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FBI uncovered Russian bribery plot before Obama admin approved nuclear deal with Moscow

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posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 01:13 PM
link   

originally posted by: Gryphon66
All of the faux-servatives love Zero Hedge, right?



In 2013, ARMZ paid roughly $2.8 billion for the remaining 48 percent and full control of Uranium One. Finally, in that same year, Rosatom assumed direct ownership of the company, reorganizing it under Uranium One Holding (U1H) and delisting it from the Toronto stock exchange.


Just so we all know what we're talking about ...



Among U1H’s assets are a handful of US projects and exploration tracts. The most advanced among them are Jab and Antelope, Moore Ranch, and Willow Creek – all of which are in Wyoming, developed under the auspices of Uranium One USA and Uranium One Americas. The Willow Creek project is their only currently active operation.

So, to further answer the lead question: Russia, via Rosatom and U1H, owns roughly 20 percent of US uranium production capacity. The share of US reserves is much less clear as economic constraints significantly muddy the picture. Looking at actual production, U1H, via Willow Creek, produced an estimated 210 tons of uranium, or 11 percent of the 1887.5 tons extracted in the US in 2014.

Still, it’s somewhat disingenuous to say this uranium is now Russia’s, to do with what it pleases, or to suggest that any amount of the uranium will end up in Iran. The current licenses – held by the US-based subsidiaries and approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission – do not allow exports from any U1H US facility.


Zero Hedge May 7 2015

(This article is important because it is contemporaneous with another article from the New York Times in which a single unconfirmed statement from a U1H spokesperson said that material was indeed being shipped out of the US.)

So, summarizing again what this brouhaha is all about ... The Canadian company Uranium One WHICH ALREADY OWNED THE US URANIUM MINES under discussion, was brought under Russian company Rosatom control via a merger approved by CFIUS, a ten-member committee, as well as by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The State Department sits on this committee along with nine other Department level executives. Hillary Clinton did not vote on the matter of the Uranium One acquisition. (Washington Post).

Above, one can see that Zero Hedge focuses on the fact that what the Russians got was American PRODUCTION CAPACITY.

Why is that important?

Again, from Zero Hedge:



The truth is, the US uranium industry as its currently built isn’t all that American. In fact, it’s mostly Canadian. Qualms over perceived threats to national security are misplaced, though not entirely dismissible. The deal further illustrates an already pronounced trend of the decline of US nuclear capabilities and influence at all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Post-Fukushima – and post-shale gas revolution – US nuclear employment has fallen more than 34 percent and exploration and development drilling is down over 80 percent. Relatively low-grade uranium and low global prices stunt the value of US mines in the short- to medium-term. Further out, stricter regulation and a heavier reliance on the private sector, limit the industry’s potential abroad relative to its competitors.

Perhaps more importantly, the deal speaks to Rosatom’s aggressive new growth. Already the world’s most comprehensive nuclear services vendor, Rosatom is now one of the top three producers of uranium by volume worldwide. For the most part, the prize was Kazakhstan and not the United States, which is a symbolic victory at best.


SO ... The US didn't own the uranium production mines in question to start with... Canada did.

Now, someone will probably rightly point out that this article is from 2015, as I pointed out the other day that another "AH HA!" article from the Times was from the same year.

What's going on with these mines in 2017? Well, let's ask the World Nuclear Association:



The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a licence to Uranium One Americas for Moore Ranch in October 2010, to start production in 2012, but development is suspended. Uranium One’s additional projects in the Powder River Basin, including Ludeman, Allemand-Ross, Barge (1770 tU), Pine Tree and Ross Flats could also be developed as satellite operations with final processing through the Irigaray central plant.

Uranium One has some 4000 tU as measured resources (2235 t at Moore Ranch) and 23,000 tU as indicated resources in the state. Ludeman is quoted with 4200 tU total resources (NI 43-101). It also had plans for production from Antelope and JAB in the Great Divide Basin, but these were deferred due to endangered species concerns. Uranium One deposits in the Great Divide Basin of Wyoming are Antelope, JAB, Twin Buttes, Crooks Creek, Bull Springs, Stewart Creek, Cyclone Rim and West JAB.

In 2016 Uranium One sold 24 Wyoming properties in the Black Hills, Powder River Basin, Great Divide Basin, Laramie Basin, Shirley Basin and Wind River Basin areas to Anfield Resources for $6.55 million.


Wow! So, the Russians aren't mining much uranium at all these days, eh? In fact they're SELLING OFF THEIR US ASSETS for multiple reasons.

But, you know, all that's well and good ... but should we ask the question where do we get our uranium from now?

The U.S. relies on foreign uranium, enrichment services to fuel its nuclear power plants

Perhaps a picture can save us a few thousand words ...





Just because it's against the law to export Uranium doesn't mean it's not happening. Why would Russia go in on the U1H deal at all if it's just going to stall out and produce nothing? Where do they profit? What was their incentive to make this purchase, if NOT to illegally export Uranium?




posted on Nov, 2 2017 @ 01:16 PM
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originally posted by: SRPrime

originally posted by: Gryphon66
All of the faux-servatives love Zero Hedge, right?



In 2013, ARMZ paid roughly $2.8 billion for the remaining 48 percent and full control of Uranium One. Finally, in that same year, Rosatom assumed direct ownership of the company, reorganizing it under Uranium One Holding (U1H) and delisting it from the Toronto stock exchange.


Just so we all know what we're talking about ...



Among U1H’s assets are a handful of US projects and exploration tracts. The most advanced among them are Jab and Antelope, Moore Ranch, and Willow Creek – all of which are in Wyoming, developed under the auspices of Uranium One USA and Uranium One Americas. The Willow Creek project is their only currently active operation.

So, to further answer the lead question: Russia, via Rosatom and U1H, owns roughly 20 percent of US uranium production capacity. The share of US reserves is much less clear as economic constraints significantly muddy the picture. Looking at actual production, U1H, via Willow Creek, produced an estimated 210 tons of uranium, or 11 percent of the 1887.5 tons extracted in the US in 2014.

Still, it’s somewhat disingenuous to say this uranium is now Russia’s, to do with what it pleases, or to suggest that any amount of the uranium will end up in Iran. The current licenses – held by the US-based subsidiaries and approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission – do not allow exports from any U1H US facility.


Zero Hedge May 7 2015

(This article is important because it is contemporaneous with another article from the New York Times in which a single unconfirmed statement from a U1H spokesperson said that material was indeed being shipped out of the US.)

So, summarizing again what this brouhaha is all about ... The Canadian company Uranium One WHICH ALREADY OWNED THE US URANIUM MINES under discussion, was brought under Russian company Rosatom control via a merger approved by CFIUS, a ten-member committee, as well as by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The State Department sits on this committee along with nine other Department level executives. Hillary Clinton did not vote on the matter of the Uranium One acquisition. (Washington Post).

Above, one can see that Zero Hedge focuses on the fact that what the Russians got was American PRODUCTION CAPACITY.

Why is that important?

Again, from Zero Hedge:



The truth is, the US uranium industry as its currently built isn’t all that American. In fact, it’s mostly Canadian. Qualms over perceived threats to national security are misplaced, though not entirely dismissible. The deal further illustrates an already pronounced trend of the decline of US nuclear capabilities and influence at all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Post-Fukushima – and post-shale gas revolution – US nuclear employment has fallen more than 34 percent and exploration and development drilling is down over 80 percent. Relatively low-grade uranium and low global prices stunt the value of US mines in the short- to medium-term. Further out, stricter regulation and a heavier reliance on the private sector, limit the industry’s potential abroad relative to its competitors.

Perhaps more importantly, the deal speaks to Rosatom’s aggressive new growth. Already the world’s most comprehensive nuclear services vendor, Rosatom is now one of the top three producers of uranium by volume worldwide. For the most part, the prize was Kazakhstan and not the United States, which is a symbolic victory at best.


SO ... The US didn't own the uranium production mines in question to start with... Canada did.

Now, someone will probably rightly point out that this article is from 2015, as I pointed out the other day that another "AH HA!" article from the Times was from the same year.

What's going on with these mines in 2017? Well, let's ask the World Nuclear Association:



The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a licence to Uranium One Americas for Moore Ranch in October 2010, to start production in 2012, but development is suspended. Uranium One’s additional projects in the Powder River Basin, including Ludeman, Allemand-Ross, Barge (1770 tU), Pine Tree and Ross Flats could also be developed as satellite operations with final processing through the Irigaray central plant.

Uranium One has some 4000 tU as measured resources (2235 t at Moore Ranch) and 23,000 tU as indicated resources in the state. Ludeman is quoted with 4200 tU total resources (NI 43-101). It also had plans for production from Antelope and JAB in the Great Divide Basin, but these were deferred due to endangered species concerns. Uranium One deposits in the Great Divide Basin of Wyoming are Antelope, JAB, Twin Buttes, Crooks Creek, Bull Springs, Stewart Creek, Cyclone Rim and West JAB.

In 2016 Uranium One sold 24 Wyoming properties in the Black Hills, Powder River Basin, Great Divide Basin, Laramie Basin, Shirley Basin and Wind River Basin areas to Anfield Resources for $6.55 million.


Wow! So, the Russians aren't mining much uranium at all these days, eh? In fact they're SELLING OFF THEIR US ASSETS for multiple reasons.

But, you know, all that's well and good ... but should we ask the question where do we get our uranium from now?

The U.S. relies on foreign uranium, enrichment services to fuel its nuclear power plants

Perhaps a picture can save us a few thousand words ...





Just because it's against the law to export Uranium doesn't mean it's not happening. Why would Russia go in on the U1H deal at all if it's just going to stall out and produce nothing? Where do they profit? What was their incentive to make this purchase, if NOT to illegally export Uranium?


It's called monopolizing the supply. The more uranium they control, the more leverage they have when selling it.



posted on Nov, 3 2017 @ 04:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: DJW001

originally posted by: SRPrime

originally posted by: Gryphon66
All of the faux-servatives love Zero Hedge, right?



In 2013, ARMZ paid roughly $2.8 billion for the remaining 48 percent and full control of Uranium One. Finally, in that same year, Rosatom assumed direct ownership of the company, reorganizing it under Uranium One Holding (U1H) and delisting it from the Toronto stock exchange.


Just so we all know what we're talking about ...



Among U1H’s assets are a handful of US projects and exploration tracts. The most advanced among them are Jab and Antelope, Moore Ranch, and Willow Creek – all of which are in Wyoming, developed under the auspices of Uranium One USA and Uranium One Americas. The Willow Creek project is their only currently active operation.

So, to further answer the lead question: Russia, via Rosatom and U1H, owns roughly 20 percent of US uranium production capacity. The share of US reserves is much less clear as economic constraints significantly muddy the picture. Looking at actual production, U1H, via Willow Creek, produced an estimated 210 tons of uranium, or 11 percent of the 1887.5 tons extracted in the US in 2014.

Still, it’s somewhat disingenuous to say this uranium is now Russia’s, to do with what it pleases, or to suggest that any amount of the uranium will end up in Iran. The current licenses – held by the US-based subsidiaries and approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission – do not allow exports from any U1H US facility.


Zero Hedge May 7 2015

(This article is important because it is contemporaneous with another article from the New York Times in which a single unconfirmed statement from a U1H spokesperson said that material was indeed being shipped out of the US.)

So, summarizing again what this brouhaha is all about ... The Canadian company Uranium One WHICH ALREADY OWNED THE US URANIUM MINES under discussion, was brought under Russian company Rosatom control via a merger approved by CFIUS, a ten-member committee, as well as by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

The State Department sits on this committee along with nine other Department level executives. Hillary Clinton did not vote on the matter of the Uranium One acquisition. (Washington Post).

Above, one can see that Zero Hedge focuses on the fact that what the Russians got was American PRODUCTION CAPACITY.

Why is that important?

Again, from Zero Hedge:



The truth is, the US uranium industry as its currently built isn’t all that American. In fact, it’s mostly Canadian. Qualms over perceived threats to national security are misplaced, though not entirely dismissible. The deal further illustrates an already pronounced trend of the decline of US nuclear capabilities and influence at all stages of the nuclear fuel cycle.

Post-Fukushima – and post-shale gas revolution – US nuclear employment has fallen more than 34 percent and exploration and development drilling is down over 80 percent. Relatively low-grade uranium and low global prices stunt the value of US mines in the short- to medium-term. Further out, stricter regulation and a heavier reliance on the private sector, limit the industry’s potential abroad relative to its competitors.

Perhaps more importantly, the deal speaks to Rosatom’s aggressive new growth. Already the world’s most comprehensive nuclear services vendor, Rosatom is now one of the top three producers of uranium by volume worldwide. For the most part, the prize was Kazakhstan and not the United States, which is a symbolic victory at best.


SO ... The US didn't own the uranium production mines in question to start with... Canada did.

Now, someone will probably rightly point out that this article is from 2015, as I pointed out the other day that another "AH HA!" article from the Times was from the same year.

What's going on with these mines in 2017? Well, let's ask the World Nuclear Association:



The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued a licence to Uranium One Americas for Moore Ranch in October 2010, to start production in 2012, but development is suspended. Uranium One’s additional projects in the Powder River Basin, including Ludeman, Allemand-Ross, Barge (1770 tU), Pine Tree and Ross Flats could also be developed as satellite operations with final processing through the Irigaray central plant.

Uranium One has some 4000 tU as measured resources (2235 t at Moore Ranch) and 23,000 tU as indicated resources in the state. Ludeman is quoted with 4200 tU total resources (NI 43-101). It also had plans for production from Antelope and JAB in the Great Divide Basin, but these were deferred due to endangered species concerns. Uranium One deposits in the Great Divide Basin of Wyoming are Antelope, JAB, Twin Buttes, Crooks Creek, Bull Springs, Stewart Creek, Cyclone Rim and West JAB.

In 2016 Uranium One sold 24 Wyoming properties in the Black Hills, Powder River Basin, Great Divide Basin, Laramie Basin, Shirley Basin and Wind River Basin areas to Anfield Resources for $6.55 million.


Wow! So, the Russians aren't mining much uranium at all these days, eh? In fact they're SELLING OFF THEIR US ASSETS for multiple reasons.

But, you know, all that's well and good ... but should we ask the question where do we get our uranium from now?

The U.S. relies on foreign uranium, enrichment services to fuel its nuclear power plants

Perhaps a picture can save us a few thousand words ...





Just because it's against the law to export Uranium doesn't mean it's not happening. Why would Russia go in on the U1H deal at all if it's just going to stall out and produce nothing? Where do they profit? What was their incentive to make this purchase, if NOT to illegally export Uranium?


It's called monopolizing the supply. The more uranium they control, the more leverage they have when selling it.


That's exactly what I think they were doing and they were helped. Not only did the State Dept. approve the deal, but Barrack Obama removed Rosatom from the banned list of companies before the deal was done.



posted on Nov, 6 2017 @ 10:22 PM
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a reply to: UKTruth

Looking out for their own greed, while their loyal Democrat constituency suffered. That's sick!



posted on Nov, 7 2017 @ 05:21 AM
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None of which would have been illegal at the time, right?



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