigger cannabis companies with stores in Denver as well so it would only make sense they'd have their finger on the pulse a lot more than dispensaries that only work in Seattle.

In the interest of full disclosure I work in the legal cannabis industry, but not at the dispensary level anymore. I'm going to ask around and see if anyone in the industry has heard anything. Something just felt off about the gigantic sale and the empty way the store was set up. Almost like they were planning to vacate at a moments notice if they had to.




posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Well that's an unpleasant thing to hear. Please keep us in the loop when you find out.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: jrod

If states can ignore laws on illegal immigration, then I'm not too worried about the feds closing pot shops in states where it is legal.


The feds ignore illegal immigration. The whole con of going after a few dozen laborers at a time seems to be fooling quite a few...

When you see tell feds go after the employers you will know they aren't wagging the dog.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:29 AM
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originally posted by: DBCowboy
I don't know why states haven't gone "Sanctuary cities/states" for pot smokers.


Or when the feds start going after the source of the problem, and popping serious fines or jail time for the recruiters and tax cheats that pay illegals, you may have a point.

Otherwise it's a con.

Like appointment of a drug zar in bed with opioid manufacturers..

Come on man your smarter than to be conned by rhetoric.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: intrptr



Lol, the ones viewing weed as 'dangerous' are the Liquor Conglomerates, Consortium, Establishment, what have you.


back in the day i consumed masses amounts of both at the same time. in fact when consuming one or the other i was more likely to go looking for the other, unless it was in a place where the smell of one lingered from me far longer than the other was unacceptable.

i find it hard to believe that Liquor sales would be down due just to the fact that legalization occurred in a state.


edit on 18-10-2017 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: jrod

People on Juries just need to start declaring people being charged with marijuana innocent.

If they can't prosecute marijuana possession they will have to change things.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: grey580

The people getting charged first have to trust that they won't be charged and ask for a trial with a public defender when given the option. Usually the coerce you to take a deal, go to rehab, probation, etc..vs the maximum sentence of found guilty.

God forbid you can't afford bail, and miss your job in the process.
edit on 18-10-2017 by luthier because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Intereresting. I suspect the people are waking up to the idea of liberty, and that a little, like cannabis, is both precious, and also, a lot. Personally, even if I needed it, I would not let my name on an official government roster of users. You never know what new piss is going to spurt from session's mouth. Besides, once you are registered, you have your second amendment rights stripped. This is an obvious trap. What is to stop them from applying the same prohibition to recreationals? New what I meen? Imagine were one forced to register each time one bought liquor, a highly addictive, highly dangerous and volatile toxin, with lingering effects.

Look what it did to the Chicago cubs. They were seen pouring the stuff down their throats, rubbing the stuff on their skin, showering in it, a booze orgy, after squeaking by the nationals with like three hits per game. You can watch them on liveleak, as the event was caught on film, and proudly circulated, while their inhibitions were booze-eradicated. The tape might be hard to find in the near future.

Like a parentless child, or one raised by progressives, the team has no coaching staff so they are often left chained and powerless to cope against their gilded urges. They did the same thing last year, affirming the recidivist nature of alcohol abuse. But this year they outdid themselves; before the dope wore off, their flight to LA was forced to ground for an emergency medical situation (probably acute alcohol poisoning but no one is talking). They skipped their practice due to hangovers and hypoxemia. The deleterious effects are showing 5 days later. Look at them now lol. The odd thing is that despite being barely able to function on foot, they are able to drive, and legally, the very next day. Imagine such examples of debilitation being in possession of projectile weapons?

Perhaps people are finding that they can meet their needs outside of government sanctioned outlets? I would not be caught dead in one, but that's me. Sometimes there's a few crumbs left in a bag, on the street, but mostly benzos. People toss these before traffic stops. Who wants to die crossing a cop? I admit being strongly tempted to ambulate the areas where dispensaries are found, because there is likely to be some dropped on the ground.
Too, I wonder what is to be found in their trash, but in no case would I go inside because there is no sickness on earth which could motivate me to register away my God given right to defend myself.

The cops are busting anyone caught trying to buy/sell untaxed, in states where recreational is legal. They steal the money and let the perps walk, usually. In my state they are considering recreational, and I never looked inside a dispensary, so I have no idea what the crowd size is. But for my money, they can shove it, as they ruined millions of lives already with their involvement and deserve nothing from taxation. Not a cent.

# 901
edit on 18-10-2017 by TheWhiteKnight because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 10:59 AM
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originally posted by: hopenotfeariswhatweneed
a reply to: jrod

If Kim and Jeff could get their # together they could literally nuke marijuana out of existence.


Lil Kim wouldn´t:


Today, use of cannabis appears to be widespread in North Korea. From the few reports of modern cannabis use in North Korea that have emerged in recent years (such as The Bohemian Blog’s interesting and oft-quoted account of a tour of the northern city of Rason), it seems that cannabis is used as a substitute for tobacco, and may even be viewed more kindly than tobacco by North Korean authorities.

Sensi Seeds

I guess it´s easier to rule if the people are stoned and don´t care that much anymore.... xD
And it is good for the medical costs of NK!

Maybe he even cares more about his people than the rulers in the west, if it comes to tobacco and cannabis?



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: jrod

They were never free to partake without fear of federal prosecution since it was and is still illegal on a federal level. The quotes second paragraph makes the claim that three years after participants were free to....
But they never were.

In every state where they made it legal it was and is a federal crime.
Just blows my mind.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: TheWhiteKnight

I'm definitely against any system that would require a person to register with the government just to buy cannabis. Especially if it logged every purchase and stored a record of it. That seems like overkill. Especially given how innocuous a substance it is compared to our accepted legal "drugs". Alcohol I'm looking at you.

And the whole issue surrounding the right to bear arms being taken from cannabis users is insane, and is blatantly nothing more than a grab for rights using the gray area legal cannabis resides in as a staging ground.

The only real fear I have of federal legalization is the corporatizing of cannabis. Right now, it's a lot of smaller independent growers. Don't get me wrong there are huge producers, but they aren't the rule at the moment. If federal legalization happens I fear we'll shift to a country of mass-produced cannabis and eventually the little guy will be squeezed out by the giants that step in once they can bank legally.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 11:33 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

I know for a fact that buying recreational weed in Las Vegas is completely anonymous.

One would think the medical database violatea the patient doctor confidentiality clause.

I dont think big corporations would take over the cannabis industry. Look at the boom in microbreweries. There is a much higher demand for 'craft weed' with variety than there is for beer. What might happen is a big corporation will sell a generic product for low costs(kind of like the beer industry) but the demand for novelty strains in the cannabis industry is very high.(no pun intended)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

One way or another the proggressive globaliss regime will grab guns. I do not think progs and globalists will ever feel safe, at least not until they land themselves in the safety of concentration camps, free of the horrors of liberty and responsibility. The cannabis gun grab was shameless. Who in their right mind would consent to this? I second your concern. They will attempt a big pharma prescription pill thingy. As for the 2nd, it looks like the next filter will be from the vegas hit, metal detectors and scanners. How does one carry when these things are everywhere, setting off alarms?

Thankfully, I am careful with herbals, and the words of Marcellus ring true. A member here had the exact quote as a signature, which has eluded me on search engines and which struck me as among the wisest of sayings. To wit, he said a wise person will do no more, or less, of a thing, whether malum is se, or malum prohibitum, whether rich or poor, according to his or her instinct. It has always served me well. A little, is a lot. Gluttony is stupid and life shortening, and saps vitality.

# 902




edit on 18-10-2017 by TheWhiteKnight because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: underwerks

Please keep us posted.

I know it is harvest time for the outdoor and greenhouse farms. Perhaps they just have too much product.

If it is becfederal of a looming federal crackdown, ATS needs to know!



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Yep.

That needs to be reformed as well.

No one should have to go broke trying to defend themselves.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: underwerks

Please keep us posted.

I know it is harvest time for the outdoor and greenhouse farms. Perhaps they just have too much product.

If it is becfederal of a looming federal crackdown, ATS needs to know!

I will.


I don't claim to know a lot of people in the industry but if there's enough talk of a looming federal crackdown to cause one of the biggest dispensaries in the city to start emptying it's store, I'm sure someone somewhere has heard something.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: hopenotfeariswhatweneed

Kim? interestingly pot is completely legal in NK..considered a herb.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: jrod
a reply to: underwerks
I dont think big corporations would take over the cannabis industry. Look at the boom in microbreweries. There is a much higher demand for 'craft weed' with variety than there is for beer. What might happen is a big corporation will sell a generic product for low costs(kind of like the beer industry) but the demand for novelty strains in the cannabis industry is very high.(no pun intended)


That's what I see happening as well. But I think it'll be easier for large scale grow ops to compete with the craft cannabis companies, than it is for the large breweries to corner the market on craft-style beer.

Some of the cheaper brands out here in Washington are getting just as good as the more expensive brands sold in the same store. It's starting to mostly just come down to packaging and name. Once these mega-corporations get the science of growing it on a large scale, which won't be too long after federal legalization, I fear a lot of the smaller operations will be forced out. There will always be smaller growers, but the industry as it is now will completely change.

What I'm interested in even more so than what will happen to the legal market is what the laws will be about growing your own after federal legalization. I'm wondering whether it'll be a personal limit type of thing, or illegal like making moonshine is now?
edit on 18-10-2017 by underwerks because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: underwerks

Well moonshine kills people and makes them go blind. If people get fungus in their lungs it's possible I suppose.

Large growers won't be attractive to the people who are eating at gastropubs and looking for farm to table.

Not to mention profit motives generally cut corners in larger operations.



posted on Oct, 18 2017 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: luthier

Good moonshine makes people go blind....good shine is probably safer than many of the fancy flavored and spiced liquors available.

If you look at popular cannibis strains from the 70's compared to today, it is a world of difference. It will be interesting to see if the plant continues to be modified due to our demand.
edit on 18-10-2017 by jrod because: (no reason given)



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